Suggested Listening January 17, 2020

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations of the week!

(Click on the Book/eBook/CD/DVD or book cover to request the item)

5 Classic Albums Plus Bonus Singles And Rare Tracks by Chuck Berry (Genre: Traditional Rock):

A four disc collection featuring some Chuck Berry’s vintage albums and some bonus tracks including songs from the 1957 After School sessions (1957) and the entire albums One Dozen Berry’s (1958), Chuck Berry On Top (1959), Rockin’ At The Hops (1960) and New Juke Box Hits (1961)

The collection includes more than eighty songs including You Can’t Catch Me, Too Much Monkey Business, Brown Eyed Handsome Man, Sweet Little Sixteen, Almost Grown, Rock N’ Roll Music, Roll Over Beethoven and Bye, Bye Johnny.

Aisle Seat Great Film Music (1990) by The Boston Pops conducted by John Williams (Genre: Film Music, Scores):

A great collection of popular film music from 1990.

1. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial: The Flying Theme
2. Chariots of Fire (Main Theme)
3. Raiders of the Lost Ark March
4. Yes Giorgio: If We Were in Love
5. New York, New York: Main Theme
6. Gone with the Wind: Tara’s Theme
7. Over the Rainbow
8. Singin’ in the Rain (Main Theme)
9. Friendly Persuasion: Main Theme

Cool Strutting (1958) by Sonny Clark with Art Farmer, Jackie McLean, Paul Chambers & Philly Joe Jones (Genre: Jazz):

A classic album by the talented composer and pianist.

1. Cool Struttin’
2. Blue Minor
3. Deep Night
4. Royal Flush
5. Lover

In My Tribe (1987) by 10,000 Maniacs (Genre: Pop, Rock):

The quintessential album by the eighties pop group.

1. What’s the Matter Here?
2. Hey Jack Kerouac
3. Like the Weather
4. Cherry Tree
5. The Painted Desert
6. Don’t Talk
7. Gun Shy
8. My Sister Rose
9. A Campfire Song

The Sweethearts Project (2006) by the Kit McClure Band (Genre: Jazz, Big Band):

Saxophonist Kit McClure and her big band pay tribute to the vintage female big band of the 1940s The International Sweethearts of Rhythm with this swinging collection of music!

1. Vi Vigor
2. Jump Children
3. Just the Thing
4. Diggin’ Dirt
5. Don’t Get It Twisted
6. She’s Crazy with the Heat
7. Slightly Frantic
8. I Never Get Tired
9. One O’Clock Jump
10. Honeysuckle Rose
11. Perdido

Videos Of The Week:

Guitar Boogie by Chuck Berry

 

 

Havana Moon by Chuck Berry

 

 

Roll Over Beethoven by Chuck Berry

 

 

Chariots of Fire by The Boston Pops with John Williams conducing

 

 

E.T. Adventures on Earth by The Boston Pops with John Williams conducing

 

 

Raiders of the Lost Arc by The Boston Pops with John Williams conducing

 

 

Cool Struttin’ by Sonny Clark

 

 

Deep Night by Sonny Clark

 

 

Royal Flush by Sonny Clark

 

 

A Campfire Song by 10,000 Maniacs

 

 

Like The Weather by 10,000 Maniacs

 

 

What’s The Matter Here? By 10, 000 Maniacs

 

 

I Never Get Tired by The Kit McClure Band

 

 

Jump Children by The Kit McClure Band with Carline Ray

 

 

Just The Thing by The Kit McClure Band

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS: Libby & RBDigital:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the Libby and/or the RBDigital app, to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading January 14, 2020

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audiobooks, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG RECOMMENDATIONS:

The Fountain of St. James Court or Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman: A Novel by Sena Jeter Naslund:

New York Times bestselling author Sena Jeter Naslund explores the artistic processes and lives of creative women in her groundbreaking literary opus The Fountain of St. James Court; or Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman.

Sena Jeter Naslund’s inspiring novel-within-a-novel depicts the lives of both a fictional contemporary writer and a historic painter whose works now hang in the great museums of Europe and America.

The story opens at midnight beside a beautifully illumined fountain of Venus Rising from the Sea. Kathryn Callaghan has just finished her novel about painter Élisabeth Vigée-LeBrun, a survivor of the French Revolution hated for her sympathetic portraits of Marie Antoinette. Though still haunted by the story she has written, Kathryn must leave the eighteenth-century European world she has researched and made vivid in order to return to her own life as an American in 2012.

Naslund’s spellbinding new novel presents the reader with an alternate version of The Artist: a woman of age who has created for herself, against enormous odds, a fulfilling life of thoroughly realized achievement.

Hex Life, Wicked New Tales of Witchery edited by Rachel Deering & Christopher Golden:

Brand-new stories of witches and witchcraft written by popular female fantasy authors, including Kelley Armstrong, Rachel Caine and Sherrilyn Kenyon writing in their own bestselling universes!

These are tales of wickedness… stories of evil and cunning, written by today’s women you should fear. Includes tales from Kelley Armstong, Rachel Caine and Sherrilyn Kenyon, writing in their own bestselling universes.

Hex Life: Wicked New Tales of Witchery will take the classic tropes of tales of witchcraft and infuse them with fresh, feminist perspective and present-day concerns—even if they’re set in the past. These witches might be monstrous, or they might be heroes, depending on their own definitions. Even the kind hostess with the candy cottage thought of herself as the hero of her own story. After all, a woman’s gotta eat.

Bring out your dread.

In the Skin Of A Lion by Michael Ondaatje:

Bristling with intelligence and shimmering with romance, this novel tests the boundary between history and myth. Patrick Lewis arrives in Toronto in the 1920s and earns his living searching for a vanished millionaire and tunneling beneath Lake Ontario. In the course of his adventures, Patrick’s life intersects with those of characters who reappear in Ondaatje’s Booker Prize-winning The English Patient.

The Pieces We Keep by Kristina McMorris:

In this richly emotional novel, Kristina McMorris evokes the depth of a mother’s bond with her child, and the power of personal histories to echo through generations. . .

Two years have done little to ease veterinarian Audra Hughes’s grief over her husband’s untimely death. Eager for a fresh start, Audra plans to leave Portland for a new job in Philadelphia. Her seven-year-old son, Jack, seems apprehensive about flying—but it’s just the beginning of an anxiety that grows to consume him.

As Jack’s fears continue to surface in recurring and violent nightmares, Audra hardly recognizes the introverted boy he has become. Desperate, she traces snippets of information unearthed in Jack’s dreams, leading her to Sean Malloy, a struggling US Army veteran wounded in Afghanistan. Together they unravel a mystery dating back to World War II, and uncover old family secrets that still have the strength to wound—and perhaps, at last, to heal.

Intricate and beautifully written, The Pieces We Keep illuminates those moments when life asks us to reach beyond what we know and embrace what was once unthinkable. Deftly weaving together past and present, herein lies a story that is at once poignant and thought-provoking, and as unpredictable as the human heart.

You Suck at Cooking, The Absurdly Practical Guide to Sucking Slightly Less at Making Food: A Cookbook:

Do you crave food all the time? Do you think you might want to eat again in the future? Do you suck at cooking? Inspired by the wildly popular YouTube channel, these 60+ recipes will help you suck slightly less

You already know the creator of the YouTube show You Suck at Cooking by his well-manicured hands and mysterious voice, and now you’ll know him for this equally well-manicured and mysterious tome. It contains more than sixty recipes for beginner cooks and noobs alike, in addition to hundreds of paragraphs and sentences, as well as photos and drawings.

You’ll learn to cook with unintimidating ingredients in dishes like Broccoli Cheddar Quiche Cupcake Muffin-Type Things, Eddie’s Roasted Red Pepper Dip (while also learning all about Eddie’s sad, sad life), Jalapeño Chicken, and also other stuff. In addition, there are cooking tips that can be applied not only to the very recipes in this book, but also to recipes outside of this book, and to all other areas of your life (with mixed results).

In the end, you just might suck slightly less at cooking.*

*Results not guaranteed

PRINT RECOMMENDATIONS:

Changes by Jim Butcher:

Long ago, Susan Rodriguez was Harry Dresden’s lover-until she was attacked by his enemies, leaving her torn between her own humanity and the bloodlust of the vampiric Red Court. Susan then disappeared to South America, where she could fight both her savage gift and those who cursed her with it.

Now Arianna Ortega, Duchess of the Red Court, has discovered a secret Susan has long kept, and she plans to use it-against Harry. To prevail this time, he may have no choice but to embrace the raging fury of his own untapped dark power. Because Harry’s not fighting to save the world…

He’s fighting to save his child.

Island In The Sea of Time by S. M. Stirling

“Utterly engaging…a page-turner that is certain to win the author legions of new readers and fans.”—George R. R. Martin, author of A Game of Thrones

It’s spring on Nantucket and everything is perfectly normal, until a sudden storm blankets the entire island. When the weather clears, the island’s inhabitants find that they are no longer in the late twentieth century…but have been transported instead to the Bronze Age! Now they must learn to survive with suspicious, warlike peoples they can barely understand and deal with impending disaster, in the shape of a would-be conqueror from their own time.

The Name of The Rose by Umberto Eco:

Umberto Eco’s first novel, an international sensation and winner of the Premio Strega and the Prix Médicis Étranger awards

The year is 1327. Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate. When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective. His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon—all sharpened to a glistening edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity. He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where “the most interesting things happen at night.”

“Like the labyrinthine library at its heart, this brilliant novel has many cunning passages and secret chambers…Fascinating…ingenious…dazzling.” – Newsweek

The Summoner by Gail Z. Martin:

The comfortable world of Martris Drayke, second son of King Bricen of Margolan, is shattered when his older half-brother, Jared, and Jared’s dark mage, Foor Arontala, kill the king and seize the throne. Tris is the only surviving member of the royal family aside from Jared the traitor. Tris flees with three friends: Soterius, captain of the guard; Carroway, the court’s master bard; and Harrtuck, a member of the royal guard. Tris harbors a deep secret. In a land where spirits walk openly and influence the affairs of the living, he suspects he may be the mage heir to the power of his grandmother, Bava K’aa, once the greatest sorceress of her age. Such magic would make Tris a Summoner, the rarest of magic gifts, capable of arbitrating between the living and the dead.

The Winds of War by Herman Wouk:

Like no other masterpiece of historical fiction, Herman Wouk’s sweeping epic of World War II is the great novel of America’s Greatest Generation.

Wouk’s spellbinding narrative captures the tide of global events, as well as all the drama, romance, heroism, and tragedy of World War II; set against the backdrop of world events from 1938 through the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Follows naval officer Victor “Pug” Henry as he is sent to Berlin as the U.S. Naval attaché. Shows how “Pug” and his family are drawn into the center of the conflicts that lead to America’s involvement in World War II as Germany expands and proceeds to seize several border countries, Italy attempts to establish a Fascist colonial empire under Mussolini, and Japan prepares for a major battle with China.

The Winds of War and its sequel War and Remembrance stand as the crowning achievement of one of America’s most celebrated storytellers.

The Winds of War and its sequel, War And Remembrance were turned into two terrific and lengthy mini-series in the 1980s, both of which may be checked out on DVD, so if you like history and are looking for videos to binge watch, check these out!

Set 1: The Winds of War

Set 2: War And Remembrance, Part I (Parts I – VII)

Set 3: War And Remembrance, Part II (The Final Chapter, Parts VIII – XII)

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

References

Herman Wouk Wrote Historical Novels. But His True Subject Was Moral Weakness. written by Adelle Waldman May 17, 2019,

StarCat

The catalog of physical library materials, i.e. print books, audiobooks on CD, DVDs etc.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content, i.e. eBooks & downloadable audiobooks, on PCs, Macs and mobile devices.

For mobile devices simply download the Libby (eBooks & downloadable audiobooks) or the RB Digital app (on-demand magazines), from your app store to get started. And if you’re using a PC or Mac simply click on the following link: https://stls.overdrive.com/

If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers January 19, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the upcoming week.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the book(s) of your choice.

FICTION:

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

 

 

BLOOD OF ELVES by Andrzej Sapkowski:

The first book in the Witcher series. As war looms, Geralt of Rivia must protect the prophesied savior of the world.

 

 

BLUE MOON by Lee Child:

Jack Reacher gets caught up in a turf war between Ukrainian and Albanian gangs.

 

 

CRISS CROSS by James Patterson:

The 27th book in the Alex Cross series. Copycat crimes make the detective question whether an innocent man was executed.

 

DAISY JONES & THE SIX by Taylor Jenkins Reid:

A fictional oral history charting the rise and fall of a ’70s rock ’n’ roll band.

 

 

THE DUTCH HOUSE by Ann Patchett:

A sibling relationship is impacted when the family goes from poverty to wealth and back again over the course of many decades.

 

 

THE GIVER OF STARS by Jojo Moyes:

In Depression-era America, five women refuse to be cowed by men or convention as they deliver books throughout the mountains of Kentucky.

 

 

THE GUARDIANS by John Grisham:

Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

 

 

THE LAST WISH by Andrzej Sapkowski:

Linked stories follow the exploits of Geralt of Rivia, a monster-slaying mercenary.

 

 

A MINUTE TO MIDNIGHT by David Baldacci:

When Atlee Pine returns to her hometown to investigate her sister’s kidnapping from 30 years ago, she winds up tracking a potential serial killer.

 

 

THE NIGHT FIRE by Michael Connelly:

Harry Bosch and Renée Ballard return to take up a case that held the attention of Bosch’s mentor.

 

 

OLIVE, AGAIN by Elizabeth Strout:

In a follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Olive Kitteridge,” new relationships, including a second marriage, are encountered in a seaside town in Maine.

 

 

THE SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides:

Theo Faber looks into the mystery of a famous painter who stops speaking after shooting her husband.

 

 

THE STARLESS SEA by Erin Morgenstern:

Zachary Ezra Rawlins fights to save a labyrinthine underground repository of stories.

 

 

SUCH A FUN AGE by Kiley Reid:

Tumult ensues when Alix Chamberlain’s babysitter is mistakenly accused of kidnapping her charge.

 

 

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

 

 

THE TESTAMENTS by Margaret Atwood:

In a sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale,” old secrets bring three women together as the Republic of Gilead’s theocratic regime shows signs of decay.

 

 

TWISTED TWENTY-SIX by Janet Evanovich:

The 26th book in the Stephanie Plum series. A New Jersey gangster’s associates go after a bounty hunter’s widowed grandmother.

 

 

THE WATER DANCER by Ta-Nehisi Coates:

A young man who was gifted with a mysterious power becomes part of a war between slavers and the enslaved.

 

 

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

 

 

THE WIVES by Tarryn Fisher:

A woman discovers something disturbing about her polygamist husband.

 

 

NON-FICTION:

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

 

 

BLOWOUT by Rachel Maddow:

The MSNBC host argues that the global oil and gas industry has weakened democracies and bolstered authoritarians.

 

 

THE BODY by Bill Bryson:

An owner’s manual of the human body covering various parts, functions and what happens when things go wrong.

 

 

THE BODY KEEPS THE SCORE by Bessel van der Kolk:

How trauma affects the body and mind, and innovative treatments for recovery.

 

 

THE BOOK OF GUTSY WOMEN by Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton:

Profiles of women from around the world who have blazed trails and challenged the status quo.

 

 

CATCH AND KILL by Ronan Farrow:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter details some surveillance and intimidation tactics used to pressure journalists and elude consequences by certain wealthy and connected men.

 

 

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

 

 

FINDING CHIKA by Mitch Albom:

Lessons learned by the Alboms when they bring a Haitian orphan with a life-threatening illness into their family.

 

 

HOW TO DO NOTHING by Jenny Odell:

An argument for unplugging from technology in order to potentially focus attention on important matters.

 

 

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

A law professor and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

 

 

THE LIBRARY BOOK by Susan Orlean:

The story of the 1986 fire at the Los Angeles Public Library provides a backdrop to the evolution and purpose of libraries.

 

 

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

 

 

ME by Elton John:

The multi-award-winning solo artist’s first autobiography chronicles his career, relationships and private struggles.

 

 

MIDNIGHT IN CHERNOBYL by Adam Higginbotham:

An account of the 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, based on hundreds of hours of interviews.

 

 

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

 

 

SAM HOUSTON AND THE ALAMO AVENGERS by Brian Kilmeade:

The “Fox & Friends” host gives an account of the battle against the Mexican Army in 1836.

 

 

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

 

 

SAY NOTHING by Patrick Radden:

A look at the conflict in Northern Ireland known as the Troubles.

 

 

TALKING TO STRANGERS by Malcolm Gladwell:

Famous examples of miscommunication serve as the backdrop to explain potential conflicts and misunderstandings.

 

 

A WARNING by Anonymous:

A senior official in the Trump administration offers an assessment of the president and makes a moral appeal.

 

 

WHY WE SLEEP by Matthew Walker:

A neuroscientist uses recent scientific discoveries to explain the functions of sleep and dreams.

 

 

THE YELLOW HOUSE by Sarah M. Broom:

Identity and inequality are explored in the history of a family and home in New Orleans both before and after Hurricane Katrina.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Note: this list contains all the New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that are owned by libraries within the Southern Tier Library System.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening January 10, 2020

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations of the week!

(Click on the Book/eBook/CD/DVD or book cover to request the item)

Days On Earth (2019) by Mark Lockheart (Genre: Jazz, Rock)

British Saxophonist Mark Lockheart latest rock flavored jazz LP.

Song List:

  1. A View From Above
  2. Brave World
  3. This Much I Know Is True
  4. Party Animal
  5. Believers
  6. Triana
  7. Long Way Gone

Imperfect Circle (2019) by Hootie & The Blowfish (Genre: Country, Pop)

The sixth album by the popular country/rockers and their first in fourteen years.

Song List:

  1. New Year’s Day
  2. Miss California
  3. Wildfire Love
  4. Hold On
  5. Turn It Up
  6. Not Tonight
  7. We Are One
  8. Everybody but You
  9. Lonely on a Saturday Night

Keep The Beat: The Very Best Of The English Beat (2012) by The English Beat:

A greatest hits collection by the eighties pop band best known for their hit Save It For Later.

  1. Mirror In the Bathroom
  2. Doors of Your Heart
  3. Save It For Later
  4. Twist & Crawl
  5. Tears of a Clown
  6. Best Friend
  7. I Confess
  8. Ranking Full Stop
  9. Whine & Grine/Stand Down Margaret

Still Crazy After All These Years (1975) by Paul Simon (Genre: Classic Rock, Folk):

A classic album by the prolific singer songwriter.

Song List:

  1. Still Crazy After All These Years
  2. My Little Town
  3. I Do It For Your Love
  4. 50 Ways To Leave Your Lover
  5. Night Game
  6. Gone At Last
  7. Some Folks’ Lives Roll Easy
  8. Have a Good Time
  9. You’re Kind

The Tree (2018) by Lori McKenna (Genre: Folk):

The latest release by the sing Boston singer songwriter.

Song List:

  1. A Mother Never Rests
  2. The Fixer
  3. People Get Old
  4. Young and Angry Again
  5. The Tree
  6. You Won’t Even Know I’m Gone
  7. Happy People
  8. You Can’t Break a Woman
  9. The Lot Behind St. Mary’s
  10. The Way Back Home
  11. Like Patsy Would

Videos Of The Week:

Believers from Days On Earth by Mark Lockheart

 

 

This Much I Know Is True by Mark Lockheart

 

 

New Year’s Day by Hootie & The Blowfish

 

 

Wildfire Love by Hootie & The Blowfish

 

 

I Confess by The English Beat

 

 

Save It For Later by The English Beat

 

 

Have A Good Time by Paul Simon

 

 

Still Crazy After All These Years by Paul Simon

 

 

People Get Old by Lori McKenna

 

 

The Tree by Lori McKenna

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS: Libby & RBDigital:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the Libby and/or the RBDigital app, to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers January 12, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the upcoming week.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the book(s) of your choice.

FICTION:

BLOOD OF ELVES by Andrzej Sapkowski:

The first book in the Witcher series. As war looms, Geralt of Rivia must protect the prophesied savior of the world.

 

 

BLUE MOON by Lee Child:

Jack Reacher gets caught up in a turf war between Ukrainian and Albanian gangs.

 

 

CRISS CROSS by James Patterson:

The 27th book in the Alex Cross series. Copycat crimes make the detective question whether an innocent man was executed.

 

 

THE DUTCH HOUSE by Ann Patchett:

A sibling relationship is impacted when the family goes from poverty to wealth and back again over the course of many decades.

 

 

THE GIVER OF STARS by Jojo Moyes:

In Depression-era America, five women refuse to be cowed by men or convention as they deliver books throughout the mountains of Kentucky.

 

 

THE GUARDIANS by John Grisham:

Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

 

 

THE LAST WISH by Andrzej Sapkowski:

Linked stories follow the exploits of Geralt of Rivia, a monster-slaying mercenary.

 

 

A MINUTE TO MIDNIGHT by David Baldacci:

When Atlee Pine returns to her hometown to investigate her sister’s kidnapping from 30 years ago, she winds up tracking a potential serial killer.

 

 

THE NIGHT FIRE by Michael Connelly:

Harry Bosch and Renée Ballard return to take up a case that held the attention of Bosch’s mentor.

 

 

OLIVE, AGAIN by Elizabeth Strout:

In a follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Olive Kitteridge,” new relationships, including a second marriage, are encountered in a seaside town in Maine.

 

 

THE SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides:

Theo Faber looks into the mystery of a famous painter who stops speaking after shooting her husband.

 

 

THE STARLESS SEA by Erin Morgenstern:

Zachary Ezra Rawlins fights to save a labyrinthine underground repository of stories.

 

 

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

 

 

THE TESTAMENTS by Margaret Atwood:

In a sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale,” old secrets bring three women together as the Republic of Gilead’s theocratic regime shows signs of decay.

 

 

TOM CLANCY: CODE OF HONOR by Marc Cameron:

President Jack Ryan learns of a plot against America when he tries to help an old friend who has been arrested in Indonesia.

 

 

TWISTED TWENTY-SIX by Janet Evanovich:

The 26th book in the Stephanie Plum series. A New Jersey gangster’s associates go after a bounty hunter’s widowed grandmother.

 

 

THE WATER DANCER by Ta-Nehisi Coates:

A young man who was gifted with a mysterious power becomes part of a war between slavers and the enslaved.

 

 

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

 

 

NON-FICTION:

 

THE BEAUTIFUL ONES by Prince. Edited by Dan Piepenbring:

A memoir by the musician written before his death, with photos and other memorabilia showing his evolution.

 

 

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

 

 

BLOWOUT by Rachel Maddow:

The MSNBC host argues that the global oil and gas industry has weakened democracies and bolstered authoritarians.

 

 

THE BODY by Bill Bryson:

An owner’s manual of the human body covering various parts, functions and what happens when things go wrong.

 

 

THE BOOK OF GUTSY WOMEN by Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton:

Profiles of women from around the world who have blazed trails and challenged the status quo.

 

 

CATCH AND KILL by Ronan Farrow:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter details some surveillance and intimidation tactics used to pressure journalists and elude consequences by certain wealthy and connected men.

 

 

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

 

 

FINDING CHIKA by Mitch Albom:

Lessons learned by the Alboms when they bring a Haitian orphan with a life-threatening illness into their family.

 

 

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

A law professor and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

 

 

ME by Elton John:

The multi-award-winning solo artist’s first autobiography chronicles his career, relationships and private struggles.

 

 

NO ONE IS TOO SMALL TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE by Greta Thunberg:

Speeches by the Swedish climate activist, including her address to the United Nations.

 

 

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

 

 

SAM HOUSTON AND THE ALAMO AVENGERS by Brian Kilmeade:

The “Fox & Friends” host gives an account of the battle against the Mexican Army in 1836.

 

 

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

 

 

TALKING TO STRANGERS by Malcolm Gladwell:

Famous examples of miscommunication serve as the backdrop to explain potential conflicts and misunderstandings.

 

 

TRIGGERED by Donald Trump Jr.:

Forays into politics and views on liberals from the executive vice president of the Trump Organization.

 

 

A WARNING by Anonymous:

A senior official in the Trump administration offers an assessment of the president and makes a moral appeal.

 

 

THE WAY I HEARD IT by Mike Rowe:

The television personality relays stories from his podcast and personal anecdotes.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Note: this list contains all the New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that are owned by libraries within the Southern Tier Library System.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading January 6, 2020

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audiobooks, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG RECOMMENDATIONS:

Good Riddance written by Elinor Lipman and read by Mia Barron (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

Daphne Maritch doesn’t quite know what to make of the heavily-annotated high-school yearbook she inherits from her mother. The late June Winter Maritch was the teacher to whom the class of ’69 had dedicated its yearbook, and she, in turn, went on to attend every reunion. Each year, she scribbled notes and observations after each one—not always charitably—and noted who overstepped boundaries of many kinds. In a fit of de-cluttering, Daphne throws the yearbook away. But when it’s found in the recycling bin by a neighbor/documentary filmmaker, the yearbook’s mysteries—not to mention her own family’s—take on a whole new urgency, and Daphne finds herself entangled in a series of events both poignant and absurd.

The Green Years by Karen Wolff (Format: eBook):

When eight-year-old Harry Spencer’s father returns from WWI with a missing arm, his father’s bitterness shatters their relationship. Though confused and brokenhearted, Harry is determined to make something of himself. Endeavoring with heart and sometimes-humorous results, he sets out on his path in life, working in his granddad’s store, selling medicinal salves, washing windows, and falling in love.

This historical coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of small-town life will tug at your heartstrings as Harry discovers who he is, who his father is, and how to heal the past.

I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening) A Guide to Grace-Filled Political Conversations by Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth A. Silvers (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

Two friends on opposite sides of the aisle provide a practical guide to grace-filled political conversation while challenging readers to put relationship before policy and understanding before argument.

More than ever, politics seems driven by conflict and anger. People sitting together in pews every Sunday have started to feel like strangers, loved ones at the dinner table like enemies. Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers say there is a better way.

As working moms on opposite ends of the political spectrum and hosts of a fast-growing politics podcast, Holland and Silvers have learned how to practice engaging conversation while disagreeing. In I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening), they share principles on how to give grace and be vulnerable when discussing issues that affect families, churches, the country, and the world.

The Long Flight Home by Alan Hlad (Format: eBook):

It is September 1940—a year into the war—and as German bombs fall on Britain, fears grow of an impending invasion. Enemy fighter planes blacken the sky around the Epping Forest home of Susan Shepherd and her grandfather, Bertie. After losing her parents to influenza as a child, Susan found comfort in raising homing pigeons with Bertie. All her birds are extraordinary to Susan—loyal, intelligent, beautiful—but none more so than Duchess. Hatched from an egg that Susan incubated in a bowl under her grandfather’s desk lamp, Duchess shares a special bond with Susan and an unusual curiosity about the human world.

Thousands of miles away in Buxton, Maine, a young crop-duster pilot named Ollie Evans has decided to travel to Britain to join the Royal Air Force. His quest brings him to Epping and to the National Pigeon Service, where Susan is involved in a new, covert assignment. Codenamed Source Columba, the mission aims to air-drop hundreds of homing pigeons in German-occupied France. Many will not survive. Those that do make the journey home to England can convey crucial information on German troop movements—and help reclaim the skies from the Luftwaffe.

The friendship between Ollie and Susan deepens as the mission date draws near. When Ollie’s plane is downed behind enemy lines, both know how remote the chances of reunion must be. Yet Duchess’s devotion and her singular sense of duty will become an unexpected lifeline, relaying messages between Susan and Ollie as war rages on—and proving, at last, that hope is never truly lost.

Peculiar Questions and Practical Answers: A Little Book of Whimsy and Wisdom from the Files of the New York Public Library by New York Public Library & Barry Blitt (Format: eBook):

Have you’ve ever wondered if you can keep an octopus in a private home? Do you spend your time thinking about how much Napoleon’s brain weighed? If so, Peculiar Questions and Practical Answers is the book for you. The New York Public Library has been fielding questions like these ever since it was founded in 1895. Of course, some of the questions have left the librarians scratching their heads…

“In what occupations may one be barefooted?”
“What time does a bluebird sing?”
“What does it mean when you’re being chased by an elephant?”
“What kind of apple did Eve eat?”
“How many neurotic people are there in the U.S.?”

In Peculiar Questions and Practical Answers, the staff of the NYPL has dug through the archives to find thoughtful and often witty answers to over one hundred of the oddest, funniest, and most whimsical questions the library has received since it began record-keeping over seventy-five years ago. One of The New Yorker’s best-known and beloved illustrators, Barry Blitt, has created watercolors that bring many of the questions hilariously to life in a book that answers, among others, the question “Does anyone have a copyright on the Bible?”

The Tiger’s Prey by Wilbur Smith & Tom Harper (Format: eBook):

The New York Times bestselling author of Desert God and Pharaoh adds another chapter to his popular historical saga featuring the seafaring Tom Courtney, the hero of Monsoon and Blue Horizon, with this magnificent swashbuckling saga set in the eighteenth century and packed with action, violence, romance, and rousing adventure.

Tom Courtney, one of four sons of master mariner Sir Hal Courtney, once again sets sail on a treacherous journey that will take him across the vast reaches of the ocean and pit him against dangerous enemies in exotic destinations. But just as the winds propel his sails, passion drives his heart. Turning his ship towards the unknown, Tom Courtney will ultimately find his destiny—and lay the future for the Courtney family.

Wilbur Smith, the world’s greatest storyteller, once again recreates all the drama, uncertainty, and courage of a bygone era in this thrilling saga of the sea.

PRINT RECOMMENDATIONS:

10 Women Who Changed Science And The World by Catherine Whitlock & Rhodri Evans:

From two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie to physicist Chien-Shiung Wu and obstetrical anesthesiologist Virginia Apgar, M.D., this book celebrates the lives and hard-earned accomplishments of ten women from around the world who forever changed astronomy, physics, chemistry, medicine, and biology.

It has been more than a century since the Nobel Prize in science was first awarded to a woman. And after Marie Curie’s 1911 accolade, seventeen other women—including two in 2018—have been so honored (Curie won the award a second time). This book explores the lives of Curie, three other female Nobel Prize winners, and six other women who broke through gender discrimination in a variety of fields to help shape our world with their extraordinary discoveries and inventions.

What drove these remarkable women to cure previously incurable diseases, disprove existing theories, or identify new sources of energy? Despite living during periods when the contribution of women was often disregarded, if not ignored, these resilient women persevered with their research. By daring to ask “How?” and “Why?” and laboring against the odds, each of these women, in her own way, made the world a better place.

The Scientists:
1. Virginia Apgar
2. Rachel Carson
3. Marie Curie
4. Gertrude Elion
5. Dorothy Hodgkin
6. Henrietta Leavitt
7. Rita Levi-Montalcini
8. Lise Meitner
9. Elsie Widdowson
10. Chen-shiung Wu

The American Short Story: A Collection Of The Best Known And Most Memorable Short Stories By The Great American Authors:

This entertaining collection–a panoramic survey of American literature–presents over two hundred years of great American short stories in more than 1,000 pages. From Washington Irving to Joyce Carol Oates, our nation’s best writers are showcased at the top of their form.
Selections from America’s first great quartet of fiction writers–Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe and Herman Melville–open this extraordinary volume and reflect the birth of a distinctly American literature. The short story form blossomed during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, giving rise to superb works of realism, naturalism, and regionalism. The American Short Story explores these traditions fully, with a wonderful sampling of writings from Ambrose Bierce, Edward Everett Hale, Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Sarah Orne Jewett, Joel Chandler Harris, Frank Norris, Stephen Crane, Theodore Drieser, Henry James, Edith Wharton and many others. Stories like F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “Babylon Revisited” and Ernest Hemingway’s “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” capture the brilliance of “The Lost Generation” writers; the rich tradition of Southern storytelling come to life in works by William Faulkner, Katherine Anne Porter, Eudora Welty, Thomas Wolfe, and Flannery O’Connor; and, in works ranging from the sentimental to the satirical, the hard-hitting to the hilarious, writers like Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, John Updike, and Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. illuminate the experiences of America’s extraordinarily diverse population.

Auntie Poldi And The Vineyards of Etna by Mario Giordano:

When prosecco-loving Auntie Poldi retired to Sicily from Germany, she never dreamt her tranquil days would be interrupted by murder. But Sicily had other plans, and Poldi found herself honor-bound to solve the disappearance of her beloved (and cute) handyman. Now, she’s finally ready for some peace and quiet–interrupted by romantic encounters with handsome Chief Inspector Montana, of course–when the water supply to her neighborhood is cut off and a dear friend’s dog is poisoned, tell-tale signs that a certain familial organization is flexing their muscle. Poldi knows there will be no resolution without her help. She soon finds a body in a vineyard, tangles with the Mafia, and yet again makes herself unpopular in the pursuit of justice. But once wine and murder mix, how could she possibly stay away?

Mary Bell Washington: The Story Of George Washington’s Mother by Craig Shirley:

The Mother of the Father of our Country.

Mary Ball Washington was an unlikely candidate to be the mother of history’s most famous revolutionary. In fact, George Washington’s first fight for independence was from his controlling, singular mother.

Stubborn, aristocratic Mary Ball Washington was entrenched in the Old World ways of her ancestors, dismissing the American experiment even as her son led the successful rebellion against the crown. During his youth, ambitious George dove into the hard-scrabble work of a surveyor and rose through the ranks of the fledgling colonial army, even as his overprotective mother tried to discourage these efforts.

Mary’s influence on George was twofold. Though she raised her eldest son to become one of the world’s greatest leaders, Mary also tried many times to hold him back. While she passed down her strength and individuality to George, she also sought to protect him from the risks he needed to take to become a daring general and president. But it was this resistance itself which fanned the spark of George’s independence into a flame. The constant tug of war between the two throughout the early years helped define George’s character.

In Mary Ball Washington, New York Times bestselling author Craig Shirley uncovers startling details about the inner workings of the Washington family. He vividly brings to life a resilient widow who singlehandedly raised six children and ran a large farm at a time when most women’s duties were relegated to household matters. Throughout, Shirley compares and contrasts mother and son, illuminating the qualities they shared and the differences that divided them.

A significant contribution to American history, Mary Ball Washington is the definitive take on the relationship between George and Mary Washington, offering fresh insight into this extraordinary figure who would shape our nation—and the woman who shaped him.

Strange Tombs by Syd Moore:

Halloween in Essex and the Mystery and Suspense creative writing course at old Ratchette Hall is off to a satisfyingly creepy start. But things take a turn for the worse when the course administrator is discovered dead, clutching a marble finger to his chest. For why would anyone, undead or alive, want to kill mild-mannered Graham? Luckily Rosie Strange and Sam Stone are on the case. Soon, however, they are digging up more questions than answers: who are the unearthly howls emanating from neighbouring Witch Wood every night? How has a stone crusader, on display in the church, managed to lose a finger? And, more sinister yet, why is one of the tombs missing a corpse?

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

StarCat

The catalog of physical library materials, i.e. print books, audiobooks on CD, DVDs etc.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content, i.e. eBooks & downloadable audiobooks, on PCs, Macs and mobile devices.

For mobile devices simply download the Libby (eBooks & downloadable audiobooks) or the RB Digital app (on-demand magazines), from your app store to get started. And if you’re using a PC or Mac simply click on the following link: https://stls.overdrive.com/

If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading December 30, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audiobooks, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG RECOMMENDATIONS:

Been So Long: My Life and Music written by Jorma Kaukonen and narrated by Grace Slick, Jack Cassidy & Jorma Kaukonen (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

*This program includes a foreword written and read by Grace Slick, and an afterword written and read by Jack Casady*

From the man who made a name for himself as a founding member and lead guitarist of Jefferson Airplane comes a memoir that offers a rare glimpse into the heart and soul of a musical genius—and a vivid journey through the psychedelic era in America.

“Music is the reward for being alive,” writes Jorma Kaukonen in this candid and emotional account of his life and work. “It stirs memory in a singular way that is unmatched.” In a career that has already spanned a half century—one that has earned him induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, among other honors—Jorma is best known for his legendary bands Jefferson Airplane and the still-touring Hot Tuna. But before he won worldwide recognition he was just a young man with a passion and a dream.

Been So Long is the story of how Jorma found his place in the world of music and beyond. The grandson of Finnish and Russian-Jewish immigrants whose formative years were spent abroad with his American-born diplomat father, Jorma channeled his life experiences—from his coming-of-age in Pakistan and the Philippines to his early gigs with Jack Casady in D.C. to his jam sessions in San Francisco with Jerry Garcia, Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan, and other contemporaries—into his art in unique and revelatory ways.

Been So Long charts not only Jorma’s association with the bands that made him famous but goes into never-before-told details about his addiction and recovery, his troubled first marriage and still-thriving second, and more. Interspersed with diary entries, personal correspondence, and song lyrics, this memoir is as unforgettable and inspiring as Jorma’s music itself.

This program includes live bonus music.

Inland written by Téa Obreht and read by Anna Chlumsky, Edoardo Ballerini & Euan Morton (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Time • The Washington Post • Entertainment Weekly • Esquire • Real Simple • Good Housekeeping • The New York Public Library • The Dallas Morning News • Kirkus Reviews • Library Journal • BookPage

In the lawless, drought-ridden lands of the Arizona Territory in 1893, two extraordinary lives unfold. Nora is an unflinching frontierswoman awaiting the return of the men in her life—her husband, who has gone in search of water for the parched household, and her elder sons, who have vanished after an explosive argument. Nora is biding her time with her youngest son, who is convinced that a mysterious beast is stalking the land around their home.

Meanwhile, Lurie is a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts. He sees lost souls who want something from him, and he finds reprieve from their longing in an unexpected relationship that inspires a momentous expedition across the West. The way in which Lurie’s death-defying trek at last intersects with Nora’s plight is the surprise and suspense of this brilliant novel.

Mythical, lyrical, and sweeping in scope, Inland is grounded in true but little-known history. It showcases all of Téa Obreht’s talents as a writer, as she subverts and reimagines the myths of the American West, making them entirely—and unforgettably—her own.

Praise for Inland
“As it should be, the landscape of the West itself is a character, thrillingly rendered throughout. . . . Here, Obreht’s simple but rich prose captures and luxuriates in the West’s beauty and sudden menace. Remarkable in a novel with such a sprawling cast, Obreht also has a poetic touch for writing intricate and precise character descriptions.”—The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice)

“Beautifully wrought.”—Vanity Fair

A Midwinter’s Tail written by Sofie Kelly and read by Cassandra Campbell (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

Kathleen Paulson is snowed under running her library and caring for her extraordinary felines, Owen and Hercules. But when a fund-raiser turns deadly, she’ll have to add sleuthing to her already full schedule….

Winter in Mayville Heights is busy and not just because of the holidays. Kathleen is hard at work organizing a benefit to raise money for the library’s popular Reading Buddies program. She has her hands full hosting the event. And when a guest at the gala drops dead, her magical cats, Owen and Hercules, will have their paws full helping her solve a murder.

The victim is the ex of town rascal Burtis Chapman, but she hasn’t lived in the area in years. And though everybody is denying knowledge of why she was back in town, as Kathleen and her detective boyfriend, Marcus, begin nosing around, they discover more people are connected to the deceased than claimed to be. Now Marcus, Kathleen, and her uncanny cats have to unravel this midwinter tale before the case gets cold.

A Nearly Normal Family: A Novel written by M.T. Edvardsson and read by Rachel Willson-Broyles, Georgia Maguire and Emily Watson (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

New York Times Book Review recommends M.T. Edvardsson’s A Nearly Normal Family and lauds it as a “page-turner” that forces the reader to confront “the compromises we make with ourselves to be the people we believe our beloveds expect.” (NYTimes Book Review Summer Reading Issue)

M.T. Edvardsson’s A Nearly Normal Family is a gripping legal thriller that forces the listener to consider: How far would you go to protect the ones you love? In this twisted narrative of love and murder, a horrific crime makes a seemingly normal family question everything they thought they knew about their life—and one another.

Eighteen-year-old Stella Sandell stands accused of the brutal murder of a man almost fifteen years her senior. She is an ordinary teenager from an upstanding local family. What reason could she have to know a shady businessman, let alone to kill him?

Stella’s father, a pastor, and mother, a criminal defense attorney, find their moral compasses tested as they defend their daughter, while struggling to understand why she is a suspect. Told in an unusual three-part structure, A Nearly Normal Family asks the questions: How well do you know your own children? How far would you go to protect them?

A Vision in Velvet written by Juliet Blackwell and read by Xe Sands (format: Downloadable Audiobook):

As soon as Lily opens her recently purchased trunk of old clothes, she feels strange vibrations emanating from a mysterious velvet cloak. When she tries it on, Lily sees awful visions from the past. And when the antiques dealer who sold her the cape is killed, Lily suspects a supernatural force might be behind his death. Then Lily’s familiar, Oscar the potbellied pig, disappears. Lily will do anything to get him back-including battling the spirit of a powerful witch reaching out from the past. But even with the aid of her grandmother, unmasking a killer and saving Oscar might be more than one well-intentioned sorceress can handle.

PRINT RECOMMENDATIONS:

Information Wars: How We Lost The Global Battle Against Disinformation & What We Can Do About It by Richard Stengel:

Abstract: “In February of 2013, Richard Stengel, the former editor-in-chief of Time, joined the Obama administration as Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs. Within days, two shocking events made world-wide headlines: ISIS executed American journalist James Foley on a graphic video seen by tens of millions, and Vladimir Putin’s “little green men”-Russian special forces-invaded Crimea, amid a blizzard of Russian denials and false flags. What these events had in common besides their violent law-lessness is that they were the opening salvos in a new era of global information war, where countries and non-state actors use social media and disinformation to create their own narratives and undermine anyone who opposes them.

Stengel was thrust onto the front lines of this battle as he was tasked with responding to the relentless weaponizing of information and grievance by ISIS, Russia, China, and others. He saw the scale of what he was up against and found himself hopelessly outgunned. Then, in 2016, the wars Stengel was fighting abroad came home during the presidential election, as “fake news” became a rallying cry and the Russians used the techniques they learned in Ukraine to influence the election here. Rarely has an accomplished journalist been not only a close observer but also a principal participant in the debates and decisions of American foreign policy. Stengel takes you behind the scenes in the ritualized world of diplomacy, from the daily 8:30 morning huddle with a restless John Kerry to a midnight sit-down in Saudi Arabia with the prince of darkness Mohammed bin Salman. The result is a rich account of a losing battle against trolls and bots-who are every bit as insidious as their names imply.”– Provided by publisher.

The Lost Causes of Bleak Creek: A Novel by Pat McLaughlin:

Abstract: “It’s 1992 in Bleak Creek, North Carolina, a sleepy little place with all the trappings of an ordinary Southern town: two Baptist churches, friendly smiles coupled with silent judgments, and an unquenchable appetite for pork products. Beneath the town’s cheerful façade, however, Bleak Creek teens live in constant fear of being sent to The Whitewood School, a local reformatory with a record of putting unruly teens back on the straight and narrow–a record so impeccable that almost everyone is willing to ignore the mysterious deaths that have occurred there over the past decade.

At first, high school freshmen Rex McClendon and Leif Nelson believe what they’ve been told: that the students’ strange demises were all just tragic accidents, the unfortunate consequence of succumbing to vices like Dungeons & Dragons and Nirvana. But when the shoot for their low-budget horror masterpiece, PolterDog, goes horribly awry–and their best friend, Alicia Boykins, is sent to Whitewood as punishment–Rex and Leif are forced to piece together the unsettling truth of the school and its mysterious founder, Wayne Whitewood. What the boys find–with recent NYU film school student Janine Blitstein and her cousin Donna (a former Whitewood student with secrets of her own) at their side–will leave them battling an evil beyond their wildest teenage imaginations, one that will shake Bleak Creek to its core”– Provided by publisher.

On Fire: The (Burning) Case For A Green New Deal by Naomi Klein:

Abstract: “For more than twenty years, Naomi Klein has been the foremost chronicler of the economic war waged on both people and planet-and an unapologetic champion of a sweeping environmental agenda with justice at its center. In lucid, elegant dispatches from the frontlines of contemporary natural disaster, she pens surging, indispensable essays for a wide public: prescient advisories and dire warnings of what future awaits us if we refuse to act, as well as hopeful glimpses of a far better future. On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal gathers for the first time more than a decade of her impassioned writing, and pairs it with new material on the staggeringly high stakes of our immediate political and economic choices. These long-form essays show Klein at her most prophetic and philosophical, investigating the climate crisis not only as a profound political challenge but as a spiritual and imaginative one, as well. Delving into topics ranging from the clash between ecological time and our culture of “perpetual now,” to the soaring history of humans changing and evolving rapidly in the face of grave threats, to rising white supremacy and fortressed borders as a form of “climate barbarism,” this is a rousing call to action for a planet on the brink. With reports spanning from the ghostly Great Barrier Reef, to the annual smoke-choked skies of the Pacific Northwest, to post-hurricane Puerto Rico, to a Vatican attempting an unprecedented “ecological conversion,” Klein makes the case that we will rise to the existential challenge of climate change only if we are willing to transform the systems that produced this crisis. An expansive, far-ranging exploration that sees the battle for a greener world as indistinguishable from the fight for our lives, On Fire captures the burning urgency of the climate crisis, as well as the fiery energy of a rising political movement demanding a catalytic Green New Deal”– Provided by publisher.

Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School by Jim Kristofic:

Abstract: “After the Indian wars, many Americans still believed that the only good Indian was a dead Indian. But at Ganado Mission in the Navajo country of northern Arizona, a group of missionaries and doctors–who cared less about saving souls and more about saving lives–chose a different way and persuaded the local parents and medicine men to allow them to educate their daughters as nurses. The young women struggled to step into the world of modern medicine, but they knew they might become nurses who could build a bridge between the old ways and the new. In this detailed history Jim Kristofic traces the story of Ganado Mission on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Kristofic’s personal connection with the community creates a nuanced historical understanding that blends engaging narrative with careful scholarship to share the stories of the people and their commitment to this place”– Provided by publisher.

Wasteland: The Great War and the Origins of Modern Horror by W. Scott Poole:

Abstract: “The roots of modern horror are found in the First World War. It was the most devastating event to occur in the early 1900s, with 38 million dead and 17 million wounded in the most grotesque of ways, owing to the new machines brought to war. If Downton Abbey showed the ripple effect of this catastrophe above stairs, Wasteland reveals how it made its way into the darker corners of our psyche on the bloody battlefield, the screaming asylum, and desolated cities and villages. Historian W. Scott Poole chronicles the era’s major figures and their influences–Freud, T.S. Eliot, H.P. Lovecraft, Wilfred Owen and Peter Lorre, David Cronenberg and Freddy Krueger–as well as cult favorites and the collective unconscious. Wasteland is a surprising–but wholly convincing–perspective on horror that also speaks to the audience for history, film, and popular culture. November 11th, 2018, is the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that brought the First World War to a close, and a number of smart and well-received recent histories have helped us reevaluate this conflict. Now W. Scott Poole takes us behind the frontlines of battle to the dark places of the imagination where the legacy of the war to end all wars lives on” — Provided by publisher.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

StarCat

The catalog of physical library materials, i.e. print books, audiobooks on CD, DVDs etc.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content, i.e. eBooks & downloadable audiobooks, on PCs, Macs and mobile devices.

For mobile devices simply download the Libby (eBooks & downloadable audiobooks) or the RB Digital app (on-demand magazines), from your app store to get started. And if you’re using a PC or Mac simply click on the following link: https://stls.overdrive.com/

If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.