Suggested Reading August 19, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Killing with Confetti by Peter Lovesey (Format: eBook):

Peter Lovesey, MWA Grand Master and titan of the English detective novel, returns readers to Bath with the eighteenth mystery in his critically acclaimed Peter Diamond series.
As a New Year begins in Bath, Ben Brace proposes to his long-term girlfriend, Caroline, the daughter of notorious crime baron Joe Irving, who is coming to the end of a prison sentence. The problem is that Ben’s father, George, is the Deputy Chief Constable. A more uncomfortable set of in-laws would be hard to imagine. But mothers and sons are a formidable force: a wedding in the Abbey and reception in the Roman Baths are arranged before the career-obsessed DCC can step in.

Peter Diamond, Bath’s head of CID, is appalled to be put in charge of security on the day. Ordered to be discreet, he packs a gun and a guest list in his best suit and must somehow cope with potential killers, gang rivals, warring parents, bossy photographers and straying bridesmaids. The laid-back Joe Irving seems oblivious to the danger he is in from rival gang leaders, while Brace can’t wait for the day to end. Will the photo session be a literal shoot? Will Joe Irving’s speech as father of the bride be his last words? Can Diamond pull off a miracle, avert a tragedy and send the happy couple on their honeymoon?

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The Memory of Love by Aminatta Forna (Format: eBook):

“[A] luminous tale of passion and betrayal” set in the post-colonial and civil war eras of Sierra Leone (The New York Times).

Winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book

As a decade of civil war and political unrest comes to a devastating close, three men must reconcile themselves to their own fate and the fate of their broken nation. For Elias Cole, this means reflecting on his time as a young scholar in 1969 and the affair that defined his life. For Adrian Lockheart, it means listening to Elias’s tale and following his own heart into a heated romance. For Elias’s doctor, Kai Mansaray, it’s desperately battling his nightmares by trying to heal his patients.

As each man’s story becomes inexorably bound with the others’, they discover that they are connected not only by their shared heritage, pain, and shame, but also by one remarkable woman.

The Memory of Love is a beautiful and ambitious exploration of the influence history can have on generations, and the shared cultural burdens that each of us inevitably face.

“A soft-spoken story of brutality and endurance set in postwar Sierra Leone . . . Tragedy and its aftermath are affectingly, memorably evoked in this multistranded narrative from a significant talent.” —Kirkus Reviews

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One Good Deed read by David Baldacci and read by Edoardo Ballerini (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

The #1 New York Times bestselling author David Baldacci introduces an unforgettable new character: Archer, a straight-talking former World War II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

It’s 1949. When war veteran Aloysius Archer is released from Carderock Prison, he is sent to Poca City on parole with a short list of do’s and a much longer list of don’ts: do report regularly to his parole officer, don’t go to bars, certainly don’t drink alcohol, do get a job-and don’t ever associate with loose women.

The small town quickly proves more complicated and dangerous than Archer’s years serving in the war or his time in jail. Within a single night, his search for gainful employment-and a stiff drink-leads him to a local bar, where he is hired for what seems like a simple job: to collect a debt owed to a powerful local businessman, Hank Pittleman.

Soon Archer discovers that recovering the debt won’t be so easy. The indebted man has a furious grudge against Hank and refuses to pay; Hank’s clever mistress has her own designs on Archer; and both Hank and Archer’s stern parole officer, Miss Crabtree, are keeping a sharp eye on him.

When a murder takes place right under Archer’s nose, police suspicions rise against the ex-convict, and Archer realizes that the crime could send him right back to prison . . . if he doesn’t use every skill in his arsenal to track down the real killer.

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Seeing Red by Dana Dratch (Format: eBook):

If it wasn’t for art thieves, spies and killers, Alex Vlodnachek’s life would be bliss.

Her freelance career is catching fire. Her relationship with B&B owner Ian Sterling is flirty and fun. She’s even attending a glittering cocktail party at his sprawling Victorian inn.

But, to this ex-reporter, something seems “off.” And it’s not the canapés. When Ian’s father vanishes, the enigmatic innkeeper asks for her discretion. And her assistance.

Meanwhile, Alex is having the opposite problem at her tiny bungalow: People keep piling in uninvited. Including a mysterious intruder found sleeping in her kitchen. Her grandmother, Baba, who shows up “to help”—with Alex’s own mother hot on her heels.

When the intrepid redhead discovers a body in the B&B’s basement and a “reproduction” Renoir in the library, she begins to suspect that Ian is more than just a simple hotel owner.

With editor pal Trip, brother Nick, and rescue-pup Lucy riding shotgun, Alex scrambles to stay one step ahead of disaster—and some very nasty characters.

Can she find the missing man before it’s too late? Or will Alex be the next one to disappear?

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The Summer of Ellen by Agnete Friis (Format: eBook):

Agnete Friis’s lyrical, evocative work of psychological suspense weaves together two periods in one man’s life to explore obsession, toxic masculinity, and the tricks we play on our own memory.

Jacob, a middle-aged architect living in Copenhagen, is in the alcohol-soaked throes of a bitter divorce when he receives an unexpected call from his great-uncle Anton. In his nineties and still living with his brother on their rural Jutland farm—a place Jacob hasn’t visited since the summer of 1978—Anton remains haunted by a single question: What happened to Ellen?

To find out, Jacob must return to the farm and confront what took place that summer—one defined by his teenage obsession with Ellen, a beautiful young hippie from the local commune, and the unsolved disappearance of a local girl. In revisiting old friends and rivals, Jacob discovers the tragedies that have haunted him for over forty years were not what they seemed.
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PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

1919 by Eve L. Ewing:

O Magazine Best Books by Women of Summer 2019
Chicago Tribune 25 hot books of summer 2019
The Millions Must-Read Poetry of June 2019
LitHub Most Anticipated Reads of Summer 2019
Buzzfeed 29 Summer Books To Get Excited About
Chicago Review of Books Best New Books of June 2019

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, the most intense of the riots comprising the nation’s Red Summer, has shaped the last century but is not widely discussed. In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing explores the story of this event—which lasted eight days and resulted in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries—through poems recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city. Ewing uses speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to recast history, and illuminates the thin line between the past and the present.

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Death In A Budapest Butterfly by Julia Buckley:

Hana Keller serves up European-style cakes and teas in her family-owned tea house, but when a customer keels over from a poisoned cuppa, Hana and her tea-leaf reading grandmother will have to help catch a killer in the first Hungarian Tea House Mystery from Julia Buckley.

Hana Keller and her family run Maggie’s Tea House, an establishment heavily influenced by the family’s Hungarian heritage and specializing in a European-style traditional tea service. But one of the shop’s largest draws is Hana’s eccentric grandmother, Juliana, renowned for her ability to read the future in the leaves at the bottom of customers’ cups. Lately, however, her readings have become alarmingly ominous and seemingly related to old Hungarian legends…

When a guest is poisoned at a tea event, Juliana’s dire predictions appear to have come true. Things are brought to a boil when Hana’s beloved Anna Weatherley butterfly teacup becomes the center of the murder investigation as it carried the poisoned tea. The cup is claimed as evidence by a handsome police detective, and the pretty Tea House is suddenly endangered. Hana and her family must catch the killer to save their business and bring the beautiful Budapest Butterfly back home where it belongs.

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Inland: A Novel by Téa Obreht:

The New York Times bestselling author of The Tiger’s Wife returns with “a bracingly epic and imaginatively mythic journey across the American West” (Entertainment Weekly).

In the lawless, drought-ridden lands of the Arizona Territory in 1893, two extraordinary lives unfold. Nora is an unflinching frontierswoman awaiting the return of the men in her life—her husband, who has gone in search of water for the parched household, and her elder sons, who have vanished after an explosive argument. Nora is biding her time with her youngest son, who is convinced that a mysterious beast is stalking the land around their home.

Meanwhile, Lurie is a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts. He sees lost souls who want something from him, and he finds reprieve from their longing in an unexpected relationship that inspires a momentous expedition across the West. The way in which Lurie’s death-defying trek at last intersects with Nora’s plight is the surprise and suspense of this brilliant novel.

Mythical, lyrical, and sweeping in scope, Inland is grounded in true but little-known history. It showcases all of Téa Obreht’s talents as a writer, as she subverts and reimagines the myths of the American West, making them entirely—and unforgettably—her own.

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In The Shadows of Spindrift House by Mira Grant:

For Harlowe Upton-Jones, life has never been a straight line. Shipped off to live with her paternal grandparents after a mysterious cult killed her mother and father, she has grown up chasing the question behind the curve, becoming part of a tight-knit teen detective agency. But “teen” is a limited time offer, and when her friends start looking for adult professions, it’s up to Harlowe to find them one last case so that they can go out in a blaze of glory.

Welcome to Spindrift House. The stories and legends surrounding the decrepit property are countless and contradictory, but one thing is clear: there are people willing to pay a great deal to determine the legal ownership of the house. When Harlowe and her friends agree to investigate the mystery behind the manor, they do so on the assumption that they’ll be going down in history as the ones who determined who built Spindrift House – and why.

The house has secrets. They have the skills. They have a plan. They have everything they need to solve the mystery. Everything they need except for time. Because Spindrift House keeps its secrets for a reason, and it has no intention of letting them go. Nature abhors a straight line. Here’s where the story bends.

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Rocket To The Morgue by Anthony Boucher:

Legendary science fiction author Fowler Faulkes may be dead, but his creation, the iconic Dr. Derringer, lives on in popular culture. Or, at least, the character would live on if not for Faulkes’s predatory and greedy heir Hilary, who, during his time as the inflexible guardian of the estate, has created countless enemies in the relatively small community of writers of the genre. So when he is stabbed nearly to death in a room with only one door, which nobody was seen entering or exiting, Foulkes suspects a writer. Fearing that the assailant will return, he asks for police protection, and when more potentially-fatal encounters follow, it becomes clear to Detective Terry Marshall and his assistant, the inquisitive nun, Sister Ursula, that death awaits Mr. Foulkes around every corner. Now, they’ll have to work overtime to thwart the would-be murderer―a task that requires a deep dive into the strange, idiosyncratic world of science fiction in its early days.

With characters based heavily on Anthony Boucher’s friends at the Manana Literary Society, including Robert Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and Jack Parsons, Rocket to the Morgue is both a classic locked room mystery and an enduring portrait of a real-life writing community. Reprinted for the first time in over thirty years, the book is a must-read for fans of mysteries and science fiction alike.

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Book descriptions are provided by the publishers unless otherwise specified.

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Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive or the RB Digital app, to check out on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers August 25, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that ends August 25, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein:

An insightful Lab-terrier mix helps his owner, a struggling race car driver.

ASK AGAIN, YES by Mary Beth Keane:

The lives of neighboring families in a New York City suburb intertwine over four decades.

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

BELOVED by Toni Morrison:

Winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. A former slave living in Ohio is haunted by events at the Kentucky plantation from which she escaped 18 years ago.

CHANCES ARE …by Richard Russo:

Three men in their 60s who met in college reunite on Martha’s Vineyard, where mysterious events occurred in 1971.

CITY OF GIRLS by Elizabeth Gilbert:

An 89-year-old Vivian Morris looks back at the direction her life took when she entered the 1940s New York theater scene.

DANGEROUS MAN by Robert Crais:

Elvis Cole and Joe Pike get more than they bargained for when they investigate the abduction of a bank teller.

EVVIE DRAKE STARTS OVER by Linda Holmes:

In a seaside town in Maine, a former Major League pitcher and a grieving widow assess their pasts.

THE INN by James Patterson and Candice Fox:

A former Boston police detective who is now an innkeeper must shield a seaside town from a crew of criminals.

LAST HOUSE GUEST by Megan Miranda:

Avery Greer must fight the clock to clear her name and uncover her friend’s real killer.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

NEW GIRL by Daniel Silva:

Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter is kidnapped.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci:

A World War II veteran on parole must find the real killer in a small town or face going back to jail.

OUTFOX by Sandra Brown:

F.B.I. Agent Drex Easton has a hunch that the conman Weston Graham is also a serial killer.

THE RECKONING by John Grisham:

A decorated World War II veteran shoots and kills a pastor inside a Mississippi church.

SUMMER OF ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand:

The Levin family undergoes dramatic events with a son in Vietnam, a daughter in protests and dark secrets hiding beneath the surface.

TURN OF THE KEY by Ruth Ware:

A nanny working in a technology-laden house in Scotland goes to jail when one of the children dies.

UNDER CURRENTS by Nora Roberts:

Echoes of a violent childhood reverberate for Zane Bigelow when he starts a new kind of family in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

NON-FICTION:.

BAD BLOOD by John Carreyrou:

The rise and fall of the biotech startup Theranos.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates:

A meditation on race in America.

THE BODY KEEPS THE SCORE by Bessel van der Kolk:

How trauma affects the body and mind, and innovative treatments for recovery.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

CALYPSO by David Sedaris:

A collection of comedic stories on mortality, middle age and a beach house dubbed the Sea Section.

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

JUSTICE ON TRIAL by Mollie Hemingway and Carrie Severino:

The conservative authors give their take on the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

A civil rights lawyer and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates:

The philanthropist shares stories of empowering women to improve society.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

THE RANGE by David Epstein:

An argument for how generalists excel more than specialists, especially in complex and unpredictable fields.

SECOND MOUNTAIN by David Brooks:

A New York Times Op-Ed columnist espouses having an outward focus to attain a meaningful life.

THE SOURCE OF SELF-REGARD by Toni Morrison:

A collection of essays and speeches written over four decades, including a eulogy for James Baldwin and the author’s Nobel lecture.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Free Friday Film Schedule September 2019 – February 2020

Hi everyone, September is quickly approaching and we are readying a great plate of programs for fall at SSL!

One of our returning programs will be our Free Friday Film series. The first film for this season, If Beale Street Could Talk, will be shown on Friday, September 13 and here is the schedule for the first six months of the fall/winter season – photos followed by a link to a PDF in case anyone wishes to print off the schedule.

Monthly Friday Free Films September 2019 – February 2020

Enjoy your weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Suggested Listening August 16, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our lucky seven musical streaming* suggestions for the week.

Dave Digs Disney (1957) by The Dave Brubeck Quartet (Genre: Jazz, Easy Listening):

In the mid-fifties, Dave Brubeck took his family to visit Disneyland, found the visit inspiring, came home from vacation and recorded an album of Disney classics!

Song List: Alice in Wonderland, Give a Little Whistle, Heigh-Ho! (The Dwarfs’ Marching Song), When You Wish Upon A Star, Some Day My Prince Will Come, One Song, Very Good Advice and So This Is Love.

Texas (2019) by Rodney Crowell (Genre: Country):

Texas is the brand new album by country great Rodney Crowell, check it out!

Forty-two years after the release of his first album, 1977s’ Ain’t Living Long Like This, he’s still going strong! And for this fun LP he’s joined by some equally cool quests artists including Randy Rodgers, Lee Ann Womack, Ray Kennedy, Vince Gill, Billy Gibbons, Ronnie Dunn, Willie Nelson, Ringo Starr, Lyle Lovett, John Jorgenson & Steve Earle.

Song List: Flatland Hillbillies, Caw Caw Blues, 56 Fury, Deep In The Heart of Uncertain Texas, You’re Only Happy When You’re Miserable, I’ll Show Me, What You Gonna’ Do Now, The Border, Treeptop Slim & Billy Lowgrass, Brown & Root, Brown & Root, Texas Drought, Pt. 1.

16 Most Requested Songs by Xavier Cugat & His Orchestra (Genres: Easy Listening, Big Band):

Xavier Cugat, a bandleader and violinist, was a member of the first generation of Latin American musicians to record music and in the 1930s and 1940s. He played both mainstream popular music and Latin music, bringing Latin forms of music, including the mambo, rhumba, the tango and the cha-cha to a wider audience by incorporating those musical forms into his band’s repertoire. He parlayed his musical career into a companion film career making appearances in a multitude of films from 1930s’ In Gay Madrid to 1959s’ Desire Diabolique and continued to play professionally into the 1970s.

If you’re not familiar with Xavier Cugat’s music, check out this neat collection!

Song List: Chica, Chica, Boom, Chic, Brazil, Thanks For The Dream, Amor, Tico-Tico, Good, Good, Good, My Shawl, Oye Negra, Walter Winchell Rhumb, You, So It’s You, Jalousie (Jealousy), The Masked One, Rhumba At The Waldorf, Miami Beach Rhumba, Cuanto Le Gusta and South America, Take It Away.

Four O’clock Blues by Memphis Slim (Genre: Blues, Piano):

A great collection of music by Memphis Slim, barrel-house boogie-woogie pianist extraordinaire!
Song List: Four O’clock Blues, Trouble in Mind, Roll and Tumble, Cow Cow Blues, Crowing Rooster, The Bells, Lord Have Mercy On Me, My Baby Don’t Love Me, Pinetop Boogie, Boogie After Midnight, Slim’s Blues, Mother Earth, Guess I’m A Fool Rockin’ The Pad, Marack, Really Got The Blues, Tijuana and Blues For My Baby.

Other Girls (2019) by Lillie Mae (Genre: Country):

Other Girls is the brand new album by the multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter Lillie Mae who tells like she sees it!

Songs List: You’ve Got Other Girls For That, Crips & Cold, I Came For The Band, Whole Blue Heart, How?, A Golden Year, At Least Three in This Room, Some Gamble, Didn’t!, Terlingua Girl & Love Dilly Love.

We’ll Meet Again (1990) by Ramsey Lewis & Billy Taylor (Genre: Jazz):

Pianist Ramsey Lewis and vocalist Billy Taylor collaborated on this cool album back in 1990.
Song List: I Guess I’m Just A Lucky So And So, Django, Cookin’ At The Continental, Somewhere Soon, We meet Again, Quiet Storm, Soul Sister, Waltz For Debbie and Nigerian Marketplace.

Myrtle and Rose: Songs by Clara and Robert Schumann (2019) by Kyle Stegall (Genre: Classical):

Vocalist Kyle Stegall and pianist Eric Zivian present songs composed by famous nineteenth century composers, and wife and husband, Clara and Robert Schumann.

This collection contains twenty-six songs including: I. In der Fremde, II. Intermezzo, III. Waldesgespräch, IV. Die Stille, V. Mondnacht, VI. Schöne Fremde, VII. Auf einer Burg , VII. In der Fremde, IX. Wehmut, X. Zwielicht, XI. Im Walde, XII. Frühlingsnacht all composed by Robert Schuman; and Ich stand in dunklen Träumen, Op. 13, No. 1, Lorelei, Mein Stern, Liebst du um Schönheit and O Lust, o Lust, Op. 23, No. 6 all composed by Clara Schuman.

Videos of the Week:

Give A Little Whistle by The Dave Brubeck Quartet



When You Wish Upon A Star by The Dave Brubeck Quartet


56 Fury by Rodney Crowell


Flatland Hillbillies by Rodney Crowell


She’s A Bombshell From Brooklyn by Xavier Cugat & His Orchestra


Walter Winchell Rhumba by Xavier Cugat & His Orchestra


Four O’clock Blues by Memphis Slim


Pinetop’s Boogie Woogie by Memphis Slim


I Came For The Band by Lillie Mae


You’ve Got Other Girls For That by Lillie Mae


The Blues by Ramsey Lewis & Billy Taylor


I’m Just A Lucky So And So by Ramsey Lewis & Billy Taylor


Lorelei composed by Clara Schumann and performed by Kyle Stegall and Eric Zivian

Mien Stern composed by Clara Schumann and performed by Kyle Stegall and Eric Zivian

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Biographer at Events for Clara Schumann By Roberta Hershenson (May 19, 1996), The New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/1996/05/19/nyregion/biographer-at-events-for-clara-schumann.html

CLARA SCHUMANN AND HER PUPILS By Tim Page(April 26, 1987), The New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/1987/04/26/arts/clara-schumann-and-her-pupils.html

Dave Brubeck, Whose Distinctive Sound Gave Jazz New Pop, Dies at 91 By BEN RATLIFF (DEC. 5, 2012), The New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/arts/music/dave-brubeck-jazz-musician-dies-at-91.html

Xavier Cugat, 90, the Bandleader Who Rose on the Rumba’s Tide By John S. Wilson (Oct. 28, 1990), The New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/28/obituaries/xavier-cugat-90-the-bandleader-who-rose-on-the-rumba-s-tide.html

*Freegal is a free streaming music service available for free to library cardholders of all Southern Tier Library System member libraries. STLS member libraries include all the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler, and Allegany counties — including our own Southeast Steuben County Library.

You can download the Freegal music app to your mobile device or access the desktop version of the site by clicking on the following link:

*The Freegal service offers library card holders the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading August 12, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS

Correspondents by Tim Murphy:

“Murphy artfully connects multiple narratives to produce a sprawling tale of love, family, duty, war, and displacement. It is above all a stinging indictment of the ill-fated war in Iraq and the heavy tolls it continues to exact on its people.”—Khaled Hosseini, author of The Kite Runner
The world is Rita Khoury’s oyster. The bright and driven daughter of a Boston-area Irish-Arab family that has risen over the generations from poor immigrants to part of the coastal elite, Rita grows up in a 1980s cultural mishmash. Corned beef and cabbage sit on the dinner table alongside stuffed grape leaves and tabooleh, all cooked by Rita’s mother, an Irish nurse who met her Lebanese surgeon husband while working at a hospital together. The unconventional yet close-knit family bonds over summers at the beach, wedding line-dances, and a shared obsession with the Red Sox.

Rita charts herself an ambitious path through Harvard to one of the best newspapers in the country. She is posted in cosmopolitan Beirut and dates a handsome Palestinian would-be activist. But when she is assigned to cover the America-led invasion of Baghdad in 2003, she finds herself unprepared for the warzone. Her lifeline is her interpreter and fixer Nabil al-Jumaili, an equally restless young man whose dreams have been restricted by life in a deteriorating dictatorship, not to mention his own seemingly impossible desires. As the war tears Iraq apart, personal betrayal and the horrors of conflict force Rita and Nabil out of the country and into twisting, uncertain fates. What lies in wait will upend their lives forever, shattering their own notions of what they’re entitled to in a grossly unjust world.

Epic in scope, by turns satirical and heartbreaking, and speaking sharply to America’s current moment, Correspondents is a whirlwind story about displacement from one’s own roots, the violence America promotes both abroad and at home, and the resilience that allows families to remake themselves and endure even the most shocking upheavals.

Forgiving Waters by Kenneth L. Capps:

When the paths of an old cowboy and two young trespassers—-one black and one white—-cross, many lives are changed forever. Beauregard Lee Kelso grew up in a time of racial division and rampant prejudice. Now, at an age that is way past retirement, he struggles with decisions of his past that won’t allow him peace of mind. Kevin and Leonard are looking for some good fishing in one of the pasture watering holes when they cross onto Kelso’s land. This book is the winner of a 2012 Readers’ Favorite Honorable mention and a Gold (first place) Award in the 2013 Indie Next Generation Award for First Novel.

Out of the Dawn Light by Alys Clare:

“Clare’s captivating first in a new medieval series dramatizes the clash between the old pagan ways and Christianity in 11th-century England. In 1087, with the death of William the Conqueror, the common people are in a rebellious mood. Meanwhile, Lassair, a 14-year-old girl from a Fenland village with special gifts, is learning to be a healer. When two young men ask her to use her skills to locate a hidden treasure, she can’t refuse. Lassair joins the men on an arduous trek across East Anglia to the coast, where they unearth a 500-year-old solid gold relic. This relic, Lassair realizes, has the power to cause immense harm. Clare (The Joys of My Life and 11 other Hawkenlye mysteries) brings the people of the period to vivid life with close attention to such matters as food, clothes and religious belief. Engaging characters, like Lassair’s obnoxious sister and her storytelling grandmother, enhance a well-crafted plot that builds to a chilling climax.” Reed Business Review

Pond: A Novel by Claire-Louise Bennett:

Immediately upon its publication in Ireland, Claire-Louise Bennett’s debut began to attract attention well beyond the expectations of the tiny Irish press that published it. A deceptively slender volume, it captures with utterly mesmerizing virtuosity the interior reality of its unnamed protagonist, a young woman living a singular and mostly solitary existence on the outskirts of a small coastal village. Sidestepping the usual conventions of narrative, it focuses on the details of her daily experience—from the best way to eat porridge or bananas to an encounter with cows—rendered sometimes in story-length, story-like stretches of narrative, sometimes in fragments no longer than a page, but always suffused with the hypersaturated, almost synesthetic intensity of the physical world that we remember from childhood. The effect is of character refracted and ventriloquized by environment, catching as it bounces her longings, frustrations, and disappointments—the ending of an affair, or the ambivalent beginning with a new lover. As the narrator’s persona emerges in all its eccentricity, sometimes painfully and often hilariously, we cannot help but see mirrored there our own fraught desires and limitations, and our own fugitive desire, despite everything, to be known.

Shimmering and unusual, Pond demands to be devoured in a single sitting that will linger long after the last page.

River of Darkness by Rennie Airth:

So you thought British detectives had to focus on “the colonel in the drawing room with a candlestick” solutions? Newcomer Airth blasts that stereotype with this tale of serial murder set in post-World War I Britain, featuring the debut of Inspector John Madden, a veteran whose experiences in the trenches give him an edge in tracking and capturing the killer. Meanwhile, Dr. Helen Blackwell entices Madden to employ psychiatric theories shunned at the time by Scotland Yard to explain and predict the killer’s behavior. Airth develops a situation that presages today’s much-touted psychological profiling and serves to build an almost excruciatingly suspenseful plot. In addition, his deft handling of the emotional aftereffects of war gives the work an added sense of purpose. Fans of Thomas Harris will enjoy this book and can take heart in knowing that another Madden tale is already in the works. Nancy McNicol, Hagaman Memorial Lib., East Haven, CT, Library Journal Review.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

Beijing Payback: A Novel by Daniel Nieh:

“Propulsive. . . . Highly enjoyable. . . . It sets up a sequel, one that I very much look forward to reading.” —The New York Times Book Review

A fresh, smart, and fast-paced revenge thriller about a college basketball player who discovers shocking truths about his family in the wake of his father’s murder

Victor Li is devastated by his father’s murder, and shocked by a confessional letter he finds among his father’s things. In it, his father admits that he was never just a restaurateur—in fact he was part of a vast international crime syndicate that formed during China’s leanest communist years.

Victor travels to Beijing, where he navigates his father’s secret criminal life, confronting decades-old grudges, violent spats, and a shocking new enterprise that the organization wants to undertake. Standing up against it is likely what got his father killed, but Victor remains undeterred. He enlists his growing network of allies and friends to finish what his father started, no matter the costs.

Beyond Charlottesville: Taking a Stand Against White Nationalism by Terry McAuliffe with a forward by John Lewis:

The former governor of Virginia tells the behind-the-scenes story of the violent “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville―and shows how we can prevent other Charlottesvilles from happening.

When Governor Terry McAuliffe hung up the phone on the afternoon of the violent “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, he was sure Donald Trump would do the right thing as president: condemn the white supremacists who’d descended on the college town and who’d caused McAuliffe to declare a state of emergency that morning. He didn’t. Instead Trump declared there was “hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.” Trump was condemned from many sides himself, even by many Republicans, but the damage was done. He’d excused and thus egged on the terrorists at the moment when he could have stopped them in their tracks.

In Beyond Charlottesville, McAuliffe looks at the forces and events that led to the tragedy in Charlottesville, including the vicious murder of Heather Heyer and the death of two state troopers in a helicopter accident. He doesn’t whitewash Virginia history and discusses a KKK protest over the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee. He takes a hard real-time behind-the-scenes look at the actions of everyone on that fateful August 12, including himself, to see what could have been done. He lays out what was done afterwards to prevent future Charlottesvilles―and what still needs to be done as America in general and Virginia in particular continue to grapple with their history of racism.

Beyond Charlottesville will be the definitive account of an infamous chapter in our history, seared indelibly into memory, sure to be cited for years as a crucial reference point in the long struggle to fight racism, extremism and hate.

Border Son by Samuel Parker

It’s been years since Edward Kazmierski has seen his wayward son. In fact, it’s been years since he has allowed thoughts of Tyler to even enter his mind. The last place he knew Tyler to be was in an El Paso jail six years ago. Then, in one day, he receives a cryptic phone call telling him that his son needs him in Mexico, another from a federal agent searching for Tyler, and a visit from two men he hopes to never meet again.

South of the border, the chain of events set into motion by an impulsive act will almost certainly lead to death–for Tyler and for those who try to help him. But before Ed can recover his son, he will have to tear down the wall that has been built up between them.

With insight and artistry, Samuel Parker brings the dusty and dangerous streets of a Mexican border town into sharp focus in this suspenseful reimagining of the Prodigal Son story.

The Liberation of Paris: How Eisenhower, De Gaulle, and Von Choltitz Saved the City of Light by Jean Edward Smith:

Prize-winning and bestselling historian Jean Edward Smith tells the dramatic story of the liberation of Paris during World War II—a triumph that was achieved through the remarkable efforts of Americans, French, and Germans, all racing to save the city from destruction.

Following their breakout from Normandy in late June 1944, the Allies swept across northern France in pursuit of the German army. The Allies intended to bypass Paris and cross the Rhine into Germany, ending the war before winter set in. But as they advanced, local forces in Paris began their own liberation, defying the occupying German troops.

Charles de Gaulle, the leading figure of the Free French government, urged General Dwight Eisenhower to divert forces to liberate Paris. Eisenhower’s most senior staff recommended otherwise, but Ike wanted to help position de Gaulle to lead France after the war. And both men were concerned about partisan conflict in Paris that could leave the communists in control of the city and the national government, perhaps even causing a bloodbath like the Paris Commune. Neither man knew that the German commandant, Dietrich von Choltitz, convinced that the war was lost, dissembled and schemed to surrender the city to the Allies intact, defying Hitler’s orders to leave it a burning ruin.

In The Liberation of Paris, Jean Edward Smith puts this dramatic event in context, showing how the decision to free the city came at a heavy price: it slowed the Allied momentum and allowed the Germans to regroup. After the war German generals argued that Eisenhower’s decision to enter Paris prolonged the war for another six months. Was Paris worth this price? Smith answers this question in his superb, dramatic history of one of the great events of World War II—published seventy-five years after the liberation.

Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor:

Set in the 1950s against the backdrop of Grace Kelly’s whirlwind romance and unforgettable wedding to Prince Rainier of Monaco, New York Times bestselling author Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb take the reader on an evocative sun-drenched journey along the Côte d’Azur in this page-turning novel of passion, fate and second chances…

Movie stars and paparazzi flock to Cannes for the glamorous film festival, but Grace Kelly, the biggest star of all, wants only to escape from the flash-bulbs. When struggling perfumer Sophie Duval shelters Miss Kelly in her boutique to fend off a persistent British press photographer, James Henderson, a bond is forged between the two women and sets in motion a chain of events that stretches across thirty years of friendship, love, and tragedy.

James Henderson cannot forget his brief encounter with Sophie Duval. Despite his guilt at being away from his daughter, he takes an assignment to cover the wedding of the century, sailing with Grace Kelly’s wedding party on the SS Constitution from New York. In Monaco, as wedding fever soars and passions and tempers escalate, James and Sophie—like Princess Grace—must ultimately decide what they are prepared to give up for love.

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Book descriptions are provided by the publishers unless otherwise specified.

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Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial-free music each day:

RBDigital

*Magazines are available for free and on demand! You can check out magazines and read them on your computer or download the RBDigital app from your app store and read them on your mobile devices.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or RB Digital app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers August 18, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that ends August 18, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:


ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein:

An insightful Lab-terrier mix helps his owner, a struggling race car driver.

ASK AGAIN, YES by Mary Beth Keane:

The lives of neighboring families in a New York City suburb intertwine over four decades.

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

CHANCES ARE …by Richard Russo:

Three men in their 60s who met in college reunite on Martha’s Vineyard, where mysterious events occurred in 1971.

CITY OF GIRLS by Elizabeth Gilbert:

An 89-year-old Vivian Morris looks back at the direction her life took when she entered the 1940s New York theater scene.

DARK AGE by Pierce Brown:

The fifth book in the Red Rising series.

LABYRINTH by Catherine Coulter:

The 23rd book in the F.B.I. Thriller series. Agents Savich and Sherlock wend their way through a maze of lies to get to the bottom of a secret.

LADY IN THE LAKE by Laura Lippman:

In 1966, a housewife becomes a reporter and investigates the killing of a black woman in Baltimore.

LAST HOUSE GUEST by Megan Miranda:

Avery Greer must fight the clock to clear her name and uncover her friend’s real killer.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

NEW GIRL by Daniel Silva:

Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter is kidnapped.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci:

A World War II veteran on parole must find the real killer in a small town or face going back to jail.

THE RECKONING by John Grisham:

A decorated World War II veteran shoots and kills a pastor inside a Mississippi church.

SMOKESCREEN by Iris Johansen:

The 25th book in the Eve Duncan series. A forensic sculptor faces dangers when she looks into an attack of African villagers by guerilla soldiers.

SOMEONE WE KNOW by Shari Lapena:

In a quiet suburb, a teenager has been breaking into homes and hacking into computers, while a woman is found murdered.

SUMMER OF ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand:

The Levin family undergoes dramatic events with a son in Vietnam, a daughter in protests and dark secrets hiding beneath the surface.

UNDER CURRENTS by Nora Roberts:

Echoes of a violent childhood reverberate for Zane Bigelow when he starts a new kind of family in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

WILLING TO DIE by Lisa Jackson:

The eighth book in the Alvarez & Pescoli series. A doctor and his wife are found dead in separate beds.

WINDOW ON THE BAY by Debbie Macomber:

A single mom’s life takes unexpected turns when her two children go off to college.

NON-FICTION:.

AMERICAN CARNAGE by Tim Alberta:

Politico Magazine’s chief political correspondent narrates a decade-long civil war inside the GOP and Donald Trump’s concurrent ascension.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates:

A meditation on race in America.

BEYOND CHARLOTTESVILLE by Terry McAuliffe:

The former governor of Virginia describes the forces and events behind the “Unite the Right” rally and suggests ways to prevent similar occurrences in the future.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

JUSTICE ON TRIAL by Mollie Hemingway and Carrie Severino:

The conservative authors give their take on the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

A civil rights lawyer and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates:

The philanthropist shares stories of empowering women to improve society.

THE MUELLER REPORT with related materials by The Washington Post: 

Redacted findings from the special counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential obstruction of justice by the president.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

THE RANGE by David Epstein:

An argument for how generalists excel more than specialists, especially in complex and unpredictable fields.

SECOND MOUNTAIN by David Brooks:

A New York Times Op-Ed columnist espouses having an outward focus to attain a meaningful life.

SIGNS by Laura Lynne Jackson:

A medium details potential ways the deceased may speak to us through everyday events.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening August 9, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our lucky seven musical streaming* suggestions for the week.

Ann Arbor Blues Festival 1969, Volumes 1 & 2 (2019) by Various Artists (Genre: Blues):

“Considering how important the blues were to the growth of American music, it’s little short of amazing that they flew under the radar of mainstream recognition in their native form for most of the 20th century. Until major country blues artists of the ’20s and ’30s were rediscovered by collectors in the early ’60s, most of them had scarcely been heard outside the Deep South. Modern electric performers fared well on the so-called “Chitlin’ Circuit” of venues in African-American communities, but it wasn’t until late in the decade, after being lionized by British stars, that they had visibility among mainstream listeners. With this in mind, it’s only so surprising that the 1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival, held on the campus of the University of Michigan, was one of the first times a significant number of major blues artists were booked to play on the same bill, appearing before an audience dominated by young white listeners. The organizers chose their performers wisely, and the stellar lineup included giants of electric blues (Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Howlin’ Wolf), legendary country blues performers (Son House, Mississippi John Hurt), outstanding modern acts (Luther Allison, Magic Sam), venerable elder statespeople (Big Joe Williams, Big Mama Thornton, Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup), and even some notable outliers (Clifton Chenier, appearing at a time when zydeco was little known among Midwestern blues fans).

Considering the importance of the event, it’s a shame that no one had the presence of mind to have professionals record the performances, but thankfully amateurs stepped in, and one of the fans who helped stage the festival brought along a tape recorder and documented most of the artists. These tapes went unheard outside a small circle of fans for nearly 50 years, but Third Man Records has belatedly compiled the highlights into a two-volume set, Ann Arbor Blues Festival 1969.” – Mark Deming, AllMusic Review

Songs include So Glad You’re Mine, Everybody Must Suffer, Help Me, Hard Luck, Long Distance Call & Call It Stormy Monday.

Country Squire (2019) by Tyler Childers (Genre: Country):

“When it comes to Tyler Childers, it’s tempting to read too much into album titles. Purgatory, his 2017 debut, did tend to hang suspended between the poles separating country and Americana, having its roots inflections feel spectral. Country Squire, on the other hand, is as sharp and stately as its title suggests. Working once again with producer Sturgill Simpson, Childers leans into the lean, twangy aspects of his sound without quite abandoning his cinematic ambition. Witness how the songs segue together, for instance: as the lazy shuffle “Gemini” fades to completion, the haunting roll of “House Fire” comes into focus. It’s a subtle trick, yet it’s one that subtly binds together Country Squire, giving it the illusion of a song cycle. A connective narrative may be elusive to find on Country Squire, but Childers is a sly storyteller, a gift that threatens to be overshadowed by the robust realization of his songs. Unlike Purgatory, there isn’t a spare moment to be found on Country Squire; even its slowest, saddest songs, such as the closing plea “Matthew,” feel vivid and complete. Considering how the album moves as swiftly as an EP, this richness feels like an achievement: with nine short songs, Tyler Childers has deepened and expanded the world he etched in Purgatory.” Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AllMusic Review

Song List: Country Squire, Bus Route, Creeker, Gemini, House Fire, Ever Lovin’ Hand, Peace of Mind, All Your’n and Matthew.

Finch (2019) by Penny and Sparrow (Folk, Pop/Rock):

“Texas-raised duo Penny & Sparrow had to do some heavy touring to truly search their souls. They explore the resulting range of emotions and deliver it on their sixth album “Finch,” an effort thick with gorgeous tales of personal transformation.

Band members Andy Baxter and Kyle Jahnke were both raised in a conservative climate and sought to break free from the “white Evangelical Christian male” perspective that shaped their early surroundings, the band explains in liner notes.

Sonically, there is a smooth and soaring feel to most of the tracks, yet each has its own distinct energy. “Recuerda” is love song heavy on crooning, while “Don’t Wanna Be Without Ya” gives way to a galloping pace as the concept of reincarnated lovers is explored. “Long Gone” is sexy and sultry and highlights the fact that Baxter can absolutely sing a slow jam.

Ultimately, rich and breathy vocals with a slight choral effect carry the day here. There’s a dependable luster to Penny & Sparrow’s songs. Songs begin dour, but eventually find their footing and reveal hope amid bass lines and light guitar.

Think of this as Americana with a designer shirt. The traditional elements are there, but they’re layered with a modern sheen that sets the songs apart from a tired approach.” ABC News Review.

Song List: Long Gone, Eloise Preamble, Eloise, Don’t Wanna Be Without You, Cult Classically, Bishop, Recuerda, Hannah, Stockholm, It’s Hysterical and Gumshoe.

It Came From 1999 Playlist by Various Artists:

This 84 song playlist features a great mix of popular songs from 1999. Music of that era is not my vintage; however, one of my co-workers assures me that if you were listening to the radio in 1999 and loving the music you heard – than you will like this playlist!

So let’s time travel over the airwaves back to 1999 and listen to Mariah Carey, Ricky Martin, Macy Gray, Creed, Silverchair, Fiona Apple, Destiny’s Child, Blaque and more as we pretend we’re back in 1999!

Parlour Game (2019) by Jenny Scheinman & Allison Miller (Genre: Jazz):

“In jazz, some bands just happen. One relationship leads to another. Circumstances make for changed personnel. Then, shared moments occur onstage—an exalted passage of music, or just a feeling, that begs for more. Such is the case with Parlour Game, the new quartet led by violinist Jenny Scheinman and drummer Allison Miller.

The ensemble is most clearly an outgrowth of Boom Tic Boom, the sextet with which, during the past decade, Ms. Miller has established a sound that is at once free-wheeling and sturdy, and grounded in a trap-set technique that has made her among New York’s sought-after jazz drummers. That group deepened the bond Ms. Miller and Ms. Scheinman first formed 20 years ago, while working in New York’s downtown scene. Two years ago, when Boom Tic Boom’s pianist, Myra Melford, and bassist, Todd Sickafoose, were unavailable for a tour, Ms. Miller invited a frequent collaborator of hers, pianist Carmen Staaf, into the fold. Ms. Scheinman suggested bassist Tony Scherr, whom she knew from guitarist Bill Frisell’s bands.

Right away, things clicked. “I was in swinging heaven,” Ms. Miller said of playing with Mr. Scherr. “Sometimes a band grows from the rhythm section out,” Ms. Scheinman told me. “You just feel something irresistible. You want more.”

That sense of joyful attraction and shared hunger grounded in rhythmic acuity is nearly palpable on “Jenny Scheinman & Allison Miller’s Parlour Game” (Royal Potato Family), the quartet’s debut release. The album begins with the lighthearted and bouncy “Play Money” and ends with “Sleep Rider,” a spacious and meditative piece. In between, the group digs into several grooves: rolling Afrobeats on “116th & Congress”; stride rhythms on “Beans & Rice”; hints of hip-hop within the blues-tinged “Fake Weather”; and a funky groove, drawn from Washington, D.C.’s “go-go” sound, on “Miss Battle’s Cannonball.” Each track swings in its own way yet with a consistent sense of commitment, embodying what musicians call “the pocket”: a rhythmic feel that is firmly locked in but also relaxed to the point of elasticity.” — Larry Blumenfeld,The Wall Street Journal

Song List: Play Money, 116th & Congress, The Right Fit, Michigan, Fake Weather, Lead With Love, Beans & Rice, Meanwhile, Top Shelf, Miss Battle’s Cannonball and Sleep Rider,

Sommernachtskonzert 2019 / Summer Night Concert 2019 Gustavo Dudamel & Wiener Philharmoniker (Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra) (Genre: Classical, Band):

This is the companion album to the video broadcast of the Summer Night Concert being shown as part of PBS’s Great Performances series on Friday, August 9.

Here’s a synopsis of the concert from the PBS site: “Famed conductor and music and artistic director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Gustavo Dudamel returns to the gardens of Schönbrunn Palace with the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra for Great Performances: Vienna Philharmonic Summer Night Concert 2019, premiering Friday, August 9 at 9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings), pbs.org/gperf and the PBS Video app. The program features popular selections from both European and American composers and is dedicated to the musical connection between continents: the old world of Europe and the new world of America.

The program includes Leonard Bernstein’s overture to “Candide” and American classics such as John Philipp Sousa’s “The Stars and Stripes Forever.” Renowned pianist Yuja Wang joins the orchestra for George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue,” and performs Chopin’s Waltz in C Sharp Minor, op. 64 #2 for an encore.

This year marks Dudamel’s second time conducting the annual concert special, having led the orchestra in 2012. Past conductors include Bobby McFerrin (2004), Zubin Mehta (2005 and 2015), Plácido Domingo (2006), Valery Gergiev (2007, 2011 and 2018), Georges Prêtre (2008), Daniel Barenboim (2009), Franz Welser-Möst (2010), Lorin Maazel (2013), Christoph Eschenbach (2014 and 2017) and Semyon Bychkov (2016). The free outdoor concert is broadcast to more than 80 countries worldwide.

Music Selections and Composers:

Overture to “Candide” – Leonard Bernstein
“Rhapsody in Blue” – George Gershwin
Waltz in C sharp minor, op.64 #2 – Frédéric Chopin
“Casablanca Suite” – Max Steiner
“The Stars and Stripes Forever” – John Philipp Sousa
Adagio for Strings – Samuel Barber
“The Star-Spangled Banner March,” op. 460 – Carl Michael Ziehrer
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, op. 95 “From the New World,” 4th movement, allegro con fuoco – Antonín Dvořák

Encores:

“Hoe-Down” from “Rodeo” – Aaron Copland
“Viennese Spirit” waltz – Johann Strauss (Jr.)

Notable Talent:

Gustavo Dudamel, conductor, internationally renowned music and artistic director and conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Yuja Wang, critically acclaimed Beijing-born pianist featured as an artist-in-residence at three world-famous venues: Carnegie Hall, the Wiener Konzerthaus, and the Luxembourg Philharmonie; named Musical America’s Artist of the Year in 2017.” – PBS

John Williams Plays Bach: The Complete Lute Music on Guitar by John Williams (1975/1986) by John Williams:

The great classical guitarist John Williams, not to be confused with the equally great stage and screen composer John Williams (Star Wars, E.T., Jaws, Saving Private Ryan etc.), offers the complete music J.S. Bach wrote for lute – all four lute suites: Suite for Lute in E minor, BWV 996, Partita for Lute in C Minor, MWV 997, Partita for Lute in E major, BWV 100a and Suite for Lute in G minor, BWV 995.

Videos of the Week:

Call It Stormy Monday by T-Bone Walker & Various Artists

Hard Luck by Howlin’ Wolf & His Orchestra

So Glad You’re Mine by Arthur “Big Boy, Crudup & Various Artists

All Your’n by Tyler Childers

House Fire by Tyler Childers

Don’t Wanna Be Without Ya by Penny and Sparrow

Eliose by Penny and Sparrow

To Your Love by Fiona Apple

Large Than Life by Backstreet Boys

Superman vs. Lloyd by Kissing Book

Michigan by Jenny Scheinman & Allison Miller

Parlour Game by Jenny Scheinman & Allison Miller

Candide: Overture by Gustavo Dudamel an the Wiener Philharmoniker (Summer Night Concert 2019)

Sousa: Stars and Stripes Forever (Summer Night Concert 2019) by Vienna Philharmonic

Teaser trailer for the Summer Night Concert 2019 which will be shown on PBS on Friday, August 9, 2019

Lute Suite No. 1 composed by J.S Back and performed by John Williams

Prelude from Lute Suite 4, BWV – 1006 composed by J.S. Bach & performed by John Williams

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Bach: The Four Lute Suites / John Williams
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=139564

Great Performances: Vienna Philharmonic Summer Night Concert 2019: About:
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/great-performances-vienna-philharmonic-summer-night-concert-2019-about/9786/

Music Review: ‘Finch’ from Penny & Sparrow is a gem from ABC News
https://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory/music-review-finch-penny-sparrow-gem-64742994

Music Review ‘Jenny Scheinman & Allison Miller’s Parlour Game’ Review: A Joyful Collaboration by Larry Blumenfeld for The Wall Street Journal
https://www.wsj.com/articles/jenny-scheinman-allison-millers-parlour-game-review-a-joyful-collaboration-11565019651

*Freegal is a free streaming music service available for free to library cardholders of all Southern Tier Library System member libraries. STLS member libraries include all the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler, and Allegany counties — including our own Southeast Steuben County Library.

You can download the Freegal music app to your mobile device or access the desktop version of the site by clicking on the following link:

*The Freegal service offers library card holders the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.