Suggested Reading September 16, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Akin written by Emma Donoghue and read by Jason Culp (Format: Downloadable Audiobooks):

A retired New York professor’s life is thrown into chaos when he takes a young great-nephew to the French Riviera, in hopes of uncovering his own mother’s wartime secrets

Noah Selvaggio is a retired chemistry professor and widower now living on the Upper West Side but born in the south of France. He is days away from his first visit back to Nice since he was a child, bringing with him a handful of puzzling photos he has discovered from his mother’s wartime years. But he receives a call from social services: Noah is the closest available relative of an eleven-year-old great-nephew he’s never met, who urgently needs someone to look after him. Out of a feeling of obligation, Noah agrees to take Michael along on his trip.

Much has changed in this famously charming seaside mecca, still haunted by memories of the Nazi occupation. The unlikely duo, suffering from jet lag and culture shock, bicker about everything from steak-frites to screen time. But Noah gradually comes to appreciate the boy’s truculent wit, and Michael’s ease with tech and sharp eye help Noah unearth troubling details about their family’s past. Both come to grasp the risks people in all eras have run for their loved ones, and find they are more akin than they knew.

Written with all the tenderness and psychological intensity that made Room an international bestseller, Akin is a funny, heart-wrenching tale of an old man and a boy, born two generations apart, who unpick their painful story and start to write a new one together.

The Beekeeper of Aleppo: A Novel written by Christy Lefteri & read by Art Malik (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

This unforgettable novel puts human faces on the Syrian war with the immigrant story of a beekeeper, his wife, and the triumph of spirit when the world becomes unrecognizable.

“Courageous and provocative, The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a beautifully crafted novel of international significance that has the capacity to have us open our eyes and see.”—Heather Morris, author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Nuri is a beekeeper and Afra, his wife, is an artist. Mornings, Nuri rises early to hear the call to prayer before driving to his hives in the countryside. On weekends, Afra sells her colorful landscape paintings at the open-air market. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the hills of the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo—until the unthinkable happens. When all they love is destroyed by war, Nuri knows they have no choice except to leave their home. But escaping Syria will be no easy task: Afra has lost her sight, leaving Nuri to navigate her grief as well as a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece toward an uncertain future in Britain.

Nuri is sustained only by the knowledge that waiting for them is his cousin Mustafa, who has started an apiary in Yorkshire and is teaching fellow refugees the art of beekeeping. As Nuri and Afra travel through a broken world, they must confront not only the pain of their own unspeakable loss but dangers that would overwhelm even the bravest souls. Above all, they must make the difficult journey back to each other, a path once so familiar yet rendered foreign by the heartache of displacement.

Moving, intimate, and beautifully written, The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a book for our times: a novel that at once reminds us that the most peaceful and ordinary lives can be utterly upended in unimaginable ways and brings a journey in faraway lands close to home, never to be forgotten.

Advance praise for The Beekeeper of Aleppo

“This book dips below the deafening headlines, and tells a true story with subtlety and power.”—Esther Freud, author of Mr. Mac and Me

“This compelling tale had me gripped with its compassion, its sensual style, and its onward and lively urge for resolution.”—Daljit Nagra, author of British Museum

“This novel speaks to so much that is happening in the world today. It’s intelligent, thoughtful, and relevant, but very importantly it is accessible. I’m recommending this book to everyone I care about.”—Benjamin Zephaniah, author of Refugee Boy

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead: A Novel written by Olga Tokarczuk & read by Antonia Lloyd-Jones (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

FINALIST FOR THE 2019 MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE

“A brilliant literary murder mystery.” -Chicago Tribune

“Extraordinary. Tokarczuk’s novel is funny, vivid, dangerous, and disturbing, and it raises some fierce questions about human behavior. My sincere admiration for her brilliant work.” -Annie Proulx

In a remote Polish village, Janina devotes the dark winter days to studying astrology, translating the poetry of William Blake, and taking care of the summer homes of wealthy Warsaw residents. Her reputation as a crank and a recluse is amplified by her not-so-secret preference for the company of animals over humans. Then a neighbor, Big Foot, turns up dead. Soon other bodies are discovered, in increasingly strange circumstances. As suspicions mount, Janina inserts herself into the investigation, certain that she knows whodunit. If only anyone would pay her mind . . .

A deeply satisfying thriller cum fairy tale, Drive Your Plow over the Bones of the Dead is a provocative exploration of the murky borderland between sanity and madness, justice and tradition, autonomy and fate. Whom do we deem sane? it asks. Who is worthy of a voice?

Fated by written by Benedict Jacka and read by Gildart Jackson (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

Alex Verus is part of a world hidden in plain sight, running a magic shop in London. And while Alex’s own powers aren’t as showy as some mages, he does have the advantage of foreseeing the possible future-allowing him to pull off operations that have a million-to-one-chance of success. But when Alex is approached by multiple factions to crack open a relic from a long-ago mage war, he knows that whatever’s inside must be beyond powerful. And thanks to his abilities, Alex can predict that by taking the job, his odds of survival are about to go from slim to none . . .

If you like Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files series, check out Fated!

Into the Planet: My Life as a Cave Diver written & read by Jill Heinerth (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

From one of the world’s most renowned cave divers, a firsthand account of exploring the earth’s final frontier: the hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planet

More people have died exploring underwater caves than climbing Mount Everest, and we know more about deep space than we do about the depths of our oceans. From one of the top cave divers working today—and one of the very few women in her field—Into the Planet blends science, adventure, and memoir to bring readers face-to-face with the terror and beauty of earth’s remaining unknowns and the extremes of human capability.

Jill Heinerth—the first person in history to dive deep into an Antarctic iceberg and leader of a team that discovered the ancient watery remains of Mayan civilizations—has descended farther into the inner depths of our planet than any other woman. She takes us into the harrowing split-second decisions that determine whether a diver makes it back to safety, the prejudices that prevent women from pursuing careers underwater, and her endeavor to recover a fallen friend’s body from the confines of a cave. But there’s beauty beyond the danger of diving, and while Heinerth swims beneath our feet in the lifeblood of our planet, she works with biologists discovering new species, physicists tracking climate change, and hydrogeologists examining our finite freshwater reserves.

Written with hair-raising intensity, Into the Planet, is the first book to deliver an intimate account of cave diving, transporting readers deep into inner space, where fear must be reconciled and a mission’s success balances between knowing one’s limits and pushing the envelope of human endurance.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

Darkness to Light: A Memoir by Lamar Odom:

Fame. Sex. Pain. Drugs. Death. Booze. Money. Addiction. Redemption. Dizzying heights. Rock-bottom depths. Desperation and elation–sometimes in the same hour. Not to mention power . . . and the struggle for it. The world knows Lamar Odom as a two-time NBA world champion who rocketed to uncharted heights of fame thanks to being a member of both the storied Los Angeles Lakers and the ubiquitous Kardashian empire. In Darkness to Light, Lamar gives readers an intimate look into his life like never before. His exclusive and revealing memoir recounts the highs and lows of fame and his struggle with his demons along the way to self-discovery and redemption. From the pain of his unraveled marriage to Khloé Kardashian to the harmful vices he used to cope–and the near-death experience that made him rethink everything about his life–this is Lamar as you have never before seen him. Lamar brings basketball fans directly into the action of a game during the Lakers championship years. He shares his personal account of the lifelong passion that started as one shining light in a childhood marked by loss and led to his international fame as one of the most extraordinary athletes of all time. In this profoundly honest book, Lamar invites you to walk with him through the good times and bad, while looking ahead to a brighter future.

Land of Wolves by Craig Johnson:

The new novel in Craig Johnson’s beloved New York Times bestselling Longmire series. Attempting to recover from his harrowing experiences in Mexico, in Land of Wolves Wyoming Sheriff Walt Longmire is neck deep in the investigation of what could or could not be the suicidal hanging of a shepherd. With unsettling connections to a Basque family with a reputation for removing the legs of Absaroka County sheriffs, matters become even more complicated with the appearance of an oversize wolf in the Big Horn Mountains to which Walt finds himself feeling more and more empathetic.

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Lost History of Dreams by Kris Waldherr:

When famed Byronesque poet Hugh de Bonne is discovered dead of a heart attack in his bath one morning, his cousin Robert Highstead, a historian turned post-mortem photographer, is charged with a simple task: transport Hugh’s remains for burial in a chapel. This chapel, a stained glass folly set on the moors of Shropshire, was built by de Bonne sixteen years earlier to house the remains of his beloved wife and muse, Ada. Since then, the chapel has been locked and abandoned, a pilgrimage site for the rabid fans of de Bonne’s last book, The Lost History of Dreams. However, Ada’s grief-stricken niece refuses to open the glass chapel for Robert unless he agrees to her bargain: before he can lay Hugh to rest, Robert must record Isabelle’s story of Ada and Hugh’s ill-fated marriage over the course of five nights. As the mystery of Ada and Hugh’s relationship unfolds, so does the secret behind Robert’s own marriage–including that of his fragile wife, Sida, who has not been the same since the tragic accident three years ago, and the origins of his own morbid profession that has him seeing things he shouldn’t–things from beyond the grave.

A Single Thread by Tracy Chevalier:

1932. After the Great War took both her beloved brother and her fiancé, Violet Speedwell has become a “surplus woman,” one of a generation doomed to a life of spinsterhood after the war killed so many young men. Yet Violet cannot reconcile herself to a life spent caring for her grieving, embittered mother. After countless meals of boiled eggs and dry toast, she saves enough to move out of her mother’s place and into the town of Winchester, home to one of England’s grandest cathedrals. There, Violet is drawn into a society of broderers–women who embroider kneelers for the Cathedral, carrying on a centuries-long tradition of bringing comfort to worshippers. Violet finds support and community in the group, fulfillment in the work they create, and even a growing friendship with the vivacious Gilda. But when forces threaten her new independence and another war appears on the horizon, Violet must fight to put down roots in a place where women aren’t expected to grow.

Teeth in the Mist by Dawn Kurtagich:

A genre-bending epic horror-fantasy, inspired by the legend of Faust, that spans generations as an ancient evil is uncovered—perfect for fans of Kendare Blake and Ransom Riggs.

Before the birth of time, a monk uncovers the Devil’s Tongue and dares to speak it. The repercussions will be felt for generations…

Sixteen-year-old photography enthusiast Zoey has been fascinated by the haunted, burnt-out ruins of Medwyn Mill House for as long as she can remember—so she and her best friend, Poulton, run away from home to explore them. But are they really alone in the house? And who will know if something goes wrong?

In 1851, seventeen-year-old Roan arrives at the Mill House as a ward—one of three, all with something to hide from their new guardian. When Roan learns that she is connected to an ancient secret, she must escape the house before she is trapped forever.

1583. Hermione, a new young bride, accompanies her husband to the wilds of North Wales where he plans to build the largest water mill and mansion in the area. But rumors of unholy rituals lead to a tragic occurrence and she will need all her strength to defeat it.

Three women, centuries apart, drawn together by one Unholy Pact. A pact made by a man who, more than a thousand years later, may still be watching…

This haunting and captivating mystery redefines the horror and fantasy space.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive or the RB Digital app, to check out on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers September 22, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week ending September 8, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

A BETTER MAN by Louise Penny:

The 15th book in the Chief Inspector Gamache series. The search for a missing girl is imperiled by rising floodwaters across the province.

DARK ILLUSION by Christine Feehan:

The 33rd book in the Carpathian series. A mage and an ancient warrior must stop a threat against all Carpathians.

THE DARK SIDE by Danielle Steel:

Painful childhood memories surface for Zoe Morgan when she has a child of her own.

THE GIRL WHO LIVED TWICE by David Lagercrantz:

Mikael Blomkvist helps Lisbeth Salander put her past behind her in the latest installment of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series.

THE GOLDFINCH by Donna Tartt:

After his mother is killed in a museum explosion, a young man grapples with the world alone while hiding a prized Dutch painting.

THE INN by James Patterson and Candice Fox:

A former Boston police detective who is now an innkeeper must shield a seaside town from a crew of criminals.

LONG CALL by Ann Cleeves:

Detective Matthew Venn faces his past in North Devon while he investigates the death of a man with an albatross tattoo.

LOOK ALIVE TWENTY-FIVE by Janet Evanovich:

The 25th book in the Stephanie Plum series. When several managers of a deli in Trenton disappear, a bounty hunter and her detective boyfriend look for clues.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

NOTHING VENTURED by Jeffrey Archer:

While investigating the theft of a Rembrandt painting from the Fitzmolean Museum, the Scotland Yard detective William Warwick falls in love with a research assistant.

OLD BONES by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child:

An expedition into the Sierra Nevada uncovers new twists to the events involving the Donner party.

ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci:

A World War II veteran on parole must find the real killer in a small town or face going back to jail.

THE ORACLE by Jonathan Cahn:

A traveler discovers mysteries hidden behind seven locked doors.

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SECRETS WE KEPT by Lara Prescott:

During the Cold War, members of the C.I.A.’s typing pool aid its mission to smuggle the banned book “Doctor Zhivago” behind the Iron Curtain.

SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides:

Theo Faber looks into the mystery of a famous painter who stops speaking after shooting her husband.

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

THIS TENDER LAND by William Kent Krueger:

Four orphans escape a Minnesota school and encounter a cross-section of different people struggling during the Great Depression.

TURN OF THE KEY by Ruth Ware:

A nanny working in a technology-laden house in Scotland goes to jail when one of the children dies.

VENDETTA IN DEATH by J.D. Robb:

The 49th book of the In Death series. Eve Dallas looks into the misdeeds of a wealthy businessman while a vigilante named Lady Justice uses disguises to avenge women who were wronged.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

NON-FICTION:

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST by Ibram X. Kendi:

A primer for creating a more just and equitable society through identifying and opposing racism.

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

 A civil rights lawyer and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

RADICALS, RESISTANCE AND REVENGE by Jeanine Pirro:

The Fox News host posits those she labels anti-Trump conspirators have committed possible crimes and a plot to destroy liberty.

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

TRICK MIRROR by Jia Tolentino:


Nine essays delving into late capitalism, online engagement and the author’s personal history.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening September 13, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations of the week!

1967: A Complete Rock Music History of the Summer of Love written by Harvey Kubernik (Format: Print Book):

During late spring 1967, tens of thousands of young people began streaming into San Francisco, kicking off a counterculture revolution and cultural explosion that was the Summer of Love. Now, on the 50th anniversary of that revolutionary event, acclaimed journalist and pop culture historian Harvey Kubernik takes us on an insider’s look at the happenings in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and beyond—in the months leading up to, during, and after that seminal summer—through the lens of rock music. This lush volume features a trove of little-known and previously unpublished interviews with scenemakers and musicians of the time and the people who knew them; psychedelic festival posters, concert flyers, and other 1960s ephemera; and stunning images from acclaimed photographers of the era.

“Packed with new interviews with principals like Carlos Santana, Michelle Phillips and Roger McGuinn, [1967] gives month-by-month accounts of the scenes in London, San Francisco, New York, and even Australia, where the Bee Gees were scoring their first hits. The result breathes new life into a wide-open cultural moment.”—Rolling Stone

Some of the many musicians featured in the book include Janis Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, The Jefferson Airplane, The Grateful Dead, The Buffalo Springfield, Otis Redding, The Doors, The Mar-Keys, The Byrds, The Bee Gees and Pink Floyd.

The Big Red Songbook: 250+ IWW Songs Edited by Archie Green, David Roediger, Franklin Rosemont & Salvatore Salerno (Format: Print Book):

In 1905, representatives from dozens of radical labor groups came together in Chicago to form One Big Union—the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), known as the Wobblies. The union was a big presence in the labor movement and everywhere its members went, they sang.

Their songs were sung in mining camps and textile mills, hobo jungles and flophouses, and anywhere workers might be recruited to the Wobbliers’ cause. The songs were published in a pocket-size tome called the Little Red Songbook, which was so successful that it’s been published continuously since 1909.

In The Big Red Songbook, the editors have gathered songs from over three dozen editions, plus additional songs, rare artwork, personal recollections, discographies, and more into one big all-embracing book.

IWW poets/composers strove to nurture revolutionary consciousness. Each piece—whether topical, hortatory, elegiac, or comic—served to educate, agitate, and emancipate workers. A handful of Wobbly numbers have become classics, still sung by labor groups and folks singers. They include Joe Hill’s sardonic he Preacher and the Slave” (sometimes known by hit famous phrase “Pie in the Sky”) and Ralph Chaplin’s “Solidarity Forever.” Songs lost or found, sacred or irreverent, touted or neglected, serious or zany, singable or not, are here. The Wobblies and their friends have been singing for a century. May this comprehensive gathering simultaneous celebrate past battles and chart future goals.”

Some of the 250+ songs chronicled in the book include:

If You Workers Would Only Unit written by Richard Brazier

Scissor Bill by Joe Hill

Stung Right by Joe Hill

Stand Up! Ye Workers by Ethel Comer

The Parasites by John E. Nordquist

Larimer Street by Utah Phillips

Union Maid by Woody Guthrie

Blues For Dracula (1958) by Philly Joe Jones (part of the CD set “Six Classic Albums”):

Drummer Philly Joe Jones’ debut recording as a leader, made shortly after he left Miles Davis’ Quintet, starts out with his amusing but overly long monologue on “Blues for Dracula,” during which he does his best to imitate Bela Lugosi. The remainder of the set (which has been reissued on CD) is more conventional, with fine playing from cornetist Nat Adderley, trombonist Julian Priester, the great tenor Johnny Griffin, pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Jimmy Garrison, and the drummer/leader. Dizzy Gillespie’s “Ow” and Cal Massey’s “Fiesta” are heard in lengthy versions on the worthwhile but not overly essential release. Scott Yanow, AllMusic Review

Song List:

1. Blues for Dracula

2. Trick Street

3. Fiesta

4. Tune-Up

5. Ow!

The other six LPs in this set are:
Drums Around The World (1958)
Philly Joe’s Beat (1960)
Showcase (1959)
Serge Chaloff – Blue Serge (1958)
J.R. Monterose (1958)

Halloween Stomp by Various Artists (Format: Music CD):

I know Halloween seems like it is a long time off, however, it will be here before we know it! And as the library only has a handful of Halloween music CDs for adults – I think now is the time to recommend my favorite Halloween CD – Halloween Stomp!

This disc features 27 big band and jazz songs recorded from the 1920s to 1950.

And here’s the AllMusic Review for more info! This collection of “spooky” performances is dominated by songs dealing with ghosts and monsters, everything from “Mysterious Mose” and “Got the Jitters” to “Zombie,” “Skeleton in the Closet,” “The Ghost of Smokey Joe” and “With Her Head Tucked Underneath Her Arm.” Most of the music is from the swing era with such bands as those led by Red Nichols, Don Redman, Glen Gray, Louis Prima, Ozzie Nelson, Cab Calloway, Tommy Dorsey and even Rudy Vallee alternating with much more obscure groups. The producers at Jass have also “enhanced” the music by inserting odd sound effects between songs. This CD certainly qualifies as the definitive (and also only) Halloween jazz album. –Scott Yanow, AllMusic

If you’re having a Halloween party this year, you’ll enjoy this humorous, swinging collection!

Song List:
1. The Haunted House by Ray Noble & His Orchestra
2. Shivery Stomp by Frankie Trumbauer & His Orchestra
3. Mysterious Mose by Harry Reser & The Radio All-Stars
4. The Boogie Man Is Here by Tom Gerun & His Orchestra
5. Haunting Blues by Red Nichols, Jimmy Dorsey & Eddie Lang
6. Bug-A-Boo by Red Nichols & Wingy Mannone
7. Got The Jitters by Don Redman & His Orchestra
8. The Boogie Man by Todd Rollins & Chuck Bullock
9. The House Is Haunted by Glen Gray & The Casa Loma Orchestra
10. Zombie by Gene Kardos & His Orchestra
11. Mr. Ghost Goes To Town by Louis Prima & Pee Wee Russell
12. Skeleton In The Closet by Nat Gonnella & His Georgians
13. The Goblin Band by Glen Gray & Casa Loma Orchestra
14. Hell’s Bells by Sid Peltyn & His Orchestra
15. With her Head Tucked Under Her Arm by Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees
16. The Black Cat by Ozzie Nelson & His Orchestra
17. Strange Enchantment by Gil Evans
18. The Ghost of Smokey Joe by Cab Calloway & His Orcehstra
19. Ol’ Man Mose Ain’t Dead by The (Nat) King COle Trio
20. Swingin’ At The Seance by Glenn Miller & His Orchestra
“Horror Fantasia For Spooks And Wild Indians” (Tracks 21 – 24) by Charlie Barnet & His Orchestra with Peggy Lee on vocals
21. Fanfare/Cherokee (Theme)
22. Old Man Mose Is Dead
23. Redskin Rhumba
24. Pompton Tunrpike
25. Haunted Heart by Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra
26. The Headless Horseman by Kay Starr
27. Dry Bones by Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra

Moanin’ In The Moonlight (1959) by Howlin’ Wolf:

Moanin’ in the Moonlight was Howlin’ Wolf’s first collection of sides for the Chess label, packed with great tunes and untouchable performances by the man himself. The last word in electric Chicago blues, Wolf was possessed of fine guitar and harp skills, a voice that could separate skin from bone, and a sheer magnetism and charisma that knew (and has known) no equal. This disc is outstanding throughout, and features some of his best sides, including “How Many More Years,” “Smokestack Lightnin’,” “Evil,” and “I Asked for Water (She Gave Me Gasoline).” Highly recommended for the uninitiated and a must for collectors. -Rovi Staff, AllMusic Review

Song List:
Moanin’ At Midnight
How Many More Years
Smokestack Lightnin’
Baby How Long
No Place To Go (You Gonna Wreck My Life)
All Night Boogie (All Night Long)
Evil (Is Going On)
I’m Leavin’ You
Moanin’ for My Baby
I Asked For Water
Forty Four
Somebody In My Home

Videos of the Week:

Break On Through by The Doors

Down On Me by Janis Joplin (with Big Brother & The Holding Company)

For What Its Worth by Buffalo Springfield

My Back Pages by The Byrds

White Rabbit by The Jefferson Airplane

Solidarity Forever written by Ralph Chaplin and performed by Pete Seeger & The Almanac Singers

There Is Power In A Union written by Joe Hill and performed by Utah Phillips

The Tramp written by Joe Hill and performed by Joe Glazer & Bill Friedland

Blues for Dracula by Philly Joe Jones

Fiesta by Philly Joe Jones

Glen Gray & Casa Loma Orchestra

Headless Horseman by Kay Starr

Skeleton In The Closet by Nat Gonella & His Georgians

Swingin’ At The Seance by Glenn Miller & His Orchestra

No Place To Go by Howlin’ Wolf

Smokestack Lightening by Howlin’ Wolf

Spoonful by Howlin’ Wolf

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS: OverDrive & RBDigital:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive and/or the RBDigital app, to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading September 9, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Almost Midnight by Paul Doiron (Format: eBook):

In this thrilling entry in Edgar Award finalist Paul Doiron’s bestselling series, a deadly attack on one of Maine’s last wild wolves leads Game Warden Mike Bowditch to an even bigger criminal conspiracy.

While on vacation, Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch receives a strange summons from Billy Cronk, one of his oldest friends and a man he had to reluctantly put behind bars for murder. Billy wants him to investigate a new female prison guard with a mysterious past, and Mike feels honor-bound to help his friend. But when the guard becomes the victim in a brutal attack at the prison, he realizes there may be a darker cover-up at play—and that Billy and his family might be at risk.

Then Mike receives a second call for help, this time from a distant mountain valley where Shadow, a wolf-hybrid he once cared for, has been found shot by an arrow and clinging to life. He searches for the identity of the bowman, but his investigation is blocked at every turn by the increasingly hostile community. And when Billy’s wife and children are threatened, Mike finds himself tested like never before. How can he possibly keep the family safe when he has enemies of his own on his trail?

Torn between loyalties, Mike Bowditch must respond in the only way he knows how: by bending every law and breaking every rule to keep his loved ones safe and the true predators at bay.

Careful What You Wish For: A Novel of Suspense by Hallie Ephron (Format: eBook)

From the New York Times bestselling author of There Was an Old Woman comes a novel about a professional organizer with a deadly problem she may not be able to clean up.

Emily Harlow is a professional organizer who helps people declutter their lives; she’s married to man who can’t drive past a yard sale without stopping. He’s filled their basement, attic, and garage with his finds.

Like other professionals who make a living decluttering peoples’ lives, Emily has devised a set of ironclad rules. When working with couples, she makes clear that the client is only allowed to declutter his or her own stuff. That stipulation has kept Emily’s own marriage together these past few years. She’d love nothing better than to toss out all her husband’s crap. He says he’s a collector. Emily knows better—he’s a hoarder. The larger his “collection” becomes, the deeper the distance grows between Emily and the man she married.

Luckily, Emily’s got two new clients to distract herself: an elderly widow whose husband left behind a storage unit she didn’t know existed, and a young wife whose husband won’t allow her stuff into their house. Emily’s initial meeting with the young wife takes a detour when, after too much wine, the women end up fantasizing about how much more pleasant life would be without their collecting spouses.

But the next day Emily finds herself in a mess that might be too big for her to clean up. Careful what you wish for, the old adage says . . . now Emily might lose her freedom, her marriage . . . and possibly her life.

The Diary of a Bookseller written by Shaun Bythell, read by Robin Laing (Format: Downloadable Audiobook)

Shaun Bythell owns The Bookshop, Scotland’s largest second-hand bookshop. It contains 100,000 books, spread over a mile of shelving, with twisting corridors and roaring fires, and all set in a beautiful, rural town by the edge of the sea. A book-lover’s paradise? Well, almost … In these wry and hilarious diaries, Shaun provides an inside look at the trials and tribulations of life in the book trade, from struggles with eccentric customers to wrangles with his own staff, who include the ski-suit-wearing, bin-foraging Nicky. He takes us with him on buying trips to old estates and auction houses, recommends books-both lost classics and new discoveries-introduces us to the thrill of the unexpected find, and evokes the rhythms and charms of small-town life, always with a sharp and sympathetic eye.

Hilarious, wry, and charming, Shaun Bythell’s stories from his second-hand bookshop in remotest Scotland are sure to delight readers of all stripes.

Out East, Memoir of a Montauk Summer written by John Glynn & read by Michael Crouch (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

 A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house—a debut memoir of first love, identity and self-discovery among a group of friends who became family. They call Montauk the end of the world, a spit of land jutting into the Atlantic. The house was a ramshackle split-level set on a hill, and each summer thirty one people would sleep between its thin walls and shag carpets. Against the moonlight the house’s octagonal roof resembled a bee’s nest. It was dubbed The Hive.

In 2013, John Glynn joined the share house. Packing his duffel for that first Memorial Day Weekend, he prayed for clarity. At 27, he was crippled by an all-encompassing loneliness, a feeling he had carried in his heart for as long as he could remember. John didn’t understand the loneliness. He just knew it was there. Like the moon gone dark. OUT EAST is the portrait of a summer, of the Hive and the people who lived in it, and John’s own reckoning with a half-formed sense of self. From Memorial Day to Labor Day, The Hive was a center of gravity, a port of call, a home. Friendships, conflicts, secrets and epiphanies blossomed within this tightly woven friend group and came to define how they would live out the rest of their twenties and beyond. Blending the sand-strewn milieu of George Howe Colt’s The Big House, the radiant aching of Olivia Liang’s The Lonely City, OUT EAST is a keenly wrought story of love and transformation, longing and escape in our own contemporary moment. “An unforgettable story told with feeling and humor and above all with the razor-sharp skill of a delicate and highly gifted writer.” —Andre Aciman, New York Times bestselling author of Call Me by Your Name “Out East is full of intimacy and hope and frustration and joy, an extraordinary tale of emotional awakening and lacerating ambivalence, a confession of self-doubt that becomes self-knowledge.” —Andrew Solomon, National Book Award winner

Very Nice: A Novel by Marcy Dermansky (Format: eBook):

“A story of sex and intrigue set amid rich people in a beautiful house with a picturesque swimming pool… Very funny.” -Rumaan Alam, The Washington Post

A brilliantly funny novel of bad behavior in the post-Obama era, featuring a wealthy Connecticut divorcée, her college-age daughter, and the famous novelist who is seduced by them both.

Rachel Klein never meant to kiss her creative writing professor, but with his long eyelashes, his silky hair, and the sad, beautiful life he laid bare on Twitter, she does, and the kiss is very nice. Zahid Azzam never planned to become a houseguest in his student’s sprawling Connecticut home, but with the sparkling swimming pool, the endless supply of Whole Foods strawberries, and Rachel’s beautiful mother, he does, and the home is very nice. Becca Klein never thought she’d have a love affair so soon after her divorce, but when her daughter’s professor walks into her home, bringing with him an apricot standard poodle named Princess, she does, and the affair is…a very bad idea.

Zigzagging between the rarefied circles of Manhattan investment banking, the achingly self-serious MFA programs of the Midwest, and the private bedrooms of Connecticut, Very Nice is an audacious, addictive, and wickedly smart take on the way we live now.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

Ghost Fire by Wilbur A. Smith:

“1754. Inseparable since birth and growing up in India, Theo and Connie Courtney are torn apart by the tragic death of their parents. Theo, wracked with guilt, strikes a solitary path through life. Haunted by the spirits of lovers and family members, he is determined to atone for his mistakes. He seeks salvation in combat and conflict, joining the British in the war against the French and Indian army. Believing herself abandoned by her brother, and abused and brutalized by a series of corrupt guardians, Connie vows never to let any man own her. Instead, she uses her beauty to manipulate her way to France, where she is welcomed into high society. But Connie once again finds herself at the mercy of vicious men, whose appetite for war and glory lead her to the frontlines of the French battlefield in North America. As the siblings find their destinies converging once more, they realize that the vengeance and redemption they both desperately seek could cost them their lives . . .”–Amazon.com

Nottingham by Nathan Makaryk:

“England, 1191. King Richard is half a world away, fighting for God and his own ambition. Back home, his country languishes, bankrupt and on the verge of anarchy. People with power are running unchecked. People without are growing angry. And in Nottingham, one of the largest shires in England, the sheriff seems intent on doing nothing about it. As the leaves turn gold in the Sherwood Forest, the lives of six people, Arable, a servant girl with a secret, Robin and William, soldiers running from their pasts, Marion, a noblewoman working for change, Guy of Gisbourne, Nottingham’s beleaguered guard captain, and Elena Gamwell, a brash, ambitious thief, become intertwined. And a strange story begins to spread . . .”Back cover

On Fire The (Burning) Case For A Green New Deal by Naomi Klein

“For more than twenty years, Naomi Klein has been the foremost chronicler of the economic war waged on both people and planet-and an unapologetic champion of a sweeping environmental agenda with justice at its center. In lucid, elegant dispatches from the frontlines of contemporary natural disaster, she pens surging, indispensable essays for a wide public: prescient advisories and dire warnings of what future awaits us if we refuse to act, as well as hopeful glimpses of a far better future. On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal gathers for the first time more than a decade of her impassioned writing, and pairs it with new material on the staggeringly high stakes of our immediate political and economic choices. These long-form essays show Klein at her most prophetic and philosophical, investigating the climate crisis not only as a profound political challenge but as a spiritual and imaginative one, as well. Delving into topics ranging from the clash between ecological time and our culture of “perpetual now,” to the soaring history of humans changing and evolving rapidly in the face of grave threats, to rising white supremacy and fortressed borders as a form of “climate barbarism,” this is a rousing call to action for a planet on the brink. With reports spanning from the ghostly Great Barrier Reef, to the annual smoke-choked skies of the Pacific Northwest, to post-hurricane Puerto Rico, to a Vatican attempting an unprecedented “ecological conversion,” Klein makes the case that we will rise to the existential challenge of climate change only if we are willing to transform the systems that produced this crisis. An expansive, far-ranging exploration that sees the battle for a greener world as indistinguishable from the fight for our lives, On Fire captures the burning urgency of the climate crisis, as well as the fiery energy of a rising political movement demanding a catalytic Green New Deal”– Provided by publisher.

The Paris Orphan by Natasha Lester:

“New York City/Paris, 1942: When American model Jessica May arrives in Europe to cover the war as a photojournalist for Vogue, most of the soldiers are determined to make her life as difficult as possible. But three friendships change that. Journalist Martha Gellhorn encourages Jess to bend the rules. Captain Dan Hallworth keeps her safe in dangerous places so she can capture the stories that truly matter. And most important of all, the love of a little orphan named Victorine gives Jess strength to do the impossible. But her success will come at a price.”– Publisher’s description.

What Rose Forgot by Nevada Barr:

In New York Times bestselling author Nevada Barr’s gripping standalone, a grandmother in her sixties emerges from a mental fog to find she’s trapped in her worst nightmare Rose Dennis wakes up in a hospital gown, her brain in a fog, only to discover that she’s been committed to an Alzheimer’s Unit in a nursing home. With no memory of how she ended up in this position, Rose is sure that something is very wrong. When she overhears one of the administrators saying about her that she’s “not making it through the week,” Rose is convinced that if she’s to survive, she has to get out of the nursing home. She avoids taking her medication, putting on a show for the aides, then stages her escape. The only problem is–how does she convince anyone that she’s not actually demented? Her relatives were the ones to commit her, all the legal papers were drawn up, the authorities are on the side of the nursing home, and even she isn’t sure she sounds completely sane. But any lingering doubt Rose herself might have had is erased when a would-be killer shows up in her house in the middle of the night. Now Rose knows that someone is determined to get rid of her. With the help of her computer hacker/recluse sister Marion, thirteen-year old granddaughter Mel, and Mel’s friend Royal, Rose begins to gather her strength and fight back–to find out who is after her and take back control of her own life. But someone out there is still determined to kill Rose, and they’re holding all the cards.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive or the RB Digital app, to check out on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers September 15, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week ending September 8, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein:

An insightful Lab-terrier mix helps his owner, a struggling race car driver.

ASK AGAIN, YES by Mary Beth Keane:

The lives of neighboring families in a New York City suburb intertwine over four decades.

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

A BETTER MAN by Louise Penny:

The 15th book in the Chief Inspector Gamache series. The search for a missing girl is imperiled by rising floodwaters across the province.

THE BITTERROOTS by C.J. Box:

The fourth book in the Cassie Dewell series. The black sheep of an influential family is accused of assault.

THE DARK SIDE by Danielle Steel:

Painful childhood memories surface for Zoe Morgan when she has a child of her own.


THE GIRL WHO LIVED TWICE by David Lagercrantz:

Mikael Blomkvist helps Lisbeth Salander put her past behind her in the latest installment of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series.

GOLDFINCH by Donna Tartt:

After his mother is killed in a museum explosion, a young man grapples with the world alone while hiding a prized Dutch painting.

HOT SHOT by Fern Michaels:

The fifth book in the Men of the Sisterhood series. Trouble erupts when a community for seniors is built on a rival gang’s old stomping ground.

INLAND by Téa Obreht:

The lives of a frontierswoman and a former outlaw intersect in the unforgiving climate of the Arizona Territory in 1893.

THE INN by James Patterson and Candice Fox:

A former Boston police detective who is now an innkeeper must shield a seaside town from a crew of criminals.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist with a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

THE NEW GIRL by Daniel Silva:

Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter is kidnapped.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

OLD BONES by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child:

An expedition into the Sierra Nevada uncovers new twists to the events involving the Donner party.

ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci:

A World War II veteran on parole must find the real killer in a small town or face going back to jail.

OUTFOX by Sandra Brown:

F.B.I. Agent Drex Easton has a hunch that the conman Weston Graham is also a serial killer.

THE RECKONING by John Grisham:

A decorated World War II veteran shoots and kills a pastor inside a Mississippi church.

SAPPHIRE FLAMES by Ilona Andrews:

When her friend’s mother and sister are murdered, a magic user puts her own safety and reputation at risk.

SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides:

Theo Faber looks into the mystery of a famous painter who stops speaking after shooting her husband.

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

TURN OF THE KEY by Ruth Ware:

A nanny working in a technology-laden house in Scotland goes to jail when one of the children dies.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

NON-FICTION:

BAD BLOOD by John Carreyrou:

The rise and fall of the biotech startup Theranos.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates:

 A meditation on race in America.

BODY KEEPS THE SCORE by Bessel van der Kolk:

 How trauma affects the body and mind, and innovative treatments for recovery.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

THE BRITISH ARE COMING by Rick Atkinson:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist begins his Revolution Trilogy with events from 1775 to 1777

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST by Ibram X. Kendi:

A primer for creating a more just and equitable society through identifying and opposing racism.

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

 A civil rights lawyer and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates:

The philanthropist shares stories of empowering women to improve society.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

RADICALS, RESISTANCE AND REVENGE by Jeanine Pirro:

The Fox News host posits those she labels anti-Trump conspirators have committed possible crimes and a plot to destroy liberty.

THE RANGE by David Epstein:

An argument for how generalists excel more than specialists, especially in complex and unpredictable fields.

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

THANK YOU FOR MY SERVICE by Mat Best with Ross Patterson and Nils Parker:

An inside look into military life by the YouTube personality and former Army Ranger.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

WHITE FRAGILITY by Robin DiAngelo:

Historical and cultural analyses on what causes defensive moves by white people and how this inhibits cross-racial dialogue.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening September 6, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations of the week!

This week our five music recommendation are:

Green Onions by Booker T. Jones & The MG’s (Format: Music CD):

There’s not a note or a nuance out of place anywhere on this record, which featured 35 of the most exciting minutes of instrumental music in any category that one could purchase in 1962 (and it’s no slouch multiple decades out, either). “I Got a Woman” is the single best indicator of how superb this record is and this band was — listening to this track, it’s easy to forget that the song ever had lyrics or ever needed them, Booker T. Jones’ organ and Steve Cropper’s guitar serving as more-than-adequate substitutes for any singer. Their version of “Twist and Shout” is every bit as satisfying. Even “Mo’ Onions,” an effort to repeat the success of “Green Onions,” doesn’t repeat anything from the earlier track except the tempo, and Jones and Cropper both come up with fresh sounds within the same framework. “Behave Yourself” is a beautifully wrought piece of organ-based blues that gives Jones a chance to show off some surprisingly nimble-fingered playing, while “Stranger on the Shore” is transformed into a piece of prime soul music in the group’s hands. Just when it seems like the album has turned in all of the surprises in repertory that it could reasonably deliver, it ends with “Comin’ Home Baby,” a killer jazz piece on which Steve Cropper gets to shine, his guitar suddenly animated around Jones’ playing, his quietly trilled notes at the crescendo some of the most elegant guitar heard on an R&B record up to that time. Bruce Eder, AllMusic Review.

Song List:
1. Green Onions
2. Rinky-Dink
3. I Got a Woman
4. Mo’ Onions
5. Twist and Shout
6. Behave Yourself
7. Stranger on the Shore
8. Lonely Avenue
9. One Who really Loves You
10. Can’t Sit Down
11. A Woman, A Lover, A Friend
12. Comin’ Home Baby
13. Green Onions
14. Can’t Sit Down

Keeping Score: Revolutions in Music: Copland And The American Sound (Format: DVD):

Dealing notes like cards in a game of poker, Aaron Copland gambled on a new American sound. His roots in Brooklyn’s Jewish community, shuffled with depression-era jazz, folk music, and hymns earned him a hand flush with relentless innovation. How such an unlikely outsider managed to capture the spirit of a nation to create classics like Billy the Kid and Appalachian Spring is a tale possible only in America. In this episode of Keeping Score, Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony pare Copland and his music down to their essence, revealing the sound we now recognize as American. San Francisco Symphony Overview

Ola Belle Reed and Southern Mountain Music on the Mason Dixon Line by Henry Glasssie, Clifford R. Murphy & Douglas Dowling Peach (Format: Print Book with 2 CDs):

Born to a musical family in the mountains of Ashe County, North Carolina in 1913, Ola Belle Reed became a prolific songwriter and performer. Known for her unique style of banjo playing and singing, she became a mainstay of traditional old-time music on the radio, and inspired generations of bluegrass and old-time players. She was awarded a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1986. Ola Belle Reed died in 2002, yet her influence is still reverberating throughout old time and traditional music.

In 1966, folklorist Henry Glassie traveled from Philadelphia to the town of Oxford, Pennsylvania to see Alex & Ola Belle and the New River Boys and Girls play their exciting brand of Southern mountain music live, on the air, in the back of the Campbell’s Corner general store. Over the next two years, Glassie would record the deep repertoire of Ola Belle Reed – folk ballads, minstrel songs, country standards, and originals like “I’ve Endured,” penned by Ola Belle herself. Glassie also chronicled the remarkable story of the migration of communities from the Blue Ridge Mountains toward the Mason-Dixon Line prior to World War II. Over four decades later, in 2009, Maryland state folklorist Clifford Murphy struck out to discover if this rich musical tradition still existed in the small Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania towns where it once flourished. Murphy, amazed by what he encountered, began making audio recordings to document the descendants of Ola Belle’s musical legacy. –from The American Folklore Center site

The book includes two CDs.

Song List:
Disc 1
Title/Composer Performer
1 Uncloudy Day by Ola Belle Reed
2 My Home’s Across the Blue Ridge Mountain by Alex Campbell / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
3 Bringing in the Georgia Mail by Alex Campbell / Burl Kilby / Ola Belle Reed
4 Train 45 by Ola Belle Reed
5 The Worried Man Blues by Ola Belle Reed
6 Worried Man Blues by Burl Kilby / Ola Belle Reed
7 The Ranger’s Command by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
8 Big Kid’s Barroom by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
9 The Miller’s by Will Burl Kilby / Ola Belle Reed
10 Black Jack Davy by Burl Kilby / Ola Belle Reed
11 John Hardy by Alex Campbell / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
12 Single Girl by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
13 Kitty Wells by Burl Kilby / Ola Belle Reed
14 The Orphan Girl by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
15 I’ve Always Been a Rambler by Burl Kilby / Ola Belle Reed
16 Undone in Sorrow by Ola Belle Reed
17 You Led Me to the Wrong by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
18 Absalom My Son, My Son by Ola Belle Reed
19 Amazing Grace by John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
20 Six Feet of Earth by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
21 All the Dark Places by Ola Belle Reed
22 I’m Going Through by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
23 I’ve Endured by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed
24 I’ve Endured by Burl Kilby / John Miller / Ola Belle Reed

Disc 2
Title/Composer Performer
1 Undone in Sorrow by Hugh Campbell
2 Plucking the Strings by Dave Reed
3 Cherokee Shuffle by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
4 I’m Longing for a Love I’ll Never Know by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
5 Sally Goodin by Burl Kilby
6 Story of Tom Moore, the Gravedigger by Hugh Campbell
7 Footprints Left Below by Hugh Campbell
8 Leave It There by DeBusk-Weaver Family
9 Six Hours on the Cross by DeBusk-Weaver Family
10 John Hardy by Dave Reed
11 Cherokee Eyes by Zane Campbell
12 High on a Mountain by Burl Kilby
13 Fiddle on the Wall by Hugh Campbell
14 Rachel by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
15 The Old Swinging Bridge by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
16 John Hardy by John Henry/Dave Reed
17 Stolen Love by Hugh Campbell / Zane Campbell
18 The Buzzard and the Monkey by Burton DeBusk
19 The Pussycat and the Bulldog by Burton DeBusk
20 Preacher and the Bear by Dave Reed
21 Turkey in the Straw by Burl Kilby
22 Ryestraw by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
23 The Butcher Boy by Hugh Campbell / Dave Reed
24 Simple Man by Dave Reed
25 1,000 Light Years Away by Dave Reed
26 I Feel Like Traveling On by DeBusk-Weaver Family
27 New River Train by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
28 Salt Creek by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
29 Cumberland Gap by Burl Kilby
30 Boxes Full of Memories by Hugh Campbell
31 Father, Listen by Hugh Campbell
32 My Home’s Across the Blue Ridge Mountains by T.J. Lundy / Danny Paisley / Ryan Paisley
33 Family Graveyard by Zane Campbell
34 Over in the Gloryland by Hugh Campbell / Zane Campbell / DeBusk-Weaver Family / Dave Reed

Respect Yourself: Stax Records And The Soul Explosion by Robert Gordon with a foreword by Booker T. Jones (Format: Print Book):

The story of Stax Records unfolds like a Greek tragedy. A white brother and sister build a monument to racial harmony in blighted south Memphis during the civil rights movement. Their success soon pits the siblings against each other, and the brother abandons his sister for a visionary African-American partner. Under integrated leadership, Stax explodes as a national player until, Icarus-like, the heights they achieve result in their tragic demise. They fall, losing everything, and the sanctuary they created is torn to the ground. A generation later, Stax is rebuilt brick by brick and is once again transforming disenfranchised youth into stellar young musicians.

Set in the world of 1960s and ’70s soul music, Respect Yourself is a character-driven story of racial integration, and then of black power and economic independence. It’s about music and musicians—Isaac Hayes, Otis Redding, the Staple Singers, and Booker T. and the M.G.’s, Stax’s interracial house band. It’s about a small independent company’s struggle to survive in an increasingly conglomerate-oriented world. And always at the center of the story is Memphis, Tennessee, an explosive city struggling through volatile years. Told by one of our leading music chroniclers, Respect Yourself is the book to own about one of our most treasured cultural institutions and the city that created it.

So Much In Love! (1962) by Ray Conniff Singers (Format: Music CD):

So Much in Love, like the earlier albums It’s the Talk of the Town and Young at Heart, shifts the emphasis away from Ray Conniff’s trademark blend of voices and instruments to concentrate on the vocal chorus. One of Conniff’s favorite tricks is to split the chorus and give the men and women contrasting vocal lines, and that technique is used throughout the album. “Autumn Leaves” and “Chances Are” turn the spotlight on the women, “Just Walking in the Rain” is handled mostly by the men, and the combined chorus brings a majestic lushness to “I Wish I Didn’t Love You So.” So Much in Love made the Top Five on the album charts in 1962, showing what a huge adult audience still existed for traditional pop music in the rock & roll era. There are no snappy rhythms or “tic tac” electric basslines on So Much in Love — it is a straight choral pop album with orchestral accompaniment and classic songs. Greg Adams, AllMusic Review.

Song List:
1. Autumn Leaves/Just Walking In The Rain
2. I Fall In Love Woo Easily/My Heart Stood Still
3. Dancing On The Ceiling/Dancing In The Dark Timing
4. I Wish I Didn’t Love You So/Bewitched
5. Whatever Will Be, Will Be/True Love
6. Chances Are/It’s Not For Me To Say

Videos of the Week:

Gee Whiz by Carla Thomas

Green Onions by Booker T & The MG’s

Time Is Tight by Booker T & The MG’s

Tiny Desk Concert by Booker T Jones

Appalachian Spring (Orchestral suite) composed by Aaron Copland, performed by the Ulster Orchestra, Thierry Fischer conducting

Fanfare for the Common Man composed by Aaron Copland, performed by the New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein conducting

Morning On the Ranch composed by Aaron Copland, performed by The Saint Louis Symphony, Leonard Slatkin conducting

Gonna Write Me A Letter by Ola Belle Reed

I’ve Endured by Ola Belle Reed

Undone in Sorrow by Ola Belle Reed

In The Midnight Hour by Wilson Pickett


Knock On Wood by Eddie Floyd

Last Night by Mar-Keys

Sookie Sookie by Don Covay

Soul Man by Sam & Dave

Autumn Leaves/Just Walking In The Rain by the Ray Conniff Singers

Dancing On The Ceiling/Dancing In The Dark Timing by the Ray Conniff Singers

Jackie Gleason Music For Lovers Only The Jackie Gleason Orchestra

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

The American Folk Life Center.
Copland And The American Sound. PBS Online. http://www.pbs.org/keepingscore/copland-american-sound.html

Keeping Score: Aaron Copland And The American Sound. The San Francisco Symphony, https://www.keepingscore.org/content/aaron-coplands-appalachian-spring

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS: OverDrive & RBDigital:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive and/or the RBDigital app, to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading September 3, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

The Editor by Steven Rowley:

From the bestselling author of Lily and the Octopus comes a novel about a struggling writer who gets his big break, with a little help from the most famous woman in America.

After years of trying to make it as a writer in 1990s New York City, James Smale finally sells his novel to an editor at a major publishing house: none other than Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Jackie–or Mrs. Onassis, as she’s known in the office–has fallen in love with James’s candidly autobiographical novel, one that exposes his own dysfunctional family. But when the book’s forthcoming publication threatens to unravel already fragile relationships, both within his family and with his partner, James finds that he can’t bring himself to finish the manuscript.

Jackie and James develop an unexpected friendship, and she pushes him to write an authentic ending, encouraging him to head home to confront the truth about his relationship with his mother. Then a long-held family secret is revealed, and he realizes his editor may have had a larger plan that goes beyond the page…

From the bestselling author of Lily and the Octopus comes a funny, poignant, and highly original novel about an author whose relationship with his very famous book editor will change him forever–both as a writer and a son.

Fools and Mortals: A Novel by Bernard Cornwell:

New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell makes a dramatic departure with this enthralling, action-packed standalone novel that tells the story of the first production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream—as related by William Shakespeare’s estranged younger brother.

Lord, what fools these mortals be . . .

In the heart of Elizabethan England, Richard Shakespeare dreams of a glittering career in one of the London playhouses, a world dominated by his older brother, William. But he is a penniless actor, making ends meet through a combination of a beautiful face, petty theft and a silver tongue. As William’s star rises, Richard’s onetime gratitude is souring and he is sorely tempted to abandon family loyalty.

So when a priceless manuscript goes missing, suspicion falls upon Richard, forcing him onto a perilous path through a bawdy and frequently brutal London. Entangled in a high-stakes game of duplicity and betrayal which threatens not only his career and potential fortune, but also the lives of his fellow players, Richard has to call on all he has now learned from the brightest stages and the darkest alleyways of the city. To avoid the gallows, he must play the part of a lifetime . ..

Showcasing the superb storytelling skill that has won Bernard Cornwell international renown, Fools and Mortals is a richly portrayed tour de force that brings to life a vivid world of intricate stagecraft, fierce competition, and consuming ambition.

The Lost Vintage: A Novel by Ann Mah:

Sweetbitter meets The Nightingale in this page-turning novel about a woman who returns to her family’s ancestral vineyard in Burgundy and unexpectedly uncovers a lost diary, an unknown relative, and a secret her family has been keeping since World War II.

To become one of only a few hundred certified wine experts in the world, Kate must pass the notoriously difficult Master of Wine examination. She’s failed twice before; her third attempt will be her last chance. Suddenly finding herself without a job and with the test a few months away, she travels to Burgundy to spend the fall at the vineyard estate that has belonged to her family for generations. There she can bolster her shaky knowledge of Burgundian vintages and reconnect with her cousin Nico and his wife, Heather, who now oversee day-to-day management of the grapes. The one person Kate hopes to avoid is Jean-Luc, a talented young winemaker and her first love.

At the vineyard house, Kate is eager to help her cousin clean out the enormous basement that is filled with generations of discarded and forgotten belongings. Deep inside the cellar, behind a large armoire, she discovers a hidden room containing a cot, some Resistance pamphlets, and an enormous cache of valuable wine. Piqued by the secret space, Kate begins to dig into her family’s history—a search that takes her back to the dark days of World War II and introduces her to a relative she never knew existed, a great–half aunt who was a teenager during the Nazi occupation.

As she learns more about her family, the line between resistance and collaboration blurs, driving Kate to find the answers to two crucial questions: Who, exactly, did her family aid during the difficult years of the war? And what happened to six valuable bottles of wine that seem to be missing from the cellar’s collection?

If you enjoyed Sarah’s Key and Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale, then this wonderful book by Ann Mah is for you.” — Tatiana de Rosnay

Sweetbitter meets The Nightingale in this page-turning novel about a woman who returns to her family’s ancestral vineyard in Burgundy and unexpectedly uncovers a lost diary, an unknown relative, and a secret her family has been keeping since World War II.

The Midnight Man: Canterbury Tales Mystery Series, Book 7 by Paul Doherty:

In Doherty’s solid seventh Canterbury Tales medieval mystery (after 2009’s A Haunt of Murder), the physician delivers a blood-curdling account of the depredations of the so-called Midnight Man, described as “a warlock well-served by the knights of hell.” Doherty doesn’t stint on the number of puzzles Brother Anselm, principal exorcist to the archbishop of Canterbury, has to unravel. They include a locked-room murder, the apparent haunting of a church by ghosts, the question of whether the activities of the Midnight Man’s coven are connected with some missing buried treasure, and the disappearance of young women in the vicinity. Despite the number of balls in the air, Doherty drops nary a one as he provides another intriguing look at the past through the lens of a murder inquiry. — Publishers Weekly

The Sparsholt Affair by Alan Hollinghurst:

“Readers of [The Stranger’s Child]—or of Hollinghurst’s earlier The Line of Beauty…will find much that is familiar here, stylistically and thematically. As always, Hollinghurst writes classically beautiful prose, which…is constantly intelligent, alert and mobile…As the story moves forward in time, Hollinghurst achieves the kind of symphonic effect we normally associate with much longer books, like Proust’s In Search of Lost Time or Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time. People we first met as students in the 1940s return in new guises: A writer is famous, then forgotten, then the subject of scholarly revival; the teenage David turns into a father, then a grandfather. The effect is moving, and Hollinghurst writes with a wisdom and understanding only available to an experienced writer working with his favorite themes. By the end of the novel, the mystery of David Sparsholt hasn’t quite been solved, but it has served its purpose—as the absent center of a beautiful and complex design.– The New York Times Book Review – Adam Kirsch

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

Biloxi: A Novel by Mary Miller:

Mary Miller seizes the mantle of southern literature with Biloxi, a tender, gritty tale of middle age and the unexpected turns a life can take.

Building on her critically acclaimed novel The Last Days of California and her biting collection Always Happy Hour, Miller transports readers to this delightfully wry, unapologetic corner of the south—Biloxi, Mississippi, home to sixty-three-year-old Louis McDonald, Jr.

Louis has been forlorn since his wife of thirty-seven years left him, his father passed, and he impulsively retired from his job in anticipation of an inheritance check that may not come. These days he watches reality television and tries to avoid his ex-wife and daughter, benefiting from the charity of his former brother-in-law, Frank, who religiously brings over his Chili’s leftovers and always stays for a beer.

Yet the past is no predictor of Louis’s future. On a routine trip to Walgreens to pick up his diabetes medication, he stops at a sign advertising free dogs and meets Harry Davidson, a man who claims to have more than a dozen canines on offer, but offers only one: an overweight mixed breed named Layla. Without any rational explanation, Louis feels compelled to take the dog home, and the two become inseparable. Louis, more than anyone, is dumbfounded to find himself in love—bursting into song with improvised jingles, exploring new locales, and reevaluating what he once considered the fixed horizons of his life.

With her “sociologist’s eye for the mundane and revealing” (Joyce Carol Oates, New York Review of Books), Miller populates the Gulf Coast with Ann Beattie-like characters. A strangely heartwarming tale of loneliness, masculinity, and the limitations of each, Biloxi confirms Miller’s position as one of our most gifted and perceptive writers.

Everything Inside: Stories by Edwidge Danticat:

Named a Highly Anticipated Book of Summer 2019 by Lit Hub, Esquire, Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, BuzzFeed, TIME, Good Housekeeping, Bustle, and BookRiot

From the internationally acclaimed, best-selling author of Brother, I’m Dying, a collection of vividly imagined stories about community, family, and love.

Rich with hard-won wisdom and humanity, set in locales from Miami and Port-au-Prince to a small unnamed country in the Caribbean and beyond, Everything Inside is at once wide in scope and intimate, as it explores the forces that pull us together, or drive us apart, sometimes in the same searing instant.

In these eight powerful, emotionally absorbing stories, a romance unexpectedly sparks between two wounded friends; a marriage ends for what seem like noble reasons, but with irreparable consequences; a young woman holds on to an impossible dream even as she fights for her survival; two lovers reunite after unimaginable tragedy, both for their country and in their lives; a baby’s christening brings three generations of a family to a precarious dance between old and new; a man falls to his death in slow motion, reliving the defining moments of the life he is about to lose.

This is the indelible work of a keen observer of the human heart–a master at her best.

Love And Death Among The Cheetahs by Rhys Bowen:

Georgie and Darcy are finally on their honeymoon in Kenya’s Happy Valley, but murder crashes the party in this all-new installment in the New York Times bestselling series.

I was so excited when Darcy announced out of the blue that we were flying to Kenya for our extended honeymoon. Now that we are here, I suspect he has actually been sent to fulfill another secret mission. I am trying very hard not to pick a fight about it, because after all, we are in paradise! Darcy finally confides that there have been robberies in London and Paris. It seems the thief was a member of the aristocracy and may have fled to Kenya. Since we are staying in the Happy Valley—the center of upper-class English life—we are well positioned to hunt for clues and ferret out possible suspects.

Now that I am a sophisticated married woman, I am doing my best to sound like one. But crikey! These aristocrats are a thoroughly loathsome sort enjoying a completely decadent lifestyle filled with wild parties and rampant infidelity. And one of the leading lights in the community, Lord Cheriton, has the nerve to make a play for me. While I am on my honeymoon! Of course, I put an end to that right off.

When he is found bloodied and lifeless along a lonely stretch of road, it appears he fell victim to a lion. But it seems that the Happy Valley community wants to close the case a bit too quickly. Darcy and I soon discover that there is much more than a simple robbery and an animal attack to contend with here in Kenya. Nearly everyone has a motive to want Lord Cheriton dead and some will go to great lengths to silence anyone who asks too many questions. The hunt is on! I just hope I can survive my honeymoon long enough to catch a killer. . . .

The March Sisters: On Life, Death & Little Women by Kate Bolick:

For the 150th anniversary of the publication of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, Kate Bolick, Jenny Zhang, Carmen Maria Machado, and Jane Smiley explore their strong lifelong personal engagement with Alcott’s novel—what it has meant to them and why it still matters. Each takes as her subject one of the four March sisters, reflecting on their stories and what they have to teach us about life. Kate Bolick finds parallels in oldest sister Meg’s brush with glamour at the Moffats’ ball and her own complicated relationship with clothes. Jenny Zhang confesses to liking Jo least among the sisters when she first read the novel as a girl, uncomfortable in finding so much of herself in a character she feared was too unfeminine. Carmen Maria Machado writes about the real-life tragedy of Lizzie Alcott, the inspiration for third sister Beth, and the horror story that can result from not being the author of your own life’s narrative. And Jane Smiley rehabilitates the reputation of youngest sister Amy, whom she sees as a modern feminist role model for those of us who are, well, not like the fiery Jo. These four voices come together to form a deep, funny, far-ranging meditation on the power of great literature to shape our lives. – Synopsis from The Library of Congress

The Storyteller’s Secret: A Novel by Sejal Badani:

From the bestselling author of Trail of Broken Wings comes an epic story of the unrelenting force of love, the power of healing, and the invincible desire to dream.

Nothing prepares Jaya, a New York journalist, for the heartbreak of her third miscarriage and the slow unraveling of her marriage in its wake. Desperate to assuage her deep anguish, she decides to go to India to uncover answers to her family’s past.

Intoxicated by the sights, smells, and sounds she experiences, Jaya becomes an eager student of the culture. But it is Ravi—her grandmother’s former servant and trusted confidant—who reveals the resilience, struggles, secret love, and tragic fall of Jaya’s pioneering grandmother during the British occupation. Through her courageous grandmother’s arrestingly romantic and heart-wrenching story, Jaya discovers the legacy bequeathed to her and a strength that, until now, she never knew was possible.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive or the RB Digital app, to check out on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.