Suggested Reading July 29, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Fated by Benedict Jacka (Format: eBook):

As the proprietor of a magic and novelty shop in London, Alex Verus spends his days catering to show and hobby magicians as well as a group of secret mages whose powers come from a source deeper than the mastery of tricks. Alex is a diviner, able to sense the future, and his talent has kept him away from both the Council—the official organization of mages of the “light”—and the mages who follow the path of darkness and personal power. But when a magical artifact turns up in a London museum, Alex finds his talents eagerly sought by both sides. VERDICT Jacka’s first novel presages an urban fantasy that relies less on erotic scenarios and more on classic action and problem solving. For fans of Jim Butcher’s “Dresden Files,” Tanya Huff’s “Blood” series, and Seanan McGuire’s “October Daye” series.” – Library Journal Review

“Harry Dresden would like Alex Verus tremendously—and be a little nervous around him. I just added Benedict Jacka to my must-read list.” —Jim Butcher

The Ghost Clause by Howard Norman (Format: eBook):

National Book Award Finalist Howard Norman delivers another “provocative . . . haunting”* novel, this time set in a Vermont village and featuring a missing child, a newly married private detective, and a highly relatable ghost –Janet Maslin, New York Times.

Simon Inescort is no longer bodily present in his marriage. It’s been several months since he keeled over the rail of a Nova Scotia–bound ferry, a massive heart attack to blame. Simon’s widow, Lorca Pell, has sold their farmhouse to newlyweds Zachary and Muriel—after revealing that the deed contains a “ghost clause,” an actual legal clause, not unheard of in Vermont, allowing for reimbursement if a recently purchased home turns out to be haunted.

In fact, Simon finds himself still at home: “Every waking moment, I’m astonished I have any consciousness . . . What am I to call myself now, a revenant?” He spends time replaying his marriage in his own mind, as if in poignant reel-to-reel, while also engaging in occasionally intimate observation of the new homeowners. But soon the crisis of a missing child, a local eleven-year-old, threatens the tenuous domestic equilibrium, as the weight of the case falls to Zachary, a rookie private detective with the Green Mountain Agency.

The Ghost Clause is a heartrending, affirming portrait of two marriages—one in its afterlife, one new and erotically charged—and of the Vermont village life that sustains and remakes them.

Growing Things and Other Stories by Paul Tremblay (Format: eBook):

A chilling collection of psychological suspense and literary horror from the multiple award-winning author of the national bestseller The Cabin at the End of the World and A Head Full of Ghosts.

A masterful anthology featuring nineteen pieces of short fiction, Growing Things is an exciting glimpse into Paul Tremblay’s fantastically fertile imagination.

In “The Teacher,” a Bram Stoker Award nominee for best short story, a student is forced to watch a disturbing video that will haunt and torment her and her classmates’ lives.

Four men rob a pawn shop at gunpoint only to vanish, one-by-one, as they speed away from the crime scene in “The Getaway.”

In “Swim Wants to Know If It’s as Bad as Swim Thinks,” a meth addict kidnaps her daughter from her estranged mother as their town is terrorized by a giant monster . . . or not.

Joining these haunting works are stories linked to Tremblay’s previous novels. The tour de force metafictional novella “Notes from the Dog Walkers” deconstructs horror and publishing, possibly bringing in a character from A Head Full of Ghosts, all while serving as a prequel to Disappearance at Devil’s Rock. “The Thirteenth Temple” follows another character from A Head Full of Ghosts—Merry, who has published a tell-all memoir written years after the events of the novel. And the title story, “Growing Things,” a shivery tale loosely shared between the sisters in A Head Full of Ghosts, is told here in full.

From global catastrophe to the demons inside our heads, Tremblay illuminates our primal fears and darkest dreams in startlingly original fiction that leaves us unmoored. As he lowers the sky and yanks the ground from beneath our feet, we are compelled to contemplate the darkness inside our own hearts and minds.

Lila written by Marilynne Robinson and narrated by Maggie Hoffman (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

“Starred Review This third of three novels set in the fictional plains town of Gilead, Iowa, is a masterpiece of prose in the service of the moral seriousness that distinguishes Robinson’s work . . . Lila is a superb creation. Largely uneducated, almost feral, Lila has a thirst for stability and knowledge. As she yearns to forget the terrible memories and shame of her past, Lila is hesitant to reveal them to her loving new husband. The courtship of the couple–John Ames: tentative, shy, and awkward; Lila: naïve, suspicious, wary, full of dread–will endure as a classic set piece of character revelation, during which two achingly lonely people discover the comfort of marital love . . . Robinson carefully crafts this provocative and deeply meaningful spiritual search for the meaning of existence. What brings the couple together is a joyous appreciation of the beauty of the natural world and the possibility of grace.” —Publishers Weekly Review

Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors: A Novel by Sonali Dev (Format: eBook):

Award-winning author Sonali Dev launches a new series about the Rajes, an immigrant Indian family descended from royalty, who have built their lives in San Francisco…

It is a truth universally acknowledged that only in an overachieving Indian American family can a genius daughter be considered a black sheep.

Dr. Trisha Raje is San Francisco’s most acclaimed neurosurgeon. But that’s not enough for the Rajes, her influential immigrant family who’s achieved power by making its own non-negotiable rules:

· Never trust an outsider

· Never do anything to jeopardize your brother’s political aspirations

· And never, ever, defy your family

Trisha is guilty of breaking all three rules. But now she has a chance to redeem herself. So long as she doesn’t repeat old mistakes.

Up-and-coming chef DJ Caine has known people like Trisha before, people who judge him by his rough beginnings and place pedigree above character. He needs the lucrative job the Rajes offer, but he values his pride too much to indulge Trisha’s arrogance. And then he discovers that she’s the only surgeon who can save his sister’s life.

As the two clash, their assumptions crumble like the spun sugar on one of DJ’s stunning desserts. But before a future can be savored there’s a past to be reckoned with…

A family trying to build home in a new land.

A man who has never felt at home anywhere.

And a choice to be made between the two.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

Bethlehem by Karen Kelly:

With the atmospheric storytelling of Kate Morton and Lisa Wingate, Karen Kelly weaves a shattering debut about two intertwined families and the secrets that they buried during the gilded, glory days of Bethlehem, PA.

A young woman arrives at the grand ancestral home of her husband’s family, hoping to fortify her deteriorating marriage. But what she finds is not what she expected: tragedy haunts the hallways, whispering of heartache and a past she never knew existed.

Bethlehem is a multi-generational saga that weaves together the lives of two prominent families during the historic steel boom era of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Inspired by the true titans of the industry, Bethlehem is a mystery, a love story, and a tragedy. It is a story of temptation and regret; a story of secrets and the cost of keeping them; a story of forgiveness. It is the tale of two complex women: the dynamic and beautiful Susannah Parrish Collier and her daughter-in-law, the outsider Joanna Rafferty Collier. Thrown together in the name of family, they will unravel mysteries long hidden and complex that have threatened to tear apart a dynasty.

The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger:

Smart and juicy, a compulsively readable novel about a previously happy group of friends and parents that is nearly destroyed by their own competitiveness when an exclusive school for gifted children opens in the community.

This deliciously sharp novel captures the relentless ambitions and fears that animate parents and their children in modern America, exploring the conflicts between achievement and potential, talent and privilege.

Set in the fictional town of Crystal, Colorado, The Gifted School is a keenly entertaining novel that observes the drama within a community of friends and parents as good intentions and high ambitions collide in a pile-up with long-held secrets and lies. Seen through the lens of four families who’ve been a part of one another’s lives since their kids were born over a decade ago, the story reveals not only the lengths that some adults are willing to go to get ahead, but the effect on the group’s children, sibling relationships, marriages, and careers, as simmering resentments come to a boil and long-buried, explosive secrets surface and detonate. It’s a humorous, keenly observed, timely take on ambitious parents, willful kids, and the pursuit of prestige, no matter the cost.

The Lost Letters of William Woolf by Helen Cullen:

Lost letters have only one hope for survival…

Inside the walls of the Dead Letters Depot, letter detectives work to solve mysteries. They study missing zip codes, illegible handwriting, rain-smudged ink, lost address labels, torn packages, forgotten street names—all the many twists of fate behind missed birthdays, broken hearts, unheard confessions, pointless accusations, unpaid bills, unanswered prayers. Their mission is to unite lost mail with its intended recipients.

But when letters arrive addressed simply to “My Great Love,” longtime letter detective William Woolf faces his greatest mystery to date. Written by a woman to the soul mate she hasn’t met yet, the missives capture William’s heart in ways he didn’t know possible. Soon, he finds himself torn between the realities of his own marriage and his world of letters, and his quest to follow the clues becomes a life-changing journey of love, hope and courage.

The Lost Letters of William Woolf is an enchanting novel about the resilience of the human heart and the complex ideas we hold about love—and a passionate ode to the art of letter writing.

Midnight at the Blackbird Café by Heather Webber:

Heather Webber’s Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe is a captivating blend of magical realism, heartwarming romance, and small-town Southern charm.

Nestled in the mountain shadows of Alabama lies the little town of Wicklow. It is here that Anna Kate has returned to bury her beloved Granny Zee, owner of the Blackbird Café.

It was supposed to be a quick trip to close the café and settle her grandmother’s estate, but despite her best intentions to avoid forming ties or even getting to know her father’s side of the family, Anna Kate finds herself inexplicably drawn to the quirky Southern town her mother ran away from so many years ago, and the mysterious blackbird pie everybody can’t stop talking about.

As the truth about her past slowly becomes clear, Anna Kate will need to decide if this lone blackbird will finally be able to take her broken wings and fly.

Wild and Crazy Guys: How the Comedy Mavericks of the ’80s Changed Hollywood Forever by Nick de Semlyen:

Wild and Crazy Guys opens in 1978 with Chevy Chase and Bill Murray taking bad-tempered swings at each other backstage at Saturday Night Live, and closes 21 years later with the two doing a skit in the same venue, poking fun at each other, their illustrious careers, triumphs and prat falls. In between, Nick de Semlyen takes us on a trip through the tumultuous ’80s, delving behind the scenes of movies such as National Lampoon’s Vacation, Beverly Hills Cop, The Blues Brothers, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, and dozens more. Chronicling the off-screen, larger-than-life antics of Bill Murray, Chevy Chase, Steve Martin, Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy, John Belushi, John Candy, and Rick Moranis, it’s got drugs, sex, punch-ups, webbed toes, and Bill Murray being pushed into a swimming pool by Hunter S. Thompson while tied to a lawn chair. What’s not to like?

Based on candid interviews from many of the stars themselves, as well as those in their immediate orbit, including directors John Landis, Carl Reiner, and Amy Heckerling, Wild and Crazy Guys is a fantastic insider account of the friendships, feuds, triumphs, and disasters experienced by these beloved comedians. Hilarious and revealing, it is both a hidden history of the most fertile period ever for screen comedy and a celebration of some of the most popular films of all time.

Praise for Wild and Crazy Guys

“Eminently readable . . . Children of the 1980s, take note: this is a fond, engrossing look back at the making of movies that became cultural touchstones.”—Booklist (starred review)

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial-free music each day:

RBDigital

*Magazines are available for free and on demand! You can check out magazines and read them on your computer or download the RBDigital app from your app store and read them on your mobile devices.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or RB Digital app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers August 4, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that ends August 4, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

BACKLASH by Brad Thor:

Cut off from any support, Scot Harvath fights to get his revenge.

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

THE CHAIN by Adrian McKinty

Rachel Klein is ensnared in a pay-it-forward criminal enterprise involving ransoms and kidnapping.

CITY OF GIRLS by Elizabeth Gilbert:

An 89-year-old Vivian Morris looks back at the direction her life took when she entered the 1940s New York theater scene.

EVVIE DRAKE STARTS OVER by Linda Holmes:

In a seaside town in Maine, a former Major League pitcher and a grieving widow assess their pasts.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

LOST AND FOUND by Danielle Steel:

A photographer embarks on a road trip to reconnect with three men she might have married.

MRS. EVERYTHING by Jennifer Weiner: 

The story of two sisters, Jo and Bethie Kaufman, and their life experiences as the world around them changes drastically from the 1950s.

NEW GIRL by Daniel Silva:

Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter is kidnapped.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

THE RECKONING by John Grisham:

A decorated World War II veteran shoots and kills a pastor inside a Mississippi church.

RED METAL by Mark Greaney and Hunter Ripley Rawlings IV: 

After a Russian military attack, a small team of American and European soldiers unite against them.

SHAMED by Linda Castillo:

An Amish family’s secrets are exposed when the grandmother is murdered and granddaughter is abducted.

SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides:

Theo Faber looks into the mystery of a famous painter who stops speaking after shooting her husband.

SOLD ON A MONDAY by Kristina McMorris

A staged photograph launches the career of a struggling journalist and devastates a family during the Great Depression.

SUMMER OF ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand:

The Levin family undergoes dramatic events with a son in Vietnam, a daughter in protests and dark secrets hiding beneath the surface.

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ  by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

UNDER CURRENTS by Nora Roberts:

Echoes of a violent childhood reverberate for Zane Bigelow when he starts a new kind of family in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

WINDOW ON THE BAY by Debbie Macomber:

A single mom’s life takes unexpected turns when her two children go off to college.

NON-FICTION:.

AMERICAN CARNAGE by Tim Alberta:

Politico Magazine’s chief political correspondent narrates a decade-long civil war inside the GOP and Donald Trump’s concurrent ascension.

AMERICA’S RELUCTANT PRINCE by Steven M. Gillon:

A historian describes John F. Kennedy Jr. through the lens of their decades-long friendship.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

THE BRITISH ARE COMING by Rick Atkinson:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist begins his Revolution Trilogy with events from 1775 to 1777.

DAPPER DAN: MADE IN HARLEM by Daniel R. Day with Mikael Awake:

A memoir by the creator of 1980s high-end streetwear and owner of an eponymous boutique.

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

HOWARD STERN COMES AGAIN by Howard Stern:

The radio interviewer delves into some of his favorite on-air conversations from the past four decades of his career..

JUSTICE ON TRIAL by Mollie Hemingway and Carrie Severino:

The conservative authors give their take on the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

A civil rights lawyer and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

MAN WHO SOLD AMERICA by Joy-Ann Reid:

The MSNBC host gives her analysis of Donald Trump’s presidency.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates:

The philanthropist shares stories of empowering women to improve society.

THE MUELLER REPORT with related materials by The Washington Post: 

Redacted findings from the special counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential obstruction of justice by the president.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

SECOND MOUNTAIN by David Brooks:

A New York Times Op-Ed columnist espouses having an outward focus to attain a meaningful life.

THEY CALLED US ENEMY by George Takei, Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott:

Illustrated by Harmony Becker A graphic novel of Mr. Takei’s firsthand experiences while imprisoned in a Japanese American internment camp during World War II.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

WHITE FRAGILITY by Robin DiAngelo:

Historical and cultural analyses on what causes defensive moves by white people and how this inhibits cross-racial dialogue.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening July 26, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our lucky seven musical streaming* suggestions for the week.

(Click on the album cover to stream the album.)

Country & Weber (2001) by Marianne Weber (Genre: Vocal, International)

Country & Weber is a country themed album by Danish singer Marianne Weber. Weber sings a variety of country classics in Danish making this album a treat!

Songs on the LP include Geef Me Nog ‘N Laatste Kus (He’ll Have To Go), Sneeuwwitte Vredesuif (On The Wings Of A Dove), Ik Doe Wat Ik Wil (Acky Breaky Heart), Toch Hou Ik Zoveel Van Jou (Always On My Mind) and Mijn Groot Geluk (My Happiness).

Emptier Nest: A Playlist for When Your Daughter Goes to College Playlist (34 Songs):

Songs in the Emptier Nest collection include She’s Gone by Hall & Oates, Father and Daughter by Paul Simon, Daddy Lessons by Beyoncé, Every Man Should Know by Harry Connick Jr., Lullabye by Billy Joel, I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair by Mary Martin and You’ve Got A Friend by Carole King.

M’Boom (1979) by Max Roach (Genre: Jazz, Instrumental)

M’Boom was formed by the great drummer Max Roach and the group consisted entirely of percussionists. However, the album is far from the loud drum battle one might visualize upon hearing that! Instead, the percussionists created an album that is beautifully melodic, as well as rhythmic, by utilizing timbales, marimba, vibes, tympani, xylophone and chimes as well as the obvious instrument – drums.

Songs in the set include Twinkle Toes, Onomatopoeia, January V, The Glorious Monster, Morning/Midday and Kujichaglia.

One Giant Leap Moon Tunes Playlist by Various Artists (80 songs):

We are celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing and the Universe of Stories Summer Reading Theme for 2019 with this cool collection of moon themed songs!

Songs/artists in the collection include Full Moon by Santana, The Moon and the Sky by Sade, Moon Over The Bourbon Street by Robert Brandon, How High the Moon by Teddy Wilson, What’s Next to the Moon by AC/DC, Eclipse by Pink Floyd and By The Light of the Silv’ry Moon by Doris Day.

Session, Natural Irish & Jazz by Carrantuohill Celtic Music Group

Despite the genre of the music on this album, Celtic, The Carrantuohill Celtic Music Group is actually from Poland. And Polish is the language being spoken by the band members on this live LP; and as for the music just shut your eyes and picture yourself in Ireland!

Songs on the LP include Mountain Reel, Welcome to Ireland, Dunmore Lasses, Dolemen, Trombas, Miodowka and Silver Spire.

Slide Guitar Bottles, Knives & Steel Vol. 2 by Various Artists (Genre: Blues):

Slide Guitar Bottles, Knives & Steel Vol. 2 is collection of early blues songs featuring top-notch slide guitar playing.

Songs/artists in the set include Moanin’ the Blues by Allen Shaw, Decatur St. 81 by The Georgia Browns, Where The Sweet Old Oranges Grow by Sam Montgomery, Midnight Weeping Blues by Nellie Florence, Dead Cats On the Line by Tampa Red & Georgia Tom and Hard Time Blues by Buddy Moss

Song Hits of the Early 1930s by Various Artists (Genre: Big Band)

Song Hits of the Early 1930s offers a great selection of popular big band and vocal music from the 1930s. 

Songs/Artists on the album include Do The New York by Victor Arden & Phil Ohman & His Orchestra, It’s Great To Be in Love by Ben Selvin & His Orchestra, I’ll Think of You by Joe Gumin & His Orchestra, Lucille! by Ted Black & His Orchestra, It Don’t Mean A Thing by Duke Ellington & His Orchestra, Let’s Have Another Cup of Coffee by Waring’s Pennsylvanians and Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? by Bing Crosby.

Videos of the Week:

Ik doe wat ik wil by Marianne Weber

Adios Amigo by Marianne Weber

Daughters by John Mayer

I’m Gonna Wash That Man Outta My Hair by Mary Martin

You’ve Got A Friend by Carole King

M’Boom by Max Roach & Friends (M’Boom)

Twinkle Toes by Max Roach & M’Boom

Dancing In The Moonlight by King Harvest

How High The Moon by Teddy Wilson

Midnight Moonlight by Duke Jordan

Moon Over Mexico by Luke Coombs

Irish of Woman by Carrantuohill

Silver Spire by Carrantuohill

Midnight Weeping Blues by Nellie Florence

Moanin’ the Blues by Allen Shaw

Things About Coming My Way by Tampa Red

Brother, Can You Spare A Dime? by Bing Crosby

Doin’ The New York by Victor Arden & Phil Ohman & His Orchestra

Let’s Have Another Cup Of Coffee – Fred Waring & His Pennsylvanians

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

*Freegal is a free streaming music service available for free to library cardholders of all Southern Tier Library System member libraries. STLS member libraries include all the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler, and Allegany counties — including our own Southeast Steuben County Library.

You can download the Freegal music app to your mobile device or access the desktop version of the site by clicking on the following link:

*The Freegal service offers library card holders the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading July 22, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Caught Dead in Philadelphia, Amanda Pepper Mystery Series, Book 1 by Gillian Roberts (Format: eBook):

The debut of Philly Prep English teacher and accidental sleuth, Amanda Pepper, (and of C.K. Mackenzie, homicide detective) won the World Mystery Convention’s “Anthony” for best first mystery.

When the body of a colleague is found dead in Amanda’s living room, she has to clear herself of suspicion—and make sure she isn’t the next victim as well. And all she’s got as a clue to the real killer’s identity is a locket shaped like Winnie-the-Pooh.

Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen by Jose Antonio Vargas (Format: eBook):

THE NATIONAL BESTSELLER

“This riveting, courageous memoir ought to be mandatory reading for every American.” —Michelle Alexander, New York Times bestselling author of The New Jim Crow

“l cried reading this book, realizing more fully what my parents endured.” —Amy Tan, New York Times bestselling author of The Joy Luck Club and Where the Past Begins

“This book couldn’t be more timely and more necessary.” —Dave Eggers, New York Times bestselling author of What Is the What and The Monk of Mokha

Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms.

“This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditional sense, but in the unsettled, unmoored psychological state that undocumented immigrants like myself find ourselves in. This book is about lying and being forced to lie to get by; about passing as an American and as a contributing citizen; about families, keeping them together, and having to make new ones when you can’t. This book is about constantly hiding from the government and, in the process, hiding from ourselves. This book is about what it means to not have a home.

After 25 years of living illegally in a country that does not consider me one of its own, this book is the closest thing I have to freedom.”—Jose Antonio Vargas, from Dear America

Lady in the Lake: A Novel written by Laura Lippman and read by Susan Bennett (Format: eBook):

The revered New York Times bestselling author returns with a novel set in 1960s Baltimore that combines modern psychological insights with elements of classic noir, about a middle-aged housewife turned aspiring reporter who pursues the murder of a forgotten young woman.

In 1966, Baltimore is a city of secrets that everyone seems to know—everyone, that is, except Madeline “Maddie” Schwartz. Last year, she was a happy, even pampered housewife. This year, she’s bolted from her marriage of almost twenty years, determined to make good on her youthful ambitions to live a passionate, meaningful life.

Maddie wants to matter, to leave her mark on a swiftly changing world. Drawing on her own secrets, she helps Baltimore police find a murdered girl—assistance that leads to a job at the city’s afternoon newspaper, the Star. Working at the newspaper offers Maddie the opportunity to make her name, and she has found just the story to do it: a missing woman whose body was discovered in the fountain of a city park lake.

Cleo Sherwood was a young African-American woman who liked to have a good time. No one seems to know or care why she was killed except Maddie—and the dead woman herself. Maddie’s going to find the truth about Cleo’s life and death. Cleo’s ghost, privy to Maddie’s poking and prying, wants to be left alone.

Maddie’s investigation brings her into contact with people that used to be on the periphery of her life—a jewelery store clerk, a waitress, a rising star on the Baltimore Orioles, a patrol cop, a hardened female reporter, a lonely man in a movie theater. But for all her ambition and drive, Maddie often fails to see the people right in front of her. Her inability to look beyond her own needs will lead to tragedy and turmoil for all sorts of people—including the man who shares her bed, a black police officer who cares for Maddie more than she knows.

Rebel of the Sands, Rebel of the Sands Series, Book 1 by Alwyn Hamilton (Format: eBooks):

The New York Times bestselling novel by the Goodreads Choice Awards Best Debut Author of 2016, published in 15 countries!

Mortals rule the desert nation of Miraji, but mythical beasts still roam the wild and remote areas, and rumor has it that somewhere, djinn still perform their magic. For humans, it’s an unforgiving place, especially if you’re poor, orphaned, or female. Amani Al’Hiza is all three. She’s a gifted gunslinger with perfect aim, but she can’t shoot her way out of Dustwalk, the back-country town where she’s destined to wind up wed or dead.
Then she meets Jin, a rakish foreigner, in a shooting contest, and sees him as the perfect escape route. But though she’s spent years dreaming of leaving Dustwalk, she never imagined she’d gallop away on mythical horse—or that it would take a foreign fugitive to show her the heart of the desert she thought she knew.

This startlingly original Middle-East-meets-Wild-West fantasy reveals what happens when a dream deferred explodes—in the fires of rebellion, of romantic passion, and the all-consuming inferno of a girl finally embracing her power.

Sarum: The Novel of England written by Edward Rutherfurd and read by Wanda McCaddon (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

In Sarum, Edward Rutherfurd weaves a compelling saga of five English families whose fates become intertwined over the course of centuries. While each family has its own distinct characteristics, the successive generations reflect the changing character of Britain. We become drawn not only into the fortunes of the individual family members, but also the larger destinies of each family line.

Meticulously researched and epic in scope, Sarum covers the entire sweep of English civilization: from the early hunters and farmers, the creation of Stonehenge, the dawn of Christianity, and the Black Death; through the Reformation, the wars in America, the Industrial Age, and the Victorian social reforms; up through the World War II invasion of Normandy and the modern-day concerns of a once-preeminent empire.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

Beirut Hellfire Society: A Novel by Rawi Hage

A searing and visionary novel set in war-torn 1970s Beirut, from an author praised for his “fierce poetic originality” (Boston Globe) and “uncompromising vision” (Colm Tóibín).

On a ravaged street overlooking a cemetery in Beirut’s Christian enclave, we meet an eccentric young man named Pavlov, the son of a local undertaker. When his father meets a sudden and untimely death, Pavlov is approached by a colorful member of the mysterious Hellfire Society―an anti-religious sect that, among many rebellious and often salacious activities, arranges secret burial for outcasts who have been denied last rites because of their religion or sexuality.

Pavlov agrees to take on his father’s work for the society, and over the course of the novel he becomes a survivor-chronicler of his embattled and fading community at the heart of Lebanon’s civil war. His new role introduces him to an unconventional cast of characters, including a father searching for his son’s body, a mysterious woman who takes up residence on Pavlov’s stairs after a bombing, and the flamboyant head of the Hellfire Society, El-Marquis.

Deftly combining comedy with tragedy, gritty reality with surreal absurdity, Beirut Hellfire Society asks: What, after all, can be preserved in the face of certain change and imminent death? The answer is at once propulsive, elegiac, outrageous, profane, and transcendent―and a profoundly moving fable on what it means to live through war.

Copperhead by Alexi Zentner:

“One of the bravest, most bracing novels I’ve read in years.” –Ben Fountain, author of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

Jessup’s stepfather gave him almost everything good in his life–a sober mother, a sister, a sense of home, and the game of football. But during the years that David John spent in prison for his part in a brutal hate crime, Jessup came to realize that his stepfather is also a source of lethal poison for his family. Now it’s Jessup’s senior year, and all he wants to do is lay low until he can accept one of the football scholarships that will be his ticket out of town.

So when his stepfather is released from prison, Jessup is faced with an impossible choice: condemn the man who saved his family or accept his part in his family’s legacy of bigotry. Before he can choose a side, Jessup will cause a terrible accident and cover it up–a mistake with the power to ruin them all.

Told with relentless honesty and a ferocious gaze directed at contemporary America’s darkest corners, Copperhead vibrates with the energy released by football tackles and car crashes and asks uncomfortable questions about the price we pay–and the mistakes we’ll repeat–when we live under the weight of a history we’ve yet to reckon with. Alexi Zentner unspools the story of boys who think they’re men and of the entrenched thinking behind a split-second decision, and asks whether hatred, prejudice, and violence can ever be unlearned.

A Prayer for Travelers by Ruchika Tomar:

“Sometimes characters come along that demand a new kind of novel. The young women at the center of Ruchika Tomar’s A Prayer for Travelers – elusive Penny and wounded Cale – are two spirits hitchhiking through geographies of dislocation and desire. The human collisions in Tomar’s novel are emotionally seismic, and they leave us haunted and unsettled.”–Adam Johnson, author of The Orphan Master’s Son

Cale Lambert, a bookish loner of mysterious parentage, lives in a dusty town near the California-Nevada border, a place where coyotes scavenge for backyard dogs and long-haul truckers scavenge for pills and girls. Cale was raised by her grandfather in a loving, if codependent, household, but as soon as she’s left high school his health begins an agonizing decline. Set adrift for the first time, Cale starts waitressing at the local diner, where she reconnects with Penélope Reyes, a charismatic former classmate running mysterious side-hustles to fund her dreams. Penny exposes Cale to the reality that exists beyond their small town, and the girls become inseparable—-until one terrifying act of violence shatters their world. When Penny vanishes without a trace, Cale must set off on a dangerous quest across the desert to find her friend, and discover herself.

An audacious debut, told in deftly interwoven chapters, A Prayer for Travelers explores the complicated legacy of the American West and the trauma of female experience.

Theme Music by T. Marie Vandelly:

Dixie Wheeler, the narrator of Vandelly’s chilling, enthralling debut, was the sole survivor of a massacre in which her father, Bill, took an ax and, just before breakfast one Thanksgiving, killed his wife and their three sons—ages 15, eight, and four—before slitting his own throat. Only 18-month-old Dixie was left unharmed in their Franconia, Va., home. The press nicknamed her “Baby Blue” because that Badfinger song was playing when the police arrived. When the Wheeler house comes on the market 25 years later, listed as a “stigmatized property,” Dixie impulsively buys it, despite vehement objections from her boyfriend and the aunt who raised her. Dixie furnishes it with the family’s furniture that was stored in the garage of her late uncle, who was adamant that Bill was innocent. The suspense rises as Dixie hears noises, finds items moved or missing, hallucinates about her dead family, and taps into her own dark side. Driven by a believable plot and populated with realistic characters, this delicious mix of horror, ghost story, and mystery marks Vandelly as a writer to watch. –-Publishers Weekly Review

This is How You Lose The Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone:

Two time-traveling agents from warring futures, working their way through the past, begin to exchange letters—and fall in love in this thrilling and romantic book from award-winning authors Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone.

Among the ashes of a dying world, an agent of the Commandant finds a letter. It reads: Burn before reading.

Thus begins an unlikely correspondence between two rival agents hellbent on securing the best possible future for their warring factions. Now, what began as a taunt, a battlefield boast, grows into something more. Something epic. Something romantic. Something that could change the past and the future.

Except the discovery of their bond would mean death for each of them. There’s still a war going on, after all. And someone has to win that war. That’s how war works. Right?

Cowritten by two beloved and award-winning sci-fi writers, This Is How You Lose the Time War is an epic love story spanning time and space.

The Trouble with Gravity by Richard Panek

“A thoughtful meditation on the mythic, cultural, philosophical and, yes, scientific implications of what happens when a wet potato or a crystal vase slips from your hand.”—Billy Collins

A mind-bending exploration of gravity, the universe’s greatest mystery.

What is gravity? Nobody knows—and just about nobody knows that nobody knows. How something so pervasive can also be so mysterious, and how that mystery can be so wholly unrecognized outside the field of physics, is one of the greatest conundrums in modern science. But as award-winning author Richard Panek shows in this groundbreaking book, gravity is a cold case that we are closer to cracking than ever—and whose very investigation has yielded untold truths about the cosmos and humanity itself.

Part scientific detective story, part meta­physical romp, The Trouble with Gravity is a revelation: the first in-depth, accessible study of this ubiquitous, elusive force. Gravity and our efforts to understand it, Panek reveals, have shaped not only the world we inhabit, but also our bodies, minds, and culture. Its influence can be seen in everything from ancient fables to modern furniture, Dante’s Inferno to the pratfalls of Laurel and Hardy, bipedalism to black holes. As we approach the truth about gravity, we should also be prepared to know both our universe and our­selves as never before.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial-free music each day:

RBDigital

*Magazines are available for free and on demand! You can check out magazines and read them on your computer or download the RBDigital app from your app store and read them on your mobile devices.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or RB Digital app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers July 28, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that ends July 28, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

BACKLASH by Brad Thor:

Cut off from any support, Scot Harvath fights to get his revenge.

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

CITY OF GIRLS by Elizabeth Gilbert:

An 89-year-old Vivian Morris looks back at the direction her life took when she entered the 1940s New York theater scene.

COTTAGE BY THE SEA by Debbie Macomber:

Annie Marlow forms new relationships in the Pacific Northwest as she tries to recover from tragedy.

EVVIE DRAKE STARTS OVER by Linda Holmes:

In a seaside town in Maine, a former Major League pitcher and a grieving widow assess their pasts.

KNIFE by Jo Nesbo:

After Rakel kicks him out, Harry Hole begins anew with the Oslo police cold case office to investigate a serial rapist and killer from his past.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

LOST AND FOUND by Danielle Steel:

A photographer embarks on a road trip to reconnect with three men she might have married.

MRS. EVERYTHING by Jennifer Weiner: 

The story of two sisters, Jo and Bethie Kaufman, and their life experiences as the world around them changes drastically from the 1950s.

ON EARTH WE’RE BRIEFLY GORGEOUS by Ocean Vuong:

Little Dog writes a letter to a mother who cannot read, revealing a family history.

THE OVERSTORY by Richard Powers:

Winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Nine people drawn to trees for different reasons fight for the last of the remaining acres of virgin forest.

THE RECKONING by John Grisham:

A decorated World War II veteran shoots and kills a pastor inside a Mississippi church.

SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides:

Theo Faber looks into the mystery of a famous painter who stops speaking after shooting her husband.

SUMMER OF ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand:

The Levin family undergoes dramatic events with a son in Vietnam, a daughter in protests and dark secrets hiding beneath the surface.

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ  by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

UNDER CURRENTS by Nora Roberts:

Echoes of a violent childhood reverberate for Zane Bigelow when he starts a new kind of family in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains.

UNSOLVED by James Patterson and David Ellis:

A string of seemingly accidental and unrelated deaths confound F.B.I. agent Emmy Dockery.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

WHISPER NETWORK by Chandler Baker:

Three close co-workers file a sexual harassment lawsuit against a top C.E.O. candidate at an athletic apparel brand in Dallas.

NON-FICTION:.

ALONE AT DAWN by Dan Schilling and Lori Chapman Longfritz:

An account of the actions taken by Air Force Combat Controller John Chapman in Afghanistan that earned him a posthumous Medal of Honor.

AMERICA’S RELUCTANT PRINCE by Steven M. Gillon:

A historian describes John F. Kennedy Jr. through the lens of their decades-long friendship.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

THE BRITISH ARE COMING by Rick Atkinson:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist begins his Revolution Trilogy with events from 1775 to 1777.

DAPPER DAN: MADE IN HARLEM by Daniel R. Day with Mikael Awake:

A memoir by the creator of 1980s high-end streetwear and owner of an eponymous boutique.

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

FILTHY RICH by James Patterson and John Connolly with Tim Malloy:

The story of a South Florida financier convicted of soliciting sex from underage girls.

HOWARD STERN COMES AGAIN by Howard Stern:

The radio interviewer delves into some of his favorite on-air conversations from the past four decades of his career..

JUSTICE ON TRIAL by Mollie Hemingway and Carrie Severino:

The conservative authors give their take on the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

MAN WHO SOLD AMERICA by Joy-Ann Reid:

The MSNBC host gives her analysis of Donald Trump’s presidency.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE MUELLER REPORT with related materials by The Washington Post: 

Redacted findings from the special counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential obstruction of justice by the president.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

SECOND MOUNTAIN by David Brooks:

A New York Times Op-Ed columnist espouses having an outward focus to attain a meaningful life.

SONGS OF AMERICA by Jon Meacham and Tim McGraw:

Pulitzer Prize winner Jon Meacham and Grammy Award winner Tim McGraw explore how America was shaped by music.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

WHITE FRAGILITY by Robin DiAngelo:

Historical and cultural analyses on what causes defensive moves by white people and how this inhibits cross-racial dialogue.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening July 19, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our lucky seven musical streaming* suggestions for the week.

(Click on the album cover to stream the album.)

Alfred Hitchcock presents Ghost Stories for Young People (Genre: Audiobook):

The title says this collection is just for kids; however, although kids will certainly enjoy this collection – it has a great nostalgic quality to it for those of us who grew up watching Alfred Hitchcock’s TV shows and movies!

Here is a description of this cool album: The master of suspense gets delightfully campy on his 1962 Golden Records LP Ghost Stories for Young People. He ushers in the chills for the children as he narrates The Haunted and the Hunted; The Helpful Hitchhiker; The Magician, and more. Side two, as it were, of this twofer is a creepy-cool 1963 LP on which Dead End Kid Gabriel Dell delivers Frankenstein s Monster Speaks and Dracula’s Return, complete with sound effects!

Stories in the collection include:
1. GHOST STORIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE – How To Listen To Ghost Stories
2. The Haunted And The Hunted (The Pirate s Curse)
3. Plumbing Problem
4. The Magician ( Til Death Do Us Part)
5. Rising Tide
6. Johnny Takes A Dare (The More The Merrier)
7. Marvelous Floating Chair
8. The Open Window By Saki (Special Adaptation)
9. Paddling To The Kitchen
10. The Helpful Hitchhiker
11. Sitting On The Refrigerator
12. Jimmy Takes Vanishing Lessons
13. A Few Final Words Before Sinking

Safe as Milk (1967) by Captain Beefheart & the Magic Band (Genre: Rock, Art-Rock):

Captain Beefheart’s first album was less aggressively eccentric then the later work that made him a polarizing cult hero, but there are enough odd angles and melodic detours in tunes like “Electricity” and “Grown So Ugly” to remind anyone who this is. 1967’s Safe As Milk is full of great buzzy guitar (some courtesy Ry Cooder) and some of Beefheart’s most potent blues shouting, and “I’m Glad” is as close to sincere blue-eyed soul as he would ever get. – Mark Deming, AllMusic/Tumblr review

Songs on the LP include Sure ‘Nuff ‘n’ Yes, I Do, Zig Zag Wanderer, Droput Boggie, I’m Glad and Electricity.

The Book of Taliesyn (1968) by Deep Purple (Genre: Classic Rock, Progressive Rock):

The Book of Taliesyn is the second album by the progressive rock band Deep Purple.

This early version of Deep Purple featured Rod Evans on vocals, Nick Simper on bass with the mainstay trio of guitarist Ritchie Blackmore, keyboardist Jon Lord on and drummer Ian Paice.

This is a terrific album showcasing how rock music began to grow and expand as a musical art form in the late sixties.

Songs on the album include Listen, Learn, Read On, Exposition/We Can Work It Out, Anthem, River Deep, Mountain High and It’s All Over.

Universal Men (1979) by Johnny Clegg & Juluka (Genre: International, Folk, Pop):

Universal Men, Juluka’s 1979 debut album (belatedly released in the U.S. in 1992), was a remarkable document for its time. Johnny Clegg and Sipho Mchunu achieved a canny mixture of Western folk-rock and Zulu chant, creating a pop hybrid like nothing that had been heard before, even if the flute and sax solos of Robbie Jansen, playing against the acoustic guitars and Clegg’s reedy voice, sometimes suggested Jethro Tull. And Clegg, Mchunu, and company were just as ambitious lyrically, constructing a concept record about the life of a South African migrant worker who played into the band’s social consciousness and pan-African nationalism, notably in the song “Africa,” which became one of their signature tunes. In retrospect, Universal Men is not as impressive as later Juluka albums that expanded upon its basic formula, but it retains historical importance as a major document in African popular music and thus an influence on world popular music, leading to the development of mbaqanga. And those Zulu choruses are catchy, too. – William Ruhlmann, AllMusic Review

Songs on the LP include Sky People, Universal Man, Deliwe, Africa, Uthando Luphelile and Old Eyes.

Do You Believe in Heather? (2019) composed by Ståle Kleiberg and performed by Various Artists (Genre: Classical):

Composer Ståle Kleiberg is quite popular in Norway and is beginning to gain appreciation abroad for scores that fall into an easy modal framework, but have a complex inwardness that marks them as part of the contemporary era. He is sometimes classed as neo-Romantic, but somehow his music, languid and lyrical as it may be, has a psychological dimension that makes the label seem unsuitable. A characteristic work here is the Trio Luna (sample “Luna serale”), for the Debussyan ensemble of flute, viola, and harp. Like Debussy, Kleiberg succeeds in divorcing the harp totally from its salon connotations; it imbues the work with the shades of moonlight the music represents. The opening String Quartet No. 3, although more abstract, is similar in mood. There are two song cycles, both set to works by poet Helge Torvund, who has had an ongoing creative relationship with Kleiberg. The album title is from one of them: Trur du på lyng? (Do You Believe in Heather?). As the title suggests, the poems are not only naturalistic but involve, in a quintessentially Scandinavian way, inner reactions to nature. The low-key, low-vibrato singing of soprano Marianne Beate Kielland captures the meditative quality of the texts beautifully. A notable feature of the album is that it is an ensemble creation; although Kielland appears on more than half of the music on the album, no specific artist is billed. Highly recommended for lovers of contemporary chamber music.- James Manheim, AllMusic Review.

The Original Jazz (1961) by Kid Ory & His Orchestra (Genre: Jazz, Dixieland, Creole, Tailgate):

Kid Ory (1886-1973) was a New Orleans based trombonist and a member of the first generation of Jazz musicians. He first achieved success playing with his band in the teens of the 20th Century. He took a hiatus from music and raised chickens during the Great Depression and then returned to playing music professionally in the 1940s and continued to play professionally through subsequent decades. He eventually retired to Hawaii where he died in 1973 at age 86.

This is a fun brassy album featuring the songs Sweet Lorraine, Down by the Riverside, Baby Face, Dinah and the World is Waiting for the Sunrise.

Act Surprised (2019) by Sebadoh (Genre: Rock, Hard Rock):

Act Surprised is the brand new album from the indie rock band Sebadoh.

And you like hard rock and are taking a road trip this summer, this is a fun album to play with the volume turned up as you’re rolling down the highway!

Songs in the set include Phantom, Celebrate The Void, Follow the Breath, See-Saw and Vacation.

Videos of the Week:

The Jar from The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

Electricity by Captain Beefheart And His Magic Band (Cannes Live 1968):

Sure ’nuff ‘n Yes I Do by Captain Beefheart & Magic Band (Midem Festival Cannes, France 1-27-68):

Listen, Learn, Read On by Deep Purple

Africa by Johnny Clegg & Juluka

Universal Men by Johnny Clegg & Juluka

Trur du på lyng?: I. Fruktbar stille (Do You Believe in Heather?) composed by Stale Kielland and performed by Marianne Beate Kielland & Ole Christian Haggenrud

Trio Luna: I. Luna serale composed by Ståle Kleiberg and performed by Annika Nordstrøm, Jan Petter Hilstad & Ruth Potter

Tin Roof Blues by Kid Ory’s Creole Jazz Band

Royal Garden Blues by Kid Ory’s Creole Jazz Band

Follow The Breath by Sebadoh

Phantom by Sebadoh

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Kid Ory, 86, Dead; Jazz Trombonist. The New York Times. January 24, 1973. Accessed online, July 17,2019, https://www.nytimes.com/1973/01/24/archives/kid-ory-86-dead-jazz-trombonist-exponent-of-dixieland-slide-wrote.html

*Freegal is a free streaming music service available for free to library cardholders of all Southern Tier Library System member libraries. STLS member libraries include all the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler, and Allegany counties — including our own Southeast Steuben County Library.

You can download the Freegal music app to your mobile device or access the desktop version of the site by clicking on the following link:

*The Freegal service offers library card holders the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading July 15, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs (Format: eBook):

#1 New York Times bestselling author Susan Wiggs brings readers into the lush abundance of Sonoma County, in a story of sisters, friendship and the invisible bonds of history that are woven like a spell around us.

Tess Delaney loves illuminating history; returning stolen treasures to their rightful owners and filling the spaces in people’s hearts with stories of their family legacies. But Tess’s own history is filled with gaps: a father she never met, and a mother who spent more time traveling than with her daughter.

Then the enigmatic Dominic Rossi arrives on her San Francisco doorstep with the news that the grandfather she’s never met is in a coma and that she’s destined to inherit half of a hundred-acre apple orchard estate called Bella Vista. The rest is willed to Isabel Johansen, the half sister she never knew she had. Isabel is everything Tess isn’t, but against the rich landscape of Bella Vista, with Isabel and Dominic by her side, Tess begins to discover a world where family comes first and the roots of history run deep.

Crashing the A-List by Summer Heacock (Format: eBook):

She’s doing all the wrong things for all the right reasons.

After four months of unemployment, former book editor Clara Montgomery is officially stuck—stuck sleeping on her little brother’s ugly couch in Queens, stuck scrolling through job listings in search of a new editorial position…and just desperate enough to take on a temporary gig clearing out abandoned storage units. If nothing else, she’s determined to keep her rapidly dwindling savings account intact.

Unfortunately, she is in no way prepared for stumbling upon dead snakes or dealing with glass jars that she’s convinced are full of pickled eyeballs. And why does everything seem to smell like beets?

Then Clara comes across a unit that was once owned by an escort service and finds the brothel “résumé” of a younger Caspian Tiddleswich, an astonishingly famous British actor. She has no intention of cashing in on her discovery, but her awkward attempts to reassure Caspian that his secret is safe go awry. Now Caspian is convinced that Clara is a blackmailer, the tabloids have her pegged as Caspian’s newest girlfriend…and Clara begins to find the A-lister’s charms more irresistible than she expected.

Growing Things by Paul Tremblay (Format: eBook):

A Nearly Normal Family: A Novel written by M.T. Edvardsson & read by Emily Watson (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

New York Times Book Review recommends M.T. Edvardsson’s A Nearly Normal Family and lauds it as a “page-turner” that forces the reader to confront “the compromises we make with ourselves to be the people we believe our beloveds expect.” (NYTimes Book Review Summer Reading Issue)

M.T. Edvardsson’s A Nearly Normal Family is a gripping legal thriller that forces the listener to consider: How far would you go to protect the ones you love? In this twisted narrative of love and murder, a horrific crime makes a seemingly normal family question everything they thought they knew about their life—and one another.

Eighteen-year-old Stella Sandell stands accused of the brutal murder of a man almost fifteen years her senior. She is an ordinary teenager from an upstanding local family. What reason could she have to know a shady businessman, let alone to kill him?

Stella’s father, a pastor, and mother, a criminal defense attorney, find their moral compasses tested as they defend their daughter, while struggling to understand why she is a suspect. Told in an unusual three-part structure, A Nearly Normal Family asks the questions: How well do you know your own children? How far would you go to protect them?

To Live and Die in Dixie written by Mary Kay Andrews & read by Hillary Huber (Format: Downloadable Audiobook)

Callahan Garrity is the owner of house mouse, a cleaning service that tidies up after Atlanta’s elite. She’s also a former cop and a part-time sleuth. She and her coterie of devoted helpers can ransack a house for clues faster than it takes a fingerprint to set.

From her time on the Atlanta police force, Callahan has excelled at mopping up messes of all kinds. But she has no idea what she’s getting into when she agrees to work for infamous antiques dealer Elliot Littlefield.

The first day on the job, she and her crew are on the trail of a stolen Civil War diary. Soon they are tangling with deadly serious collectors, right-wing radicals, and impulsive teenagers, all of which make the case even more difficult to solve.

Under Currents by Nora Roberts (Format: Downloadable Audiobook)

For both Zane and Darby, their small town roots hold a terrible secret. Now, decades later, they’ve come together to build a new life. But will the past set them free or pull them under?

Zane Bigelow grew up in a beautiful, perfectly kept house in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Strangers and even Zane’s own aunt across the lake see his parents as a successful surgeon and his stylish wife, making appearances at their children’s ballet recitals and baseball games. Only Zane and his sister know the truth, until one brutal night finally reveals cracks in the facade, and Zane escapes for college without a thought of looking back…

Years later, Zane returns to his hometown determined to reconnect with the place and people that mean so much to him, despite the painful memories. As he resumes life in the colorful town, he meets a gifted landscape artist named Darby, who is on the run from ghosts of her own.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

PRINT:

After The End by Clare Mackintosh:

Max and Pip are the strongest couple you know. They’re best friends, lovers — unshakable. But then their son gets sick and the doctors put the question of his survival into their hands. For the first time, Max and Pip can’t agree. They each want a different future for their son. What if they could have both? A gripping and propulsive exploration of love, marriage, parenthood, and the road not taken, After the End brings one unforgettable family from unimaginable loss to a surprising, satisfying, and redemptive ending and the life they are fated to find. With the emotional power of Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper, Mackintosh helps us to see that sometimes the end is just another beginning.

The Darwin Affair: A Novel by Timothy Mason:

Get ready for one of the most inventive and entertaining novels of 2019—an edge-of-your-seat Victorian-era thriller, where the controversial publication On the Origin of Species sets off a string of unspeakable crimes.

London, June 1860: When an assassination attempt is made on Queen Victoria, and a petty thief is gruesomely murdered moments later—and only a block away—Chief Detective Inspector Charles Field quickly surmises that these crimes are connected to an even more sinister plot. Was Victoria really the assassin’s target? Are those closest to the Crown hiding something? And who is the shadowy figure witnesses describe as having lifeless, coal-black eyes?

Soon, Field’s investigation exposes a shocking conspiracy in which the publication of Charles Darwin’s controversial On the Origin of Species sets off a string of murders, arson, kidnapping, and the pursuit of a madman named the Chorister. As the investigation takes Field from the dangerous alleyways of London to the hallowed halls of Oxford, the list of possible conspirators grows, and the body count escalates. And as he edges closer to the Chorister, he uncovers dark secrets that were meant to remain forever hidden.

Tim Mason has created a rousing page-turner that both Charles Dickens and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would relish and envy.

Eye Spy by Mercedes Lackey: 

Mags, Herald Spy of Valdemar, and his wife, Amily, the King’s Own Herald, are happily married with three kids. Their daughter, Abidela, dreams of building on her parents’ legacy by joining her father’s network of spies, hoping to offset her seeming lack of a Gift. But when Abi senses the imminent collapse of a bridge only moments before it happens, she saves countless lives, including that of her best friend, Princess Katiana. The experience, though harrowing, uncovers her unique Gift, an ability to sense the physical strains in objects. Intrigued by the potential of her Gift, the Artificers seek to claim her as their own, but only the Healers can train her. Through training with both of them, Abi discovers unique facets of her Gift, including a synesthetic connection to objects that allows her to ‘see’ as well as feel the strains. Her Gift may also grant her a distinct advantage as a spy, there won’t be a building in the entire kingdom of Valdemar with a secret room that she doesn’t know about. With the help of her mentors, she must hone her gift to uncover the hidden secrets in the depths of Valdemar.

The Gone Dead: A Novel by Chanelle Benz:

Billie James’ inheritance isn’t much: a little money and a shack in the Mississippi Delta. The house once belonged to her father, a renowned black poet who died unexpectedly when Billie was four years old. Though Billie was there when the accident happened, she has no memory of that day, and she hasn’t been back to the South since. Thirty years later, Billie returns but her father’s home is unnervingly secluded: her only neighbors are the McGees, the family whose history has been entangled with hers since the days of slavery. As Billie encounters the locals, she hears a strange rumor: that she herself went missing on the day her father died. As the mystery intensifies, she finds out that this forgotten piece of her past could put her in danger.

Oval by Elvia Wilk:

In the near future, Berlin’s real estate is being flipped in the name of “sustainability,” only to make the city even more unaffordable; artists are employed by corporations as consultants, and the weather is acting strange. When Anja and Louis are offered a rent-free home on an artificial mountain—yet another eco-friendly initiative run by a corporation—they seize the opportunity, but it isn’t long before the experimental house begins malfunctioning.

After Louis’s mother dies, Anja is convinced he has changed. At work, Louis has become obsessed with a secret project: a pill called Oval that temporarily rewires the user’s brain to be more generous. While Anja is horrified, Louis believes he has found the solution to Berlin’s income inequality. Oval is a fascinating portrait of the unbalanced relationships that shape our world, as well as a prescient warning of what the future may hold.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial-free music each day:

RBDigital

*Magazines are available for free and on demand! You can check out magazines and read them on your computer or download the RBDigital app from your app store and read them on your mobile devices.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or RB Digital app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.