Did You Know…Victoria!

Hi everyone, here is our Did You Know… posting for May 2018!

Did you know…

Victoria!

So you’ve enjoyed the first two seasons of the PBS series Victoria, which chronicles the early life and reign of Queen Victoria and her dashing Prince Consort, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

But did you know…

The TV series is based upon a book, Victoria: A Novel, written by Daisy Goodwin?

It is!

Daisy Goodwin began doing research for the novel while she was a student at Cambridge University. Goodwin read Victoria’s personal diaries to gain a greater understanding of what life was like for the teenage Princess Victoria, who became queen just a month after her eighteenth birthday.

Interestingly, the novel Victoria actually ends at the time the two cousins, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, became engaged.

So the Goodwin book really is a bildungsroman!

And I love that word, bildungsroman!

Although the first time I read it, in a review of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows, I had to look it up in the dictionary!

But that is cool as learning is a wonderful thing!

The Concise Oxford English Dictionary defines bildungsroman as meaning “a novel dealing with a person’s formative years” , so the term does indeed apply to the story of the young Queen Victoria we see in seasons 1 & 2 of the PBS series.

And having now shown my library geekiness – I’ll get back to the subject at hand – the fact that the Goodwin novel Victoria, which admittedly is only her first book on Queen Victoria*, covers a relatively short period of Queen Victoria’s life beginning just as she becomes queen in 1837 and ending just before her marriage to Prince Albert in 1840. The TV series has already gone past that point in history. And the real life story of Queen Victoria went on for another 61 years! In fact, Queen Victoria held the record for the longest reigning monarch in British history for more than one hundred years until the record was broken by Queen Elizabeth in 2015.

Did you know…

That there are several book available that will allow you, like Daisy Goodwin, to read entries from Queen Victoria’s private diaries?

There are!

The library owns two of them —

Life at the Court of Queen Victoria: 1861-1901 written by Queen Victoria and edited by Barry St-John Nevill:

And

Dearest Mama: Private Correspondence of Queen Victoria and the Crown Princess of Prussia, 1861-64:

Did you know…

That the scientist Ada Lovelace, seen in Season 2, Episode 2 of the Victoria TV series, is considered to be the first computer programmer?

She is!

Disclaimer! I am not a math person! I’d rather write essays all day long then work on advanced math problems! So to properly illustrate Ada Lovelace’s importance, I’m going to quote from her New York Times obituary* the information that relays just why, today, she is considered the first computer programmer:

“A century before the dawn of the computer age, Ada Lovelace imagined the modern-day, general-purpose computer. It could be programmed to follow instructions, she wrote in 1843. It could not just calculate but also create, as it “weaves algebraic patterns just as the Jacquard loom weaves flowers and leaves.”

The computer she was writing about, the British inventor Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, was never built. But her writings about computing have earned Lovelace — who died of uterine cancer in 1852 at 36 — recognition as the first computer programmer.

The program she wrote for the Analytical Engine was to calculate the seventh Bernoulli number. (Bernoulli numbers, named after the Swiss mathematician Jacob Bernoulli, are used in many different areas of mathematics.) But her deeper influence was to see the potential of computing. The machines could go beyond calculating numbers, she said, to understand symbols and be used to create music or art.

“This insight would become the core concept of the digital age,” Walter Isaacson wrote in his book “The Innovators.” “Any piece of content, data or information — music, text, pictures, numbers, symbols, sounds, video — could be expressed in digital form and manipulated by machines.” (Claire Cain Miller, the New York Times, Online)

So you see, all of us who use technology, from casual cell phone users to tech geeks who eagerly await the next new and exciting personal technology news, should celebrate the work of Ada Lovelace, as without her work we might not have the technology we have today!

Did you know…

That author Walter Isaacson makes prominent mention of Ada Lovelace and her contributions to computer science in his book The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution?

He does!

Not surprisingly, considering how patriarchal an era the 19th Century was, female scientists and inventors of that era have largely been forgotten by those writing the history books. Walter Isaacson does his bit to set the record straight in his book by highlighting the important work done by female scientists.

And as a fun little aside, Isaacson was inspired to research the work done by female scientists and innovators and emphasize that work in his book by, of all things, his daughter’s school work! It seems when Isaacson’s daughter, Betsy, was in college she spent a long time procrastinating and putting off writing her obligatory college essay, much to the chagrin of her parents. And when she finally completed the two-page essay her father asked her what subject she had chosen to write about and she replied “Ada Lovelace”, and noted that historically, women who have made contributions to the sciences have been forgotten. And Betsy planted a seed that eventually inspired Isaacson to emphasize the work done by female scientists and inventors as a major thread in his book.

If you haven’t read the Isaacson book it is fascinating and it discusses a number of scientists and inventors including: Ada Lovelace, Admiral and Computer Scientist Grace Hopper, Vannevar Bush head of the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II, Robert Noyce of Intel, Bill Gates & Paul Alan of Microsoft, Steve Jobs & Steve Wozniak of Apple, Larry Page of Google, Jimmy Wales of Wikipedia and many others.

And should you wish to read Walter Isaacson’s excellent book on technological innovators – click on the photo to request it!

Getting back to the subject of Queen Victoria…

Did you know…

That Prince Albert really did break through the ice while skating and that Queen Victoria really did save him, as seen in the last episode of the second season of Victoria?

He did and she did!

We all know that TV adaptations of books, based on historical fact, are fictionalized a bit when adapted for television or the big screen. So I wondered when I saw that scene if it happened in real life or if it was just created to give more pizzazz to the storyline so I looked it up!

And I discovered that Prince Albert was an enthusiastic ice skater, and that in early 1841 Queen Victoria had a new pair of skates made especially for him. Subsequently, the royal couple went for a walk in Buckingham Palace’s Kensington Gardens with only one Maid of Honour, the Hon Miss Murray, in tow. Prince Albert put on his new skates and was zipping across the ice when he fell through the ice and into the frigid water. Queen Victoria directed Miss Murray to take one of her hands while she reached for Prince Albert with her other hand, and together they pulled Prince Albert out of the water!

And if I didn’t know that story was true I’d say it couldn’t possibly be – but it really did happen!

And here is a description of the accident given by Prince Albert himself in a letter he sent to his stepmother: “I managed, in skating, three days ago, to break through the ice in Buckingham Palace Gardens. I was making my way to Victoria, who was standing on the bank with one of her ladies, and when within some few yards of the bank I fell plump into the water, and had to swim for two or three minutes in order to get out.

“Victoria was the only person who had the presence of mind to lend me assistance, her lady being more occupied in screaming for help. The shock from the cold was extremely painful, and I cannot thank Heaven enough, that I escaped with nothing more than a severe cold.”

So the skating accident may sound like fiction but it is fact!

And for our final did you know of the month…

Did you know…

That Queen Victoria and Prince Albert had nine children?

They did!

And here is a list of Queen Victoria & Prince Albert’s children:

Vicky (Princess Victoria, later German Empress, 1840-1901):

Bertie (Albert Edward Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, 1841-1910)

Alice (Princess Alice, later Grand Duchess of Hesse, 1843-1878)
Note: Princess Alice’s great-grandson is the current Prince Consort, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Alfred (Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, later Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha 1844-1900)

Helena (Princess Helena, later Princess Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, 1846-1923)

Louise (Princess Louise, later Duchess of Argyll, 1848-1939)

Arthur (Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, 1850-1942)

Leopold (Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany 1853-1884)

Beatrice (Princess Beatrice, later Princess Henry of Battenberg, 1857-1944)

Victoria Books & DVDs To Enjoy:

Books:

Queen Victoria’s Children by John Van der Kiste

Victoria: A Novel by Daisy Goodwin

Victoria and Albert: A Royal Love Affair by Goodwin and Sarah Sheridan:

Note: This is the companion book to the second season of the Victoria TV series!

Victoria’s Daughters by Jerrold Packard:

DVDs

Edward The King (TV Mini Series from 1975):

And yes, the series is about Queen Victoria’s son Bertie, known to history as King Edward VII. However, as Queen Victoria lived a long time and King Edward survived her by less than ten years — there is a quite a bit of Victoria seen in this dramatized series.

Queen Victoria’s Children:

Queen Victoria’s Empire:

Victoria & Abdul (2017):

Victoria: the Complete First Season:

Victoria: The Complete Second Season:

The Young Victoria (2008) (A stand alone movie not related to the current PBS TV series):

* Season 2 of the PBS series Victoria is based upon the book Victoria and Albert: A Royal Love Affair which was co-authored by Daisy Goodwin and Sarah Sheridan

*Overlooked: Ada Lovelace – Overlooked is a new obituary series the New York has created that highlights the lives of women whose contributions to society were previously overlooked due to their gender.

Have a great day!
Linda, SSCL

References (Because libraries love to cite their sources!)

Bilton, Nick. The Women Tech Forgot ‘The Innovators’ by Walter Isaacson: How Women Shaped Technology. 14 October 2014. The New York Times. Accessed April 30, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/02/fashion/the-innovators-by-walter-isaacson-how-women-shaped-technology.html

Dearest Mama: Letters Between Queen Victoria and the Crown Princess of Prussia 1861-1864. New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winston. 1969.

Gilbert, Deborah. Daisy Goodwin on Writing and Creating Victoria on MASTERPIECE. 12 January, 2018.Thirteen (PBS). Online. Accessed April 30, 2018.
https://www.thirteen.org/blog-post/daisy-goodwin-on-writing-and-creating-victoria-on-masterpiece/

Isaacson, Walter, The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution. New York. Simon & Schuster. 2014.

Miller, Claire Cain. Overlooked: Ada Lovelace: A Gifted mathematician who is now recognized as the first computer programmer. The New York Times. Online. Accessed April 30, 2018.
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/obituaries/overlooked-ada-lovelace.html

Life at the Court of Queen Victoria: 1861-1901. Edited by Barry St-John Nevill, Illustration from the collection of Lord Edward Pelham-Clinton, Master of the Household. Exeter. Webb & Bower, 1984.

Goodwin, Daisy. Victoria. St. Martin’s Press. New York. 2016.

Prince Albert. The Home of the Royal Family. Online. Accessed April 30, 2018.
https://www.royal.uk/prince-albert

The true story of Prince Albert’s ice-skating accident – and how Queen Victoria saved his life. Radio Times. Online. Accessed. April 30, 2018.
http://www.radiotimes.com/news/tv/2018-04-27/the-true-story-of-prince-alberts-ice-skating-accident-and-how-queen-victoria-saved-his-life/

Victoria (r. 1837-1901). The Home of the Royal Family. Online. Accessed April 30, 2018.
https://www.royal.uk/victoria-r-1837-1901

StarCat (The catalog of physical materials, i.e. books, DVDs, music CDs etc.):

OverDrive (The catalog of digital materials including eBooks, downloadable audio books and a handful of streaming videos):

Freegal Music Service (The streaming catalog of music available for free to library card holders):

RB Digital (Free magazines – on demand!):

And apps for OverDrive, Freegal & RB Digital can be found in your app store – so you can access digital library content on a laptop/desktop computer or on a mobile device.

Non-Fiction DVD Recommendations 12 2 17

Happy Saturday everyone!

Here are our three recommended non-fiction DVDs for this week!

(Click on the photos to request the DVDs)

Citizen Jane Battle for the City

Description: Citizen Jane is a timely tale of what can happen when engaged citizens fight the power for the sake of a better world. Arguably no one did more to shape our understanding of the modern American city than Jane Jacobs, the visionary activist and writer who fought to preserve urban communities in the face of destructive development projects. Director Matt Tyranuer (Valentino: The Last Emperor) vividly brings to life Jacobs 1960s showdown with ruthless construction kingpin Robert Moses over his plan to raze lower Manhattan to make way for a highway, a dramatic struggle over the very soul of the neighborhood.

Dewey Number: DVD 307 CIT

Trailer:

The First Silent Night:

Description: Join Simon Callow as he uncovers the origins of Silent Night, from the Austrian village of Oberndorf to the city of Salzburg, birthplace of the worlds favorite carol. Two impoverished children, Joseph Mohr and Franz Gruber, met one day in a country church, where they united Grubers music and Mohrs text into this classic carol about the birth of a third poor boy on a quiet night in ancient Palestine.

Dewey Number: DVD 781.723 FIR

Trailer: No trailer available.

Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts Stingers and Zingers:

Description: The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts were a fixture on NBC from 1973 to 1984. In those 11 years, Dean and his panel of pals successfully ridiculed, embarrassed and made fun of legendary stars like Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball, Sammy Davis Jr. and Dean Martin himself, to name a few, and America loved it!

This 8-DVD set includes 24 complete Celebrity Roasts and features dozens of stars from the day, such as Valerie Harper, Jack Klugman, Tony Randall, Michael Landon, Carroll O Connor, Sen. Hubert Humphrey, Wilt Chamberlain, Danny Thomas, Ted Knight, Dan Haggerty, Mr. T, Ed McMahon, Redd Foxx, Joe Garagiola, Evel Knievel, Hank Aaron, Peter Marshall, Truman Capote, William Conrad, Monty Hall, Leo Durocher, Bobby Riggs, Joe Namath,  Bob Hope, Ed Asner, Lucille Ball, Georgia Engel, Milton Berle, Dr. Joyce Brothers, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Ruth Buzzi, Sid Caesar, Foster Brooks, Charo, Howard Cosell, Angie Dickinson, Phyllis Diller, Nipsey Russell, Lorne Greene, William Holden, Gabe Kaplan, Art Linkletter, Rich Little, Paul Lynde, Scatman Crothers, Dick Martin, Red Buttons, Audrey Meadows, Bob Newhart, LaWanda Page, Isabel Sanford, Harvey Korman, Soupy Sales, Jimmie Walker, Orson Welles and many more.

Dewey Number: DVD 791.4572 DEA

Trailer: No trailer available.

The library is open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays – so while you’re out and about today, drop in and and check out some books and DVDs!

Have a great weekend,
Linda, SSCL

Non-Fiction DVD Recommendations 11 4 17

Hi everyone, here are our three recommended non-fiction DVDs for this week!

(Click on the photos to request the DVDs)

1. Solace – A Windham Hill Collection

Description:This relaxing collection of music, perfect for fall, and  includes the following artists/songs:

To be by Montreux

Aerial Boundaries by Michael Hedges

Clockwork by Alex de Grassi

Cast Your Fate to the Wind by George Winston

The Bricklayer’s Beautiful Daughter by Will Ackerman

Bradley’s Dream by Liz Story

Night In That Land by Nightnoise

New Electric India by Shadowfax

Carol of the Bells by Windham Hill Artists

Dream by Tuck & Patti

The Gift by Jim Brickman and friends

And

Reflections of Passion by Yanni

Dewey Decimal Number:

DVD 781.66 SOL

Trailer:

2. Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North

Description: In the feature documentary Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. She and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade and gain powerful new perspectives on the black/white divide.

Producer/Director: Katrina Browne. Co-Directors: Alla Kovgan, Jude Ray. Co-Producers: Elizabeth Delude-Dix, Juanita Capri Brown.

In Traces of the Trade, Producer/Director Katrina Browne tells the story of her forefathers, the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. Given the myth that the South is solely responsible for slavery, viewers will be surprised to learn that Browne’s ancestors were Northerners. The film follows Browne and nine fellow family members on a remarkable journey which brings them face-to-face with the history and legacy of New England’s hidden enterprise.

From 1769 to 1820, DeWolf fathers, sons and grandsons trafficked in human beings. They sailed their ships from Bristol, Rhode Island to West Africa with rum to trade for African men, women and children. Captives were taken to plantations that the DeWolfs owned in Cuba or were sold at auction in such ports as Havana and Charleston. Sugar and molasses were then brought from Cuba to the family-owned rum distilleries in Bristol. Over the generations, the family transported more than ten thousand enslaved Africans across the Middle Passage. They amassed an enormous fortune. By the end of his life, James DeWolf had been a U.S. Senator and was reportedly the second richest man in the United States.

The enslavement of Africans was business for more than just the DeWolf family. It was a cornerstone of Northern commercial life. The Triangle Trade drove the economy of many port cities (Rhode Island had the largest share in the trade of any state), and slavery itself existed in the North for over 200 years. Northern textile mills used slave-picked cotton from the South to fuel the Industrial Revolution, while banks and insurance companies played a key role throughout the period. While the DeWolfs were one of only a few “slaving” dynasties, the network of commercial activities that they were tied to involved an enormous portion of the Northern population. Many citizens, for example, would buy shares in slave ships in order to make a profit.

The film follows ten DeWolf descendants (ages 32-71, ranging from sisters to seventh cousins) as they retrace the steps of the Triangle Trade, visiting the DeWolf hometown of Bristol, Rhode Island, slave forts on the coast of Ghana, and the ruins of a family plantation in Cuba. Back home, the family confronts the thorny topic of what to do now. In the context of growing calls for reparations for slavery, family members struggle with the question of how to think about and contribute to “repair.” Meanwhile, Browne and her family come closer to the core: their love/hate relationship with their own Yankee culture and privileges; the healing and transformation needed not only “out there,” but inside themselves.

The issues the DeWolf descendants are confronted with dramatize questions that apply to the nation as a whole: What, concretely, is the legacy of slavery—for diverse whites, for diverse blacks, for diverse others? Who owes who what for the sins of the fathers of this country? What history do we inherit as individuals and as citizens? How does Northern complicity change the equation? What would repair—spiritual and material—really look like and what would it take?

Dewey Decimal Number:

DVD 382.44 TRA

Trailer:

3. Cruising America’s Waterways: The Erie Canal Albany to Buffalo

The award-winning Cruising America’s Waterways series explores New York State’s Erie Canal, the world’s most successful canal. Opened in 1825, today’s canal is a recreational and historic waterway lined with cultural and scenic opportunities. Learn about the canal’s mechanical structures; travel on a hire boat; visit charming canalside communities including Lockport, Baldwinsville, Fairport, Waterford, and Little Falls; and tour attractions in Syracuse, Rochester, and of course, Albany and Buffalo. Whether traveling by boat, car, bicycle, or simply walking on canalside trails, the Erie is one of America’s greatest waterways.

Dewey Decimal System Number: DVD 386.4 ERI

Have a good weekend!

Linda, SSCL

Non-Fiction DVD Recommendations 9 29 17

Hi everyone, here are our recommended non-fiction DVDs for this week!

(Click on the photos to request the DVDs)

Touching the Wild: Living with the Mule Deer of Deadman Gulch:

Description: Joe Huttos remarkable ability to interact with wild creatures was previously portrayed in the award-winning NATURE film, My Life as a Turkey. His new wild family is made up of mule deer living high in the mountains near his home in Wyoming, and the extraordinary story of how he became one of them pushes once again at the boundaries of how we perceive wild animals.

Dewey: DVD 599.653 TOU

Trailer:

Heart of a Dog:


Description: Heart of a Dog marks the first feature film by multimedia artist Laurie Anderson in over thirty years. A cinematic tone poem that flows from a sustained meditation on death and other forms of absence, the film seamlessly weaves together thoughts on Tibetan Buddhism, reincarnation, the modern surveillance state, and the artistic lives of dogs, with an elegy for the filmmaker s beloved rat terrier, Lolabelle, at its heart. Narrated by Anderson with her characteristic wry wit, and featuring a plaintive, free-form score by the filmmaker, the tender and provocative Heart of a Dog continues Anderson s five-decade career of imbuing the everyday with a sense of dreamlike wonder.

Dewey: DVD 702.81 HEA

Trailer:

Maya Angelou And Still I Rise:

Description: This film celebrates Dr. Maya Angelou by weaving her words with rare and intimate archival photographs and videos, which paint hidden moments of her life during some of America s most defining moments. From her upbringing in the Depression-era South, to her work with Malcolm X in Ghana to her inaugural speech for President Bill Clinton, the film takes us on an incredible journey through the life of a true American icon.

Dewey: DVD 818.54 MAY

Trailer: 

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

Non-Fiction DVD Recommendations 8 18 17

Hi everyone, here are three Non-Fiction DVD recommendations for the week.

Secrets of the Dead: After Stonehenge:

Description: Secrets of the Dead: After Stonehenge follows a team of archaeologists, scientists, historians and specialists, as they shed new light on the ancient history of the western world. Perfectly preserved in mud, the prehistoric British Bronze Age Village – built at least one thousand years after Stonehenge – has been called the “British Pompeii.”

“The Pompeii analogy: it’s as if we’ve got a pristine settlement,” says Mark Knight, site director, Cambridge Archaeological Unit. “A pristine image of exactly what was going on within a settlement 3,000 years ago.”

Because the site is so delicate, the experts have been working in secret inside the quarry. But now they are rushing to complete their work and map the site before the land is returned for its owner’s use.

Have their findings forever changed what we know about life in Bronze Age Britain? What revelations about the villager’s lives can be gleaned from the cache of finds, unprecedented in number and quality, emerging from the marshy Fens?

“This is the crown jewels in terms of what it will tell us about past humanities and the way that people lived in this landscape 3,000 years ago,” says Knight after taking stock of the extraordinary findings. Has this English settlement rewritten Western history? — PBS

Dewey Decimal System Call Number: DVD 930.1 AFT

Trailer:

Request Link: https://goo.gl/2qwWjA

They Grow Up Fast:

Description: With the birth of his first child, Independent filmmaker Darren Doane picked up his camera and began documenting the process of becoming a family. Ten years in the making, THEY GROW UP FAST is a profound and entertaining documentary for the entire family. From mud puddles and family road trips to backyard parties and the birth of their third child in the front seat of their truck, Doane captures all of the amazing adventures one has becoming a family. Good friend and best selling author ND Wilson crafted the script and brought new eyes to what it means to be a father and mother and the high calling of faithful parenting. THEY GROW UP FAST will entertain kids and inspire parents as they travel along with the Doane’s on their grand adventure of growing as a family. – from the Publisher

Dewey Decimal System Call Number: DVD 308.85 THE

Trailer:

Request Link: https://goo.gl/j92dss

The Talk: Race in America

Description: THE TALK is a two-hour documentary about the increasingly necessary conversation taking place in homes and communities across the country between parents of color and their children, especially sons, about how to behave if they are ever stopped by the police. – from PBS.

Dewey Decimal System Call Number: DVD 363.23 TAL

Trailer:

Request Link:

https://goo.gl/LczgmZ

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

 

Dewey DVD Recommendations Friday, July 7, 2017

This week I’m going to recommend the following three Non-Fiction DVDs for your weekend viewing pleasure: Ken Burn’s Baseball, Dick Cavett’s Watergate and a PBS documentary on the great Civil Rights Activist and Senator — John Lewis — titled Get In The Way.

1. Ken Burns Baseball:

This 11 disc set tells the story of baseball from its very beginnings. Seen in the photo is the case of disc 1 which chronicles the story between the years 1840 and 1910.

The Dewey number for baseball is 796.357 and the Dewey number for this specific case is: DVD 796.357 BAS 1&2.

The 1&2 indicates that this case contains the first two discs in a multi disc set.

2. Dick Cavett’s Watergate

This PBS special chronicles the news and happenings of the Watergate Crisis of the 1970s as it was relayed on the legendary Dick Cavett talk show.

The Dewey number for this set is DVD 973.924 DIC – the 970s being the place you’ll find books on American history.

3. John Lewis Get In The Way:

Our third suggestion for this week is another PBS documentary – this one on the legendary Civil Rights Activist and Senator – John Lewis who talks about what it was like to live through and be an integral part of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Senator Lewis also discusses some of the main issues our government and nation face today.

Since this disc features a biographical documentary, the Dewey number isn’t a number at all! Just the prefix B is used to indicate it is a biography, and then the last name of the person it is about in this case John Lewis. So the call number for this disc is B LEWIS.

Have a great day!

Linda, SSCL

 

 

Dewey DVD Recommendations Friday, June 30, 2017

This week I’m going to recommend the following three Non-Fiction DVDs for your weekend viewing pleasure: Chasing UFOs, Apollo 11: A Night To Remember & The 1930s. 

1. Chasing UFOs (Nat Geo)

This two disc set takes a look at UFO sightings and, unlike many UFO related “documentaries,” this one is put out by National Geographic!

The Dewey number for this DVD is 001.942 CHA

And in Library Land the books on the paranormal can be found in the zeros! So if you’d like to browse through the books on UFOs, haunted places, Big Foot and the supernatural in general — this is your section!

Here’s a link to the StarCat request page for National Geographic’s Chasing UFOs: 

https://goo.gl/6qSw1c

2. Apollo 11: A Night To Remember

Our second non-fiction DVD for this week is put out by the BBC and titled Apollo 11: A Night To Remember and contains rare news footage chronicling the journey of the Apollo 11 crew from the moment their ship left the planet, through the first lunar landing and on to their triumphant return to Earth in July of 1969.

The call number for this set is 629.454 APO

And on a Dewey note, if you’re looking for books on space flights check out the Dewey Decimal Section 629.454!

Here’s a link to request the DVD in StarCat:

https://goo.gl/GZzCyQ

and

3. The 1930s

This five disc PBS documentary offers a glimpse into the lost world of the 1930s. This set offers a look at how regular Americans lived in the 1930s and what the big concerns and topics of interest were. Episodes include: Surviving The Dust Bowl, Sea Biscuit, The Crash of 1929, The Civilian Conservation Corps and Hoover Dam.

The call number for this set is: 973.917 NIN.

And if you’re looking for books on American history, you should check out the Dewey Decimal section 973 — as there is where you will find them!

Here’s are links to request the two cases in the set (which contain 5 DVDs between them):

https://goo.gl/eRg7Mm

Have a great weekend!
Linda, SSCL

P.S. The library is open on Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. so while you’re out and about on Saturday — drop in and check out some books and DVDs to enjoy over the weekend!

P.S.S. The library is also open, our regular hours of 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., on Monday, July 3. So if you’ve got the day off drop in and pick out some books & DVDs!

 

Daily Print & Digital Suggested Reads: Friday, April 14, 2017

Hi everyone, here are our suggested daily recommended titles in print or media and digital formats.

Our digital suggestion for today is the e-book:

You Don’t Know My Name: The Black Angel Chronicles

by Kristen Orlando:

Fighter, faker, student, spy: heart-pounding action and spine-tingling suspense intertwine in an electrifying debut for fans of emotional thrillers with just the right dash of high school drama.

Seventeen-year-old Reagan Elizabeth Hillis is used to changing identities overnight, lying to every friend she’s ever had, and pushing away anyone who gets too close. Trained in mortal combat and weaponry her entire life, Reagan is expected to follow in her parents’ footsteps and join the ranks of the most powerful top-secret agency in the world, the Black Angels. Falling in love with the boy next door was never part of the plan.

Now Reagan must decide: Will she use her incredible talents and lead the dangerous life she was born into, or throw it all away to follow her heart and embrace the normal life she’s always wanted? And does she even have a choice?

Find out if you are ready to join the Black Angels in debut author Kristen Orlando’s You Don’t Know My Name, the captivating and emotional first book in the Black Angel Chronicles, chosen by readers like you for Macmillan’s young adult imprint Swoon Reads.

Here’s a link to the checkout page in the Digital Catalog:

https://stls.overdrive.com/media/2813364

And our physical format suggestion for today is the newly released DVD:

Mercy Street, Season 2 (PBS):

Allegiances blur and loyalties shift as the Civil War pushes the drama beyond the hospital. Follow the growing chaos at Alexandria’s Mansion House, the precarious position of the Green family, and the changing situation of the burgeoning black population.

From executive producers Ridley Scott and David W. Zucker of Scott Free, Lisa Q. Wolfinger, and David Zabel, Mercy Street follows the doctors, nurses, and soldiers, as well as free, enslaved, and contraband African Americans and other residents of the war-torn Virginia city, as they navigate the new world emerging from the most cataclysmic event in our country’s history.

You can request the DVD set by clicking on the following link to StarCat:

https://goo.gl/4O6OQS

Or by calling the library at: 607-936-3713 x 502.

Have a great day!
Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat: The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc. http://starcat.stls.org/

The Digital Catalog: The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos: https://stls.overdrive.com/

Freegal Music Service: This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day: http://stlsny.freegalmusic.com/

Zinio: Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available: https://www.rbdigital.com/stlschemungcony

About Library Mobile Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Daily Print & Digital Suggested Reads: Monday, April 3, 2017

Hi everyone, here are our suggested daily recommended titles in print or media and digital formats.

Our digital suggestion for today is the streaming video:

The Congress (2012):

Ken Burns profiles a durable American institution in his elegant, penetrating portrait of the U.S. Congress. Narrated by David McCullough, the film uses historic footage and interviews with “insiders” David Broder, Alistair Cooke, and Cokie Roberts to detail the first 200 years. The film chronicles careers of notable members and charts the continuing growth of the Capitol building, in readings from diary entries, letters, and famous speeches.

Here’s a link to the checkout page in the Digital Catalog:

https://stls.overdrive.com/media/778568

And the physical item for today is the print book:

Brown Is the New White: How the Demographic Revolution Has Created a New American Majority by Steve Phillips:

* NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * WASHINGTON POST BESTSELLER * Despite the abundant evidence from Obama’s victories proving that the U.S. population has fundamentally changed, many progressives and Democrats continue to waste millions of dollars chasing white swing voters. Explosive population growth of people of color in America over the past fifty years has laid the foundation for a New American Majority consisting of progressive people of color (23 percent of all eligible voters) and progressive whites (28 percent of all eligible voters). These two groups make up 51 percent of all eligible voters in America right now, and that majority is growing larger every day. Failing to properly appreciate this reality, progressives are at risk of missing this moment in history–and losing.

A leader in national politics for thirty years, Steve Phillips has had a front-row seat to these extraordinary political changes. A civil rights lawyer and a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, Phillips draws on his extensive political experience to unveil exactly how people of color and progressive whites add up to a new majority, and what this means for U.S. politics and policy. A book brimming with urgency and hope, Brown Is the New White exposes how far behind the curve Democrats are in investing in communities of color–while illuminating a path forward to seize the opportunity created by the demographic revolution.

Here’s a link to the request page in StarCat:

https://goo.gl/vr5Olv

Or by calling the library at: 607-936-3713 x 502.

Have a great day!
Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat: The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc. http://starcat.stls.org/

The Digital Catalog: The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos: https://stls.overdrive.com/

Freegal Music Service: This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day: http://stlsny.freegalmusic.com/

Zinio: Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available: https://www.rbdigital.com/stlschemungcony

About Library Mobile Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Daily Print & Digital Suggested Reads: Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Hi everyone, here are our suggested daily recommended titles in print or media and digital formats.

Our digital suggestion for today is the streaming video:

eyes-on-the-prize

Eyes on the Prize, Episode 1 Awakenings 1954-1956:

From PBS – A look at the events in post-World War II America that led to the civil rights protests and marches. The program depicts Southern race discrimination that prevailed at the beginning of the civil rights movement’s activities.

Note: This is the first video in a six part series – all six episodes of this critically acclaimed PBS series can be streamed through OverDrive!

Here’s a link to the checkout page in the Digital Catalog:

https://stls.overdrive.com/media/2952756

And the physical item for today is a print book:

into-the-firestorm

Into the Firestorm by Kat Martin:

“I love her books!” —Linda Lael Miller

“Martin is superb.” —RT Book Reviews

At Brodie Operations Security Service, Inc., following your instincts is company policy . .

M. Cassidy—Luke Brodie had heard the name before, some novice bounty hunter working Seattle, catching tricky skips with more success than a newcomer should expect. But the dark curls, sparkly top, and impressive cleavage were not what Brodie had pictured.

Emma Cassidy is tough and smart and sexy as hell. She’s also popping up a step ahead of him every time he’s close to the capture he wants most . . . and there’s no room for learning on the trail of this monster.

Emma has idolized Luke Brodie, the bounty hunter who can bring anyone in. The big man in the soft shoes, with a face like a fallen angel and a reputation for breaking hearts. Watching him in action is intoxicating. But her fight with Rudy Vance is fiercely personal. If he gets too close, Brodie will find out just how ferocious she can be . . .

Here’s a link to the request page in StarCat:

https://goo.gl/x7RGbr

Or by calling the library at: 607-936-3713 x 502.

Have a great day!
Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat: The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc. http://starcat.stls.org/

The Digital Catalog: The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos: https://stls.overdrive.com/

Freegal Music Service: This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day: http://stlsny.freegalmusic.com/

Zinio: Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available: https://www.rbdigital.com/stlschemungcony

About Library Mobile Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.