Suggested Listening October 19, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations for the week; four streaming suggestions* and one recommended album on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

May Your Kindness Remain (2018) by Courtney Marie Andrews (Genre: Singer-Songwriter/Folk, Country, Pop, Rock):

Phoenix native Courtney Marie Andrews is an indie singer-songwriter with a strong clear singing voice. She is known for writing and playing in a variety of styles, May Your Kindness Remain is her new album.

Songs on the LP include: May Your Kindness Remain, Life the Lonely from My Heart, Rough Around the Edges and Two Cold Nights in Buffalo.

With Me Little Ukulele in Me Hand (2018) by Diz Disley (Genre: Folk, Comedy, Jazz):

William “Diz” Disley was a Anglo-Canadian guitarist and ukulele player whose humorous ukulele songs have a sort of early twentieth century Dixieland sound and will bring a smile to your face.

Songs in this collection include: Little Ukulele, On the Wigan Boat Express, If You Want To Get Your Photo in the Press, Sitting On Top Of Blackpool Tower and When I’m Cleaning Windows.

Everything I Could Never Say (2018) by lovelytheband (Genre: Modern Pop, Rock with a touch of dance music mixed in):

lovelytheband is a Los Angeles based indie pop-rock band consisting of singer & songwriter Mitchy Collins, guitarist Jordan Greenwald and drummer Sam Price. Everything I Could Never Say is their new album.

Songs in the set include: broken, emotion, don’t worry, stupid mistakes, everything I could never say and pity party. (And just FYI for the grammar detectives out there – yes, the song titles on the album really are typed all in lower case letters…)

Forgotten But Not Gone (2009) by Various Artists:

Originally released in 2009, sales from this album originally went toward rebuilding New Orleans and the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The album features a great collection of songs by mostly vintage musicians including Bonnie Bramlett, Buddy & Julie Miller, Steve Earle, Chris Knight, Moses Crow and Lee Roy Parnell.

Songs on the album include: Last Night I Dreamed of New Orleans by Bonnie Bramlett, Indianola by Steve Azar, Steve’s Hammer by Steve Earle, Brighter Day by Jon Justice, Mardi Gras by Bruce Buscoyo Belliott and Hard Times in the Big easy by Wood Newton.

Recommended CD of the Week:

Halloween Stomp (1990) by Various Artists (Genre: Swing, Jazz, Vocal, Humor):

This collection of “spooky” performances is dominated by songs dealing with ghosts and monsters, everything from “Mysterious Mose” and “Got the Jitters” to “Zombie,” “Skeleton in the Closet,” “The Ghost of Smokey Joe” and “With Her Head Tucked Underneath Her Arm.” Most of the music is from the swing era with such bands as those led by Red Nichols, Don Redman, Glen Gray, Louis Prima, Ozzie Nelson, Cab Calloway, Tommy Dorsey and even Rudy Vallee alternating with much more obscure groups. The producers at Jass have also “enhanced” the music by inserting odd sound effects between songs. This CD certainly qualifies as the definitive (and also only) Halloween jazz album. – Scott Yanow, AllMusic Review.

Videos of the Week:

Two Cold Nights In Buffalo by Courtney Marie Andrews

Little Ukulele by Diz Disley

It Had To Be You by The Diz Disley Trio

Broken by lovelytheband

Steve’s Hammer (for Pete) by Steve Earle:

(This is a live performance and be aware, Steve’s intro is a bit salty! Also, if you wish to skip the intro – go to 4:43)

Skeletons in the Closet by Louis Armstrong: 

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Perfect Autumn Reading Titles

This time of year always seems to me to be a special one brimming with possibilities. The days are crisp and clean and seem to imply adventure might pop out from behind any corner.

And here is a reading list to complement this special season!

These books run the gamut from being perfect for reading on a wild, windy fall evening, a clear and bright Sunday morning or on a quiet evening when you can just imagine something unexplained going bump in the night!

Collected Poems, Prose, and Plays by Robert Frost:

Justly celebrated at home and abroad, Robert Frost is perhaps America’s greatest twentieth-century poet and a towering figure in American letters. From the publication of his first collections, A Boy’s Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914), Frost was recognized as a poet of unique power and formal skill, and the enduring significance of his work has been acknowledged by each subsequent generation. His poetry ranges from deceptively simply pastoral lyrics and genial, vernacular genre pieces to darker meditations, complex and ironic.

Here, based on extensive research into his manuscripts and published work, is the first authoritative and truly comprehensive collection of his writings. Brought together for the first time in a Library of America single volume is all the major poetry, a generous selection of uncollected poems, all of Frost’s dramatic writing, and the most extensive gathering of his prose writings ever published, several of which are printed here for the first time.

The core of this collection is the 1949 Complete Poems of Robert Frost, the last collection supervised by Frost himself. This version of the poems is free of unauthorized editorial changes introduced into subsequent editions. Also included is In the Clearing (1962), Frost’s final volume of poetry. Verse drawn from letters, articles, pamphlets, and journals makes up the largest selection of uncollected poems ever assembled, including nearly two dozen beautiful early works printed for the first time. Also gathered here are all the dramatic works: three plays and two verse masques.

The unprecedented prose section includes more than three times as many items as any other collection available. It is rich and diverse, presenting many newly discovered or rediscovered pieces. Especially unusual items include Frost’s contribution to John F. Kennedy’s inauguration and two fascinating 1959 essays on “The Future of Man.” Several manuscript items are published here for the first time, including the essays “‘Caveat Poeta’” and “The Way There,” Frost’s remarks on being appointed poetry consultant to the Library of Congress in 1958, the preface to a proposed new edition of North of Boston, and many others. A selection of letters represents all of Frost’s important comments about prosody, poetics, style, and his theory of “sentence sounds.”

Fever Dream: A Novel by Samanta Schweblin:

“A taut, exquisite page-turner vibrating with existential distress and cumulative dread…. While the book resides in the realm of the uncanny, its concerns are all too real. Once the top blows off Schweblin’s chest of horrors, into which we’d been peeking through a masterfully manipulated crack, what remains is an unsettling and significant dissection of maternal love and fear, of the devastation we’ve left to the future, and of our inability to escape or control the unseen and unimagined threats all around us. In a literary thriller of the highest order, Schweblin teases out the underlying anxieties of being vulnerable and loving vulnerable creatures and of being an inhabitant of a planet with an increasingly uncertain future.” —Kirkus, STARRED review

Harry Potter And The Sorcerer’s Stone written by J. K. Rowling & Illustrated by Jim Kay:

The beloved first book of the Harry Potter series, now fully illustrated by award-winning artist Jim Kay.

For the first time, J.K. Rowling’s beloved Harry Potter books will be presented in lavishly illustrated full-color editions. Kate Greenaway-award-winning artist Jim Kay has created over 100 stunning illustrations, making this deluxe format a perfect gift as much for a child being introduced to the series, as for the dedicated fan.

Harry Potter has never been the star of a Quidditch team, scoring points while riding a broom far above the ground. He knows no spells, has never helped to hatch a dragon, and has never worn a cloak of invisibility.

All he knows is a miserable life with the Dursleys, his horrible aunt and uncle, and their abominable son, Dudley — a great big swollen spoiled bully. Harry’s room is a tiny closet at the foot of the stairs, and he hasn’t had a birthday party in eleven years.

But all that is about to change when a mysterious letter arrives by owl messenger: a letter with an invitation to an incredible place that Harry — and anyone who reads about him — will find unforgettable.

The Hobbit, Or There And Back Again written by J. R. R. Tolkien & Illustrated by Alan Lee:

This lavish gift edition of J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic features cover art, illustrations, and watercolor paintings by the artist Alan Lee.

Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum.
Written for J.R.R. Tolkien’s own children, The Hobbit has sold many millions of copies worldwide and established itself as a modern classic.

The Hound of the Baskervilles written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle & Illustrated by Pam Smy:

The legend of the hound which has brought terror to the Baskerville family for generations brings Sherlock Holmes up against a formidable adversary and sends Dr Watson to a bleak and lonely moor where it is all too easy to believe that something not of this world is intent on driving his friend to a foul and hideous death…”As you value your life or your reason keep away from the moor” read the note Sir Henry Baskerville had received. But the baronet, disbelieving legendary tales of a hound from hell which had torn out the throat of his evil ancestor, was intent on taking up his inheritance. Sherlock Holmes, brought into the case because the death of Sir Henry’s uncle, insists that the trusty, level-headed Dr Watson go as guard to Baskerville Hall…

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco:

Umberto Eco’s first novel, an international sensation and winner of the Premio Strega and the Prix Médicis Étranger awards

The year is 1327. Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate. When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective. His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon—all sharpened to a glistening edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity. He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where “the most interesting things happen at night.”

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern:

Two starcrossed magicians engage in a deadly game of cunning in The Night Circus,the spellbinding bestseller that has captured the world’s imagination.

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.

Night in the Lonesome October by Roger Zelazny:

Loyally accompanying a mysterious knife-wielding gentleman named Jack on his midnight rounds through the murky streets of London, good dog Snuff is busy helping his master collect the grisly ingredients needed for an unearthly rite that will take place not long after the death of the moon. But Snuff and his master are not alone. All manner of participants, both human and not, are gathering with their ancient tools and their animal familiars in preparation for the dread night. It is brave, devoted Snuff who must calculate the patterns of the Game and keep track of the Players—the witch, the mad monk, the vengeful vicar, the Count who sleeps by day, the Good Doctor and the hulking Experiment Man he fashioned from human body parts, and a wild-card American named Larry Talbot—all the while keeping Things at bay and staying a leap ahead of the Great Detective, who knows quite a bit more than he lets on.

Boldly original and wildly entertaining, A Night in the Lonesome October is a darkly sparkling gem, an amalgam of horror, humor, mystery, and fantasy. First published in 1993, it was Zelazny’s last book prior to his untimely death. Many consider it the best of the fantasy master’s novels. It has inspired many fans to read it every year in October, a chapter a day, and served as inspiration for Neil Gaiman’s brilliant story “Only the End of the World Again.”

Persuasion by Jane Austen:

In her final novel, as in her earlier ones, Jane Austen uses a love story to explore and gently satirize social pretensions and emotional confusion. Persuasion follows the romance of Anne Elliot and naval officer Frederick Wentworth. They were happily engaged until Anne’s friend, Lady Russell, persuaded her that Frederick was “unworthy.” Now, eight years later, Frederick returns, a wealthy captain in the navy, while Anne’s family teeters on the edge of bankruptcy. They still love each other, but their past mistakes threaten to keep them apart.
Austen may seem to paint on a small canvas, but her characters contain the full range of human passion and moral complexity, and the author’s generous spirit renders them all with understanding, compassion, and humor.

The Secret History by Donna Tartt:

Donna Tartt, winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for her most recent novel, The Goldfinch, established herself as a major talent with The Secret History, which has become a contemporary classic.

Under the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality their lives are changed profoundly and forever, and they discover how hard it can be to truly live and how easy it is to kill.

A Separate Peace by John Knowles:

Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read.

Set at a boys’ boarding school in New England during the early years of World War II, A Separate Peace is a harrowing and luminous parable of the dark side of adolescence. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world.

Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray:

One of Ray Bradbury’s best-known and most popular novels, Something Wicked This Way Comes, now featuring a new introduction and material about its longstanding influence on culture and genre.

For those who still dream and remember, for those yet to experience the hypnotic power of its dark poetry, step inside. The show is about to begin. Cooger & Dark’s Pandemonium Shadow Show has come to Green Town, Illinois, to destroy every life touched by its strange and sinister mystery. The carnival rolls in sometime after midnight, ushering in Halloween a week early. A calliope’s shrill siren song beckons to all with a seductive promise of dreams and youth regained. Two boys will discover the secret of its smoke, mazes, and mirrors; two friends who will soon know all too well the heavy cost of wishes…and the stuff of nightmares.

Few novels have endured in the heart and memory as has Ray Bradbury’s unparalleled literary masterpiece Something Wicked This Way Comes. Scary and suspenseful, it is a timeless classic in the American canon.

Washington Irving’s Tales of the Supernatural written by Washington Irving and illustrated by R. W. Alley:

In this book of Irving’s choicest stories of the supernatural, there are ghosts in large numbers, as well as goblins, apparitions, spectres, reincarnations, necromancers, and more than a few probable figments of the imagination. This book is filled with fun stories perfect for those crisp, clean days of autumn – including The Legend of Sleepy Hallow!

The Yonahlossee Riding Camp For Girls by Anton DiSclafani:

“This summer’s first romantic page turner.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
Named a most anticipated book for Summer 2013 by The Wall Street Journaland Publishers Weekly and USA Today, NPR, and People summer reads pick

From the author of The After Party, a lush, sexy, evocative debut novel of family secrets and girls’-school rituals, set in the 1930s South.

It is 1930, the midst of the Great Depression. After her mysterious role in a family tragedy, passionate, strong-willed Thea Atwell, age fifteen, has been cast out of her Florida home, exiled to an equestrienne boarding school for Southern debutantes. High in the Blue Ridge Mountains, with its complex social strata ordered by money, beauty, and girls’ friendships, the Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a far remove from the free-roaming, dreamlike childhood Thea shared with her twin brother on their family’s citrus farm—a world now partially shattered. As Thea grapples with her responsibility for the events of the past year that led her here, she finds herself enmeshed in a new order, one that will change her sense of what is possible for herself, her family, her country.

Weaving provocatively between home and school, the narrative powerfully unfurls the true story behind Thea’s expulsion from her family, but it isn’t long before the mystery of her past is rivaled by the question of how it will shape her future. Part scandalous love story, part heartbreaking family drama, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is an immersive, transporting page-turner—a vivid, propulsive novel about sex, love, family, money, class, home, and horses, all set against the ominous threat of the Depression—and the major debut of an important new writer.

Sources Cited:

Wilson, Kristian. 15 Books To Read During The Fall Because They Prefectly Capture The Autumnal Spirit. September 5, 2017. Online. Accessed October 17, 2018. https://www.bustle.com/p/15-books-to-read-during-the-fall-because-they-perfectly-capture-the-autumnal-spirit-80312

Best Books To Read In Autumn: A list of books that are enhanced by the atmosphere of Autumn. goodreads. Online. Accessed October 17, 2018 https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/155.Best_Books_To_Read_In_Autumn

Suggested Reading October 15, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

(Note: Click on the photo of the item you’d like to request or check out)

Digital Suggestions Of The Week:

Difficult Women by Roxane Gay:

Award-winning author and powerhouse talent Roxane Gay burst onto the scene with An Untamed State and the New York Times bestselling essay collection Bad Feminist (Harper Perennial). Gay returns with Difficult Women, a collection of stories of rare force and beauty, of hardscrabble lives, passionate loves, and quirky and vexed human connection.

The women in these stories live lives of privilege and of poverty, are in marriages both loving and haunted by past crimes or emotional blackmail. A pair of sisters, grown now, have been inseparable ever since they were abducted together as children, and must negotiate the elder sister’s marriage. A woman married to a twin pretends not to realize when her husband and his brother impersonate each other. A stripper putting herself through college fends off the advances of an overzealous customer. A black engineer moves to Upper Michigan for a job and faces the malign curiosity of her colleagues and the difficulty of leaving her past behind. From a girls’ fight club to a wealthy subdivision in Florida where neighbors conform, compete, and spy on each other, Gay delivers a wry, beautiful, haunting vision of modern America reminiscent of Merritt Tierce, Jamie Quatro, and Miranda July.

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson:

The classic supernatural thriller by an author who helped define the genre

First published in 1959, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House has been hailed as a perfect work of unnerving terror. It is the story of four seekers who arrive at a notoriously unfriendly pile called Hill House: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence of a “haunting”; Theodora, his lighthearted assistant; Eleanor, a friendless, fragile young woman well acquainted with poltergeists; and Luke, the future heir of Hill House. At first, their stay seems destined to be merely a spooky encounter with inexplicable phenomena. But Hill House is gathering its powers—and soon it will choose one of them to make its own.

Send Down the Rain by Charles Martin:

“Martin’s latest is another beautifully written winner. . . Amazingly heartfelt statements about love, loss and the true meaning of friendship will resonate deeply with readers.” —RT Book Reviews

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Mountain Between Us comes a new, spellbinding story of buried secrets, lost love, and the promise of second chances.

Allie is still recovering from the loss of her family’s beloved waterfront restaurant on Florida’s Gulf Coast when she loses her second husband to a terrifying highway accident. Devastated and losing hope, she shudders to contemplate the future—until a cherished person from her past returns.

Joseph has been adrift for many years, wounded in both body and spirit and unable to come to terms with the trauma of his Vietnam War experiences. Just as he resolves to abandon his search for peace and live alone at a remote cabin in the Carolina mountains, he discovers a mother and her two small children lost in the forest. A man of character and strength, he instinctively steps in to help them get back to their home in Florida. There he will return to his own hometown—and witness the accident that launches a bittersweet reunion with his childhood sweetheart, Allie.

When Joseph offers to help Allie rebuild her restaurant, it seems the flame may reignite—until a 45-year-old secret from the past begins to emerge, threatening to destroy all hope for their second chance at love.

In Send Down the Rain, Charles Martin proves himself to be a storyteller of great wisdom and compassion who bears witness to the dreams we cherish, the struggles we face, and the courage we must summon when life seems to threaten what we hold most dear.

Transcription: A Novel by Kate Atkinson:

A dramatic story of WWII espionage, betrayal, and loyalty, by the #1 bestselling author of Life After Life

In 1940, eighteen-year old Juliet Armstrong is reluctantly recruited into the world of espionage. Sent to an obscure department of MI5 tasked with monitoring the comings and goings of British Fascist sympathizers, she discovers the work to be by turns both tedious and terrifying. But after the war has ended, she presumes the events of those years have been relegated to the past forever.

Ten years later, now a radio producer at the BBC, Juliet is unexpectedly confronted by figures from her past. A different war is being fought now, on a different battleground, but Juliet finds herself once more under threat. A bill of reckoning is due, and she finally begins to realize that there is no action without consequence.

Transcription is a work of rare depth and texture, a bravura modern novel of extraordinary power, wit and empathy. It is a triumphant work of fiction from one of the best writers of our time.

The Wife: A Novel by Meg Wolitzer:

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Glenn Close

Meg Wolitzer brings her characteristic wit and intelligence to a provocative story about the evolution of a marriage, the nature of partnership, the question of a male or female sensibility, and the place for an ambitious woman in a man’s world.

The moment Joan Castleman decides to leave her husband, they are thirty-five thousand feet above the ocean on a flight to Helsinki. Joan’s husband, Joseph, is one of America’s preeminent novelists, about to receive a prestigious international award, and Joan, who has spent forty years subjugating her own literary talents to fan the flames of his career, has finally decided to stop. From this gripping opening, Meg Wolitzer flashes back to 1950s Smith College and Greenwich Village and follows the course of the marriage that has brought the couple to this breaking point—one that results in a shocking revelation.

With her skillful storytelling and pitch-perfect observations, Wolitzer has crafted a wise and candid look at the choices all men and women make—in marriage, work, and life.

Print Suggestions Of The Week:

Ask Me No Questions by Shelley Noble:

A modern woman in 1907, Lady Dunbridge is not about to let a little thing like the death of her husband ruin her social life. She’s ready to take the dazzling world of Gilded Age Manhattan by storm. From the decadence of high society balls to the underbelly of Belmont horse racing, romance, murder, and scandals abound. Someone simply must do something. And Lady Dunbridge is happy to oblige.

The Bartered Brides by Mercedes Lackey:

The thirteenth novel in the magical alternate history Elemental Masters series continues the reimagined adventures of Sherlock Holmes in a richly-detailed alternate Victorian England.

The threat of Moriarty is gone—but so is Sherlock Holmes.

Even as they mourn the loss of their colleague, psychic Nan Killian, medium Sarah Lyon-White, and Elemental Masters John and Mary Watson must be vigilant, for members of Moriarty’s network are still at large. And their troubles are far from over: in a matter of weeks, two headless bodies of young brides wash up in major waterways. A couple who fears for their own recently-wedded daughter hires the group to investigate, but with each new body, the mystery only deepens.

The more bodies emerge, the more the gang suspects that there is dangerous magic at work, and that Moriarty’s associates are somehow involved. But as they race against the clock to uncover the killer, it will take all their talents, Magic, and Psychic Powers—and perhaps some help from a dearly departed friend—to bring the murderer to justice.

Every Breath by Nicholas Sparks:

In the romantic tradition of The Notebook and Nights in Rodanthe, #1 New York Times bestselling author Nicholas Sparks returns with a story about a chance encounter that becomes a touchstone for two vastly different individuals — transcending decades, continents, and the bittersweet workings of fate.

Hope Anderson is at a crossroads. At thirty-six, she’s been dating her boyfriend, an orthopedic surgeon, for six years. With no wedding plans in sight, and her father recently diagnosed with ALS, she decides to use a week at her family’s cottage in Sunset Beach, North Carolina, to ready the house for sale and mull over some difficult decisions about her future.

Tru Walls has never visited North Carolina but is summoned to Sunset Beach by a letter from a man claiming to be his father. A safari guide, born and raised in Zimbabwe, Tru hopes to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding his mother’s early life and recapture memories lost with her death. When the two strangers cross paths, their connection is as electric as it is unfathomable . . . but in the immersive days that follow, their feelings for each other will give way to choices that pit family duty against personal happiness in devastating ways.

Illuminating life’s heartbreaking regrets and enduring hope, EVERY BREATH explores the many facets of love that lay claim to our deepest loyalties — and asks the question, How long can a dream survive?

Shell Game by Sara Paretsky:

Sara Paretsky follows her instant New York Times bestseller Fallout—her most widely read novel in years—with an extraordinary adventure that pits her acclaimed detective, V.I. Warshawski, against some of today’s most powerful figures.

Legendary sleuth V.I. Warshawski returns to the Windy City to save an old friend’s nephew from a murder arrest. The case involves a stolen artifact that could implicate a shadowy network of international criminals. As V.I. investigates, the detective soon finds herself tangling with the Russian mob, ISIS backers, and a shady network of stock scams and stolen art that stretches from Chicago to the East Indies and the Middle East. In Shell Game, nothing and no one are what they seem, except for the detective herself, who loses sleep, money, and blood, but remains indomitable in her quest for justice.

That’s What I Thought: Poems by Gary Young:

Gary Young builds on his remarkable oeuvre with this heartening volume, his seventh. His new poems, full of the pleasures and concerns of everyday life, brim with subtle wit and wisdom. Set implicitly along the coastal landscape of northern California, Young’s longtime home, they are latest achievements of a poet renown for “the capturing of small, daily miracles” (Dorianne Laux) in his masterful prose poems.

Have a great week!

Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day:

RBDigital

Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available.

About Library Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening October 12, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our musical recommendations for the week; five streaming suggestions* and one recommended album on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

Jammin’ in Georgia by Harlem Stompers (Genre: Blues/Jazz):

The Harlem Stompers consisted of drummer and band leader William Henry “Chick” Webb, John Trueheart on guitar, Don Kirkpatrick on piano, Bobby Stark on trumpet, Johnny Hodges on saxophone and Ella Fitzgerald as a featured vocalist. The group formed in the late 1920s and played through the 1930s with an expanded line-up. Unfortunately, Webb died young in 1939 at the age of  only 30 but fortunately, the great music he produced lives on.

This collection features just four great songs and gives you a good idea of the style of music that was popular during the Harlem Renaissance years.

The LP contains the songs: Jammin’ in George, My Understanding Man, Serenade to a Jitterbug and The Monkey Swing.

The Psychedelic World Of The 13th Floor Elevators (Genre: Rock, Psychedelic, Garage Band):

The 13th Floor Elevators hailed from Kerrville, Texas; and at its creative peak in the mid-sixties, the band consisted of Stacy Sutherland, John Ike Walton, Benny Therman, Tommy Hall and vocalist Roger Erickson. Erickson became the lead singer and front man for the band.

The Psychedelic World of The 13 Floor Elevators was the band’s first albums and its 1966 release date shows it is clearly one of the first psychedelic rock LPs to be released.

And to this listener’s ears, the music sound a bit psychedelic and bit like a garage band; by any designation though, this album features fun rock n roll!

Songs on the LP include: Your Gonna Miss Me, Roller Coaster, Splash 1, Everybody Needs Somebody and the aptly titled Fire Engine.

Under The Covers, Vol. 1 by Susanna Hoffs & Matthew Sweet (Genre: Rock):

Hoffs and Sweet are both huge fans of sixties pop and rock, which is something you can hear in their solo projects, and of course, in Hoffs’s work with The Bangles.They join up for this album to record cover versions of some great sixties songs – and they succeed in offering an upbeat and fun album that shows their obvious love for the music.

Songs on the LP include: And Your Bird Can Sing, It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue, Who Knows Where the Time Goes, The Warmth of the Sun and Different Drum.

Wish I Was Here by Various Artists (Genre: Soundtrack, Indie, Pop, Rock):

This 2004 soundtrack features a collection of contemplative songs by a mix of artists old and new.

The coming of age theme of the movie sets the tone for the songs on the soundtrack which include: So Now What by The Shins, Wish I Was Here by Cold Play & Cat Power, Mend by The Weepies, The Obvious Child by Paul Simon and Raven’s Song by Aaron Embry.

Recommended CD of the Week:

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) & Magical Mystery Tour (1967) by The Beatles (Genre: Rock):

I’m recommending two albums on CD this week because I came across the neat video for Strawberry Fields Forever on YouTube while doing research for this posting, and, the song was the first one recorded for the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band but didn’t appear on an album until Magical Mystery Tour was released.

And the music of The Beatles is always worth another listen.

And incidentally, our library owns all the Beatles albums on CD – so check them out!

Songs on Sgt. Pepper include: With A Little Help From My Friends, Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds, Getting Better, Fixing A Hole, Lovely Rita and Good Morning Good Morning.

Songs on Magical Mystery Tour include: Fool On The Hill, Magical Mystery Tour, Strawberry Fields Forever, Penny Lane, I Am The Walrus and All You need is love

Videos of the Week:

Jamin’ In George (1939) by Harlem Stompers

You’re Gonna Miss Me by 13th Floor Elevators

Different Drum by Susanna Hoffs and Matthew Sweet

So Now What? By The Shins

Strawberry Fields Forever by The Beatles

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance By Aberjhani, Sandra L. West

https://books.google.com/books?id=XP48QWTmjyUC&pg=PA355&lpg=PA355&dq=Harlem+Stompers&source=bl&ots=XwrULHUTg0&sig=E9JmlkxB9sNALBbVeJxlcgl5NLQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiah76nge3dAhWRdN8KHX-2C38Q6AEwDXoECAAQAQ#v=onepage&q=Harlem%20Stompers&f=false

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Suggested Reading Week of October 8, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

(Note: Click on the photo of the item you’d like to request or check out)

Digital Suggestions Of The Week:

Betty Ford First Lady, Women’s Advocate, Survivor, Trailblazer by Lisa McCubbin & Susan Ford Bales (Format: eBook):

An intimate and insightful biography of Betty Ford, the groundbreaking, candid, and resilient First Lady and wife of President Gerald Ford, from the #1 New York Times bestselling coauthor of Five Presidents and Mrs. Kennedy and Me.

Betty Ford: First Lady, Women’s Advocate, Survivor, Trailblazer is the inspiring story of an ordinary Midwestern girl thrust onto the world stage and into the White House under extraordinary circumstances. Setting a precedent as First Lady, Betty Ford refused to be silenced by her critics as she publicly championed equal rights for women, and spoke out about issues that had previously been taboo—breast cancer, depression, abortion, and sexuality. Privately, there were signs something was wrong. After a painful intervention by her family, she admitted to an addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs. Her courageous decision to speak out publicly sparked a national dialogue, and in 1982, she co-founded the Betty Ford Center, which revolutionized treatment for alcoholism and inspired the modern concept of recovery.

Lisa McCubbin also brings to light Gerald and Betty Ford’s sweeping love story: from Michigan to the White House, until their dying days, their relationship was that of a man and woman utterly devoted to one another other—a relationship built on trust, respect, and an unquantifiable chemistry.

Based on intimate in-depth interviews with all four of her children, Susan Ford Bales, Michael Ford, Jack Ford, and Steven Ford, as well as family friends, and colleagues, Betty Ford: First Lady, Women’s Advocate, Survivor, Trailblazer is a deeply personal, empathic portrait of an outspoken First Lady, who was first and foremost a devoted wife and mother. With poignant details and rare insight, McCubbin reveals a fiercely independent woman who had a lively sense of humor, unwavering faith, and an indomitable spirit—the true story behind one of the most admired and influential women of our time.

The Good Son: A Novel by You-Jeong Jeong (Format: eBook):

“Ingeniously twisted.” —Entertainment Weekly, “Must List”

“The summer’s must-read psychological thriller.” —Lenny Letter

Finalist for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’s “Summer Reads” Book Club

The Talented Mr. Ripley meets The Bad Seed in this breathless, chilling psychological thriller by the #1 bestselling novelist known as “Korea’s Stephen King”

Who can you trust if you can’t trust yourself?

Early one morning, twenty-six-year-old Yu-jin wakes up to a strange metallic smell, and a phone call from his brother asking if everything’s all right at home – he missed a call from their mother in the middle of the night. Yu-jin soon discovers her murdered body, lying in a pool of blood at the bottom of the stairs of their stylish Seoul duplex. He can’t remember much about the night before; having suffered from seizures for most of his life, Yu-jin often has trouble with his memory. All he has is a faint impression of his mother calling his name. But was she calling for help? Or begging for her life?

Thus begins Yu-jin’s frantic three-day search to uncover what happened that night, and to finally learn the truth about himself and his family. A shocking and addictive psychological thriller, The Good Son explores the mysteries of mind and memory, and the twisted relationship between a mother and son, with incredible urgency.

Named a Must-Read Book of the Summer by Elle, Entertainment Weekly, Vulture, CrimeReads, Lit Hub, The Millions, Electric Literature, and Brit + Co

Halloween Poems, Volume 1 by Various Authors (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

POEMS FOR HALLOWEEN – An Introduction. I should be whispering this because Halloween is almost upon us. A time of Witches, Ghouls and Hauntings and all kinds of scary things that come out the evening before All Saints Day to wreak…I’m glad you’re listening so let us begin- Many of us remember that feeling from childhood when an adult or even our friends would tell us scary stories of things that go bump in the night. It was a time to scare and be scared and no matter how terrifying the stories were it was a good feeling punctuated by yelps and laughs. Halloween is now firmly established in the Calendar as a favourite; to go trick or treating and an excuse for kids everywhere to dress up in outlandish attire and collect vast quantities of sweets. Equally adults everywhere are prone to switch off the lights and pretend to be out! In our collection the poems show that words have been used to enthral and suggest dark mysterious forces beyond our control for quite some time. With authors of the ability of Keats, Poe, Byron, Sheehan & Shakespeare, to nourish these primeval fears the poems have an unsettling nature as all bad things should! This collection of poems is read to you by Ghizela Rowe & Gideon Wagner.

Ninety-Nine Glimpses of Princess Margaret by Craig Brown (Format: eBook)

“Rollicking, irresistible, un-put-downable . . . For anyone . . . who swooned to Netflix’s The Crown, this book will be manna from heaven.” —Hamish Bowles, Vogue

“Ninety-Nine Glimpses of Princess Margaret is a brilliant, eccentric treat.” —Anna Mundow, The Wall Street Journal

I ripped through the book with the avidity of Margaret attacking her morning vodka and orange juice . . . The wisdom of the book, and the artistry, is in how Brown subtly expands his lens from Margaret’s misbehavior . . . to those who gawked at her, who huddled around her, pens poised over their diaries, hoping for the show she never denied them.” —Parul Sehgal, The New York Times

“Brown has done something astonishing: He makes the reader care, even sympathize, with perhaps the last subject worthy of such affection . . . His book is big fun, equal measures insightful and hysterical.” —Karen Heller, The Washington Post

A witty and profound portrait of the most talked-about English royal

She made John Lennon blush and Marlon Brando tongue-tied. She iced out Princess Diana and humiliated Elizabeth Taylor. Andy Warhol photographed her. Jack Nicholson offered her cocaine. Gore Vidal revered her. Francis Bacon heckled her. Peter Sellers was madly in love with her. For Pablo Picasso, she was the object of sexual fantasy.

Princess Margaret aroused passion and indignation in equal measures. To her friends, she was witty and regal. To her enemies, she was rude and demanding. In her 1950s heyday, she was seen as one of the most glamorous and desirable women in the world. By the time of her death in 2002, she had come to personify disappointment. One friend said he had never known an unhappier woman. The tale of Princess Margaret is Cinderella in reverse: hope dashed, happiness mislaid, life mishandled.

Such an enigmatic and divisive figure demands a reckoning that is far from the usual fare. Combining interviews, parodies, dreams, parallel lives, diaries, announcements, lists, catalogues, and essays, Craig Brown’s Ninety-Nine Glimpses of Princess Margaret is a kaleidoscopic experiment in biography and a witty meditation on fame and art, snobbery and deference, bohemia and high society.

Red War written by Vince Flynn & read by Kyle Mills (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

The #1 New York Times bestselling series returns with Mitch Rapp racing to prevent Russia’s gravely ill leader from starting a full-scale war with NATO.

When Russian president Maxim Krupin discovers that he has inoperable brain cancer, he’s determined to cling to power. His first task is to kill or imprison any of his countrymen who can threaten him. Soon, though, his illness becomes serious enough to require a more dramatic diversion—war with the West.

Upon learning of Krupin’s condition, CIA director Irene Kennedy understands that the US is facing an opponent who has nothing to lose. The only way to avoid a confrontation that could leave millions dead is to send Mitch Rapp to Russia under impossibly dangerous orders. With the Kremlin’s entire security apparatus hunting him, he must find and kill a man many have deemed the most powerful in the world.

Success means averting a war that could consume all of Europe. But if his mission is discovered, Rapp will plunge Russia and America into a conflict that neither will survive.
“In the world of black-ops thrillers, Mitch Rapp continues to be among the best of the best” (Booklist, starred review).

Print Suggestions Of The Week:

Becoming Lincoln by William W. Freehling:

Previous biographies of Abraham Lincoln—universally acknowledged as one of America’s greatest presidents—have typically focused on his experiences in the White House. In Becoming Lincoln, renowned historian William Freehling instead emphasizes the prewar years, revealing how Lincoln came to be the extraordinary leader who would guide the nation through its most bitter chapter.

Freehling’s engaging narrative focuses anew on Lincoln’s journey. The epic highlights Lincoln’s difficult family life, first with his father and later with his wife. We learn about the staggering number of setbacks and recoveries Lincoln experienced. We witness Lincoln’s famous embodiment of the self-made man (although he sought and received critical help from others).

The book traces Lincoln from his tough childhood through incarnations as a bankrupt with few prospects, a superb lawyer, a canny two-party politician, a great orator, a failed state legislator, and a losing senatorial candidate, to a winning presidential contender and a besieged six weeks as a pre-war president.

As Lincoln’s individual life unfolds, so does the American nineteenth century. Few great Americans have endured such pain but been rewarded with such success. Few lives have seen so much color and drama. Few mirror so uncannily the great themes of their own society. No one so well illustrates the emergence of our national economy and the causes of the Civil War.

The book concludes with a substantial epilogue in which Freehling turns to Lincoln’s wartime presidency to assess how the preceding fifty-one years of experience shaped the Great Emancipator’s final four years. Extensively illustrated, nuanced but swiftly paced, and full of examples that vividly bring Lincoln to life for the modern reader, this new biography shows how an ordinary young man from the Midwest prepared to become, against almost absurd odds, our most tested and successful president.

Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity by Michael Kinch:

A smart and compelling examination of the science of immunity, the public policy implications of vaccine denial, and the real-world outcomes of failing to vaccinate.

If you have a child in school, you may have heard stories of long-dormant diseases suddenly reappearing—cases of measles, mumps, rubella, and whooping cough cropping up everywhere from elementary schools to Ivy League universities because a select group of parents refuse to vaccinate their children.

Between Hope and Fear tells the remarkable story of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and their social and political implications. While detailing the history of vaccine invention, Kinch reveals the ominous reality that our victories against vaccine-preventable diseases are not permanent—and could easily be undone. In the tradition of John Barry’s The Great Influenza and Siddhartha Mukherjee’s The Emperor of All Maladies, Between Hope and Fear relates the remarkable intersection of science, technology and disease that has helped eradicate many of the deadliest plagues known to man.

Dr. Strange Beard by Penny Reid:

Hunches, horse races, and heartbreak

Ten years after Simone Payton broke his heart, all Roscoe Winston wants is a doughnut. He’d also like to forget her entirely, but that’s never going to happen. Roscoe Winston remembers everything—every look, every word, every single unrequited second—and the last thing he needs is another memory of Simone.

Unfortunately, after one chance encounter, Simone keeps popping up everywhere he happens to be . . .

Ten years after Roscoe Winston dropped out of her life, all Simone Payton wants is to exploit him. She’d also like some answers from her former best friend about why he ghosted her, but if she never gets those answers, that’s a-okay. Simone let go of the past a long time ago. Seriously, she has. She totally, totally has. She is definitely not still thinking about Roscoe. Nope. She’s more than happy to forget he exists.

But first, she needs just one teeny-tiny favor . . .

Dr. Strange Beard is a full-length romantic comedy novel, can be read as a stand-alone, and is the fifth book in the USA TODAY bestselling Winston Brothers series.

Under Fire: Reporting from the Front Lines of the Trump White House by April Ryan: 

Veteran White House reporter April Ryan thought she had seen everything in her two decades as a White House correspondent. And then came the Trump administration. In Under Fire, Ryan takes us inside the confusion and chaos of the Trump White House to understand how she and other reporters adjusted to the new normal. She takes us inside the policy debates, the revolving door of personnel appointments, and what it is like when she, as a reporter asking difficult questions, finds herself in the spotlight, becoming part of the story. With the world on edge and a country grappling with a new controversy almost daily, Ryan gives readers a glimpse into current events from her perspective, not only from inside the briefing room but also as a target of those who want to avoid answering probing questions. After reading her new book, readers will have an unprecedented inside view of the Trump White House and what it is like to be a reporter Under Fire.

Your Duck Is My Duck by Deborah Eisenberg:

A much-anticipated collection of brilliantly observant short stories from one of the great American masters of the form.

At times raucously hilarious, at times charming and delightful, at times as solemn and mysterious as a pond at midnight, Deborah Eisenberg’s stories gently compel us to confront the most disturbing truths about ourselves—from our intimate lives as lovers, parents, and children, to our equally troubling roles as citizens on a violent, terrifying planet.

Each of the six stories in Your Duck is My Duck, her first collection since 2006, has the heft and complexity of a novel. With her own inexorable but utterly unpredictable logic and her almost uncanny ability to conjure the strange states of mind and emotion that constitute our daily consciousness, Eisenberg pulls us as if by gossamer threads through her characters—a tormented woman whose face determines her destiny; a group of film actors shocked to read a book about their past; a privileged young man who unexpectedly falls into a love affair with a human rights worker caught up in an all-consuming quest that he doesn’t understand.

In Eisenberg’s world, the forces of money, sex, and power cannot be escaped, and the force of history, whether confronted or denied, cannot be evaded. No one writes better about time, tragedy and grief, and the indifferent but beautiful universe around us.

Have a great week!

Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day:

RBDigital

Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available.

About Library Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening October 5, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations for the week; four streaming suggestions* and one recommended album on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

1. The Essential Otis Rush: The Classic Cobra Recordings 1956-1958 (Genre: Blues, Guitar):

This is a wonderful collection of songs from the great blues guitarist who died last week.

Songs in the collection include: I Can’t Quit You Baby, My Love Will Never Die, Groaning the Blues, Jump Sister Rosie, Double Trouble and All Your Love.

2. American Horror Songs by Various Artists (Genre: Pop, Swing, Spoken, Rock):

A collection of fun “horror” songs by a mix of classic and contemporary artists including Shooter Jennings, Ann Williams, Cab Calloway, Dirk Jacobs & His Orchestra and the Ohio Express. This is a cool album perfect for the month of Halloween.

Songs on the LP include: Halloween by Betty Grable and David Wayne, The Wobblin’ Goblin by Rosemary Clooney, The Little Man Who Wasn’t There by The Glen Miller Orchestra, Halloween by Bob Hope, The Raven by Basil Rathbone, The Ghost of Ol’ Man Moss by Harry Gold and Nightmare by The Velvets.

3. To The Roots and Back (1972) by Lloyd Price:

A classic LP by the pop and R&B favorite sees him updating some of his classic fifties hits for the seventies era.

Songs on the LP include: Sing a Song, They Get Down, It Ain’t Easy, Lawdy Miss Clawdy, Stagger Lee and Personality — all with a seventies spin on them!

4. Fabulous Fifty 5 LPs: This is a fun set of five albums available to stream and download separately from Freegal. The albums feature a great combo of fifties pop, rhythm and blues and rock – perfect for parties or just weekend listening.

Here are the albums in the series:

Fabulous 50′ Vol. 1 – Instrumental Versions (Genre: Pop, R&B, Fifties Rock):

Songs on the album include: Blue Tango by Leroy Anderson, Song for a Summer Night by Mitch Mitchell And His Orchestra, Autumn Leaves by Morris Stoloff, So Rare by Jimmy Dorsey and Sail Along, Silvery Moon by Billy Vaughn.

Fabulous 50′ Vol. 2 – Sung Originals (Genre: Pop, R&B & Fifties Rock):

Songs on the LP include: Venus by Frankie Avalon, Be Bop Baby by Ricky Nelson, Sixteen Tons by Tennessee Ernie Ford, Mack the Knife by Bobby Darin and Crazy Love by Paul Anka.

Fabulous 50′ Vol. 3 – Sung Originals (Genre: Pop, R&B, Fifties Rock):

Songs on the LP include: Too Young by Nat King Cole, Charlie Brown by The Coasters, Witch Doctor by David Seville, Lollipop by The Chordettes, Just Because by Lloyd Price and Papa Loves Mambo by Perry Combo.

Fabulous 50′ Vol. 4 – Sung Originals  (Genre: Pop, R&B, Fifties Rock):

Songs on the LP include: Stood Up by Ricky Nelson, Kiss of Fire by Georgia Gibbs, My Special Angel by Bobby Helms, Summertime Blues by Eddie Cochran and Razzle Dazzle by Bill Haley.

Fabulous 50’ Vol. 5 – Sung Originals  (Genre: Pop, R&B, Fifties Rock):

Songs on the album include: Jamaica Farewell by Harry Belafonte, Sh Boom by The Crew Cuts, Blueberry Hill by Fats Domino, Reveille Rock by Johnny & The Hurricanes and Bye, Bye Love by The Everly Brothers.

Recommended CD of the Week:

Over The Years (2018) by Graham Nash (Genre: Pop, Rock, Vocal): 

Arriving nearly a decade after the career-spanning 2009 box Reflections, Over the Years… isn’t nearly as ambitious a compilation as its predecessor. In its simplest form, it’s a collection of 15 highlights from Nash’s career, using the first Crosby, Stills & Nash album as its starting point and running until his 2016 album, This Path Tonight. Despite that designation, Over the Years… largely lingers on material made during the ’70s and early ’80s, anchored on CSN standards (“Marrakesh Express,” “Just a Song Before I Go,” “Teach Your Children,” “Our House,” “Wasted on the Way”) and featuring two Crosby & Nash tracks (“Immigration Man,” “Wind on the Water”) in addition to five solo cuts. All of this makes for a nice capsule introduction, but for the dedicated, the selling point is the second disc on the Deluxe Edition, which collects 15 demos. The great majority of these — 12, as a matter of fact — were recorded between 1968 and 1972, with three of the previously mentioned CSN classics from the twilight of the ’70s rounding out the disc. A few of these were previously released, but taken as a collective, these unadorned recordings — just a guitar and a voice, save “Wind on the Water” and “Just a Song Before I Go,” where Nash plays piano, and “Wasted on the Way,” which features Stephen Stills on harmony — strip away not just the studio polish but nostalgia, revealing the delicate craft that lies behind them.

Videos of the Week:

I Can’t Quit You Baby by Otis Rush

The Black Cat by Buddy Morrow & His Orchestra

In The Cold, Cold Night by Wanda Jackson and Shooter Jennings

The Monster Twist by Tyrone A’Saurus and his Cro-Magnons

Personality by Lloyd Price

Have You Ever Loved A Woman by Freddie King

Stood Up by Ricky Nelson

Lollipop & Mr. Sandman by The Chordettes introduced by Dick Clark

Immigration Man by Graham Nash

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Did You Know…Halloween!

This month our Did You Know posting has an obvious subject!

Did You Know…

The library has spooky books that offer perfect reading for the Halloween season?

And I’m sure everyone will have thought “Yes, I did know that,”  in advance.

However, since Halloween is fun…

Here is a selection of neat and spooky titles for your perusal:

American Ghost by Hannah Nordhaus:

It’s one thing to hunt for a ghost that’s an absolute stranger, but it’s another when the ghost is actually connected to you: When Nordhaus finds out that her great-great-grandmother famously haunts a Santa Fe hotel, she embarks on a quest with psychics and diviners to meet her spectral relative, find out why she died — and why she’s been sticking around.

Amityville Horror by Jay Anson:

You’ve seen the movie: Now read the book! While the veracity of some of the events in the book has been called into question, Anson’s telling still terrifies. The Lutz family moves into a steal of a home in 1975, in which a year earlier, Ronald DeFeo had murdered his family: parents, brothers, and sisters. The haunting that follows the Lutz family’s arrival is so vicious, they stay in the house less than a month.

Best Ghost Stories 1800-1849: A Classic Ghost Anthology edited by Andrew Barger:

Ghost stories became very popular in the first half of the nineteenth century and this collection by Andrew Barger contains the very scariest of them all. Some stories thought too horrific were published anonymously like “A Night in a Haunted House” and “The Deaf and Dumb Girl.” The later story is collected for the first time in any anthology since its original publication in 1839.

The other ghost stories in this fine collection are by famous authors. “The Mask of the Red Death,” by Edgar Allan Poe; “A Chapter in the History of a Tyrone Family,” by Joseph Sheridan le Fanu; “The Spectral Ship,” by Wilhelm Hauff ; “The Old Maid in the Winding Sheet,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne; “The Adventure of the German Student,” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” by Washington Irving; as well as “The Tapestried Chamber,” by Sir Walter Scott.

Big Book of New York Ghost Stories edited by Cheri Farnsworth:

More than 100 stories from each region of the Empire State gathered by New York’s celebrated Ghost Author, Cheri Revai (Farnsworth).

Blackbird Season by Kate Moretti:

When hundreds of starlings inexplicably fall from the sky during a high school baseball game coached by Nate Winters, things start to go wrong for the popular Mt. Oanoke, Pa., math teacher, in this intricately plotted thriller from bestseller Moretti (The Vanishing). Nate’s marriage to Alecia, already strained by the need to care for the couple’s autistic son, is further tested when a reporter for the local paper accuses him of taking advantage of a student, Lucia Hamm, during the chaos caused by the falling birds. Nate denies acting inappropriately, but the school principal puts Nate on temporary suspension until the police complete their investigation. Nate later makes a series of bad decisions that make him look guilty, such as misleading Alecia about time he spent with Lucia, purportedly to spare his wife’s feelings. His position deteriorates further after Lucia goes missing. Fortunately, a fellow teacher and friend, Bridget Peterson, may hold the key to proving Nate’s innocence. This cautionary tale keeps the reader guessing to the end. – Library Journal Review.

Burntown by Jennifer McMahon:

Fans of McMahon’s eight earlier novels (The Winter People, etc) will be intrigued by this complex and quirky mystery set in a rundown Vermont mill town, where orphaned teenage Eva (street name Necco) lives in an abandoned car with her boyfriend, Hermes. Her grandparents have been murdered, her parents also died suspiciously, and her brother is missing. Necco recalls a mysterious machine, built by her father from plans stolen from Thomas Edison, that can talk with the dead; a killer now wants those plans and thinks Necco has them. Through a series of strange events, Necco is befriended by the Fire Eaters, a group of outcast nomadic women; Theo, a female student drug dealer; and Pru, the school cafeteria worker. There might be two killers after Necco and the plans, and as her memory of earlier family deaths returns, she realizes she does know enough about her father’s strange machine to be in danger. This is a well-crafted story with plenty of suspense to keep readers engrossed. Publisher’s Weekly Review

Come Closer by Sara Gran:

Sara Gran’s 2011 novel is a haunted story for the modern age. Protagonist Amanda burns her husband with cigarettes, dreams of affairs, and insults her boss after a demon named Naamah takes over her brain, behavior, and life. The pace quickens as Amanda’s happy marriage takes dark, dark plunge.

Diviners by Libba Bray:

An occultish murder mystery will keep you up long after dark. Evie O’Neill has been exiled from her boring old hometown and shipped off to the bustling streets of New York City—and she is pos-i-tute-ly ecstatic. It’s 1926, and New York is filled with speakeasies, Ziegfeld girls, and rakish pickpockets. The only catch is that she has to live with her uncle Will and his unhealthy obsession with the occult.

Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker:

From the bestselling author of All Is Not Forgotten, a thriller about two missing sisters, a twisted family, and what happens when one girl comes back…

One night three years ago, the Tanner sisters disappeared: fifteen-year-old Cass and seventeen-year-old Emma. Three years later, Cass returns, without her sister Emma. Her story is one of kidnapping and betrayal, of a mysterious island where the two were held. But to forensic psychiatrist Dr. Abby Winter, something doesn’t add up. Looking deep within this dysfunctional family Dr. Winter uncovers a life where boundaries were violated and a narcissistic parent held sway. And where one sister’s return might just be the beginning of the crime.

Bestselling author Wendy Walker returns with another winning psychological thriller, Emma in the Night.

Exorcist by William Peter Blatty:

Sure, the film version is scary, but imagine reading the actual narrative without the pea soup vomit image in your head. For the uninitiated, 12-year-old Regan MacNeil is possessed by a demon spirit, and her famous mother enlists a priest to perform an exorcism. Inspired by rumors and partially true events, The Exorcist is a classic portrayal of the demonic possession.
Far from a place of rest, the house is a place of judgment, and Mr. Morningside and his unusual staff are meant to execute their own justice on those who are past being saved.

Get In Trouble by Kelly Link:

The short story collection Get In Trouble took Kelly Link 10 years to produce, and tells tales of fairy-like “summer people,” superhero boyfriends, and wealthy families who put microchips in their children. It’s absurdist, surrealist fantasy fiction made to creep you out.

Good Me Bad Me by Ali Land:

INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER AND THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW’S EDITORS’ CHOICE

HOW FAR DOES THE APPLE REALLY FALL FROM THE TREE?

Good Me Bad Me is dark, compelling, voice-driven psychological suspense by debut author Ali Land: “Could not be more unputdownable if it was slathered with superglue.” —Sunday Express

Milly’s mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school.

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. As her mother’s trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all.

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother’s daughter.

Grave Keepers by Elizabeth Byrne:

If you inherited your eventual grave now, would you decorate it? If you thought the cemetary might be haunted, what would you do? Lately, Athena Windham has been spending all her spare time in her grave. Her parents—owners of a cemetery in Upstate New York—are proud of her devoutness, but her younger sister, Laurel, would rather spend her time exploring the forest that surrounds the Windham’s’ property than in her own grave.

Haunted: One Family’s Nightmare by Robert Curran:

Written by a priest, The Haunted details the chilling haunting of the devoutly religious Smurf family’s home from all sides: They hear phantom pigs squealing in the night, smell foul odors, feel they’re being watched while in the bathroom, and see floating people. Don’t read this one at night, folks.

Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson:

Shirley Jackson’s 1959 novel is one of the most celebrated haunted house fiction books of all time, and provided the basis for Robert Wise’s 1963 film The Haunting. When a paranormal investigator invites a small group of people, including a psychic and a troubled young woman, to the potentially haunted Hill House, they end up wishing they had never sought out the supernatural in the first place. You may find yourself going to sleep with the lights on after reading this one.

Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill:

The first novel from Stephen King’s son Joe Hill, Heart-Shaped Box follows former rock star Judas Coyne after he buys the funeral suit of a dead man to add to his collection of relics of dark magic. The suit, which arrives in a heart-shaped box, is still inhabited by its former wearer’s spirit, and it haunts Judas in this creepy tale of ghosts, black magic, and rock n roll.

House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons:

It’s not ghosts that terrorize the inhabitants of The House Next Door, but the house itself. Anne Rivers Siddons’ 1978 novel, which counts Stephen King among its devoted fans, is written from the perspective of a wealthy Atlanta suburbanite, who observes that every new resident that moves in to the big house next to her own suffers terrible tragedy. She and her husband vow to destroy the house just as its evil influence starts to spread to the rest of the neighborhood — but the house next door fights back.

House of Furies by Madeline Roux:

This gothic horror tale will have you screaming. After escaping a harsh school where punishment was the lesson of the day, seventeen-year-old Louisa Ditton is thrilled to find employment as a maid at a boarding house. But soon after her arrival at Coldthistle House, Louisa begins to realize that the house’s mysterious owner, Mr. Morningside, is providing much more than lodging for his guests.

Killer Harvest by Paul Cleave:

A new thriller from the Edgar-nominated author of Trust No One and Joe Victim about a blind teenager who receives a corneal donation and begins to see and feel memories from their previous owner—a homicide detective who was also his father.

Joshua is convinced there is a family curse. It’s taken loved ones from him, it’s robbed him of his eyesight, and it’s the reason why his father is killed while investigating the homicide of a young woman.

Joshua is handed an opportunity he can’t refuse: an operation that will allow him to see the world through his father’s eyes. As Joshua navigates a world of sight, he gets glimpses of what these eyes might have witnessed in their previous life. What exactly was his dad up to in his role as a police officer?

There are consequences to the secret life his father was living, including the wrath of a man hell bent on killing, a man who is drawing closer and closer to Joshua.

Joshua soon discovers a world darker than the one he has emerged from…

Thriller connoisseur Paul Cleave is back with another riveting story of hidden secrets and unspeakable horrors that will keep you guessing until the very last page.

Little Stranger by Sarah Waters:

Sarah Waters’ 2009 gothic novel takes place in post-WWII England, where a country doctor strikes up a friendship with the family at nearby Hundreds Hall. As he becomes more intimately acquainted with them, however, the historic estate experiences more and more strange happenings, and the family begins to unravel faster than the doctor can save them.

Mammoth Book of Vampires edited by Stephen Jones:

The masters of the macabre bring the dead to life in these never-before-collected stories and short novels of the vampire in all its frightening forms. Authors include Clive Barker, Robert Bloch, Ramsey Campbell, and David J. Schow. Includes the first publication of Red Reign, by Kim Newman, author of Bad Dreams and The Night Mayor.

Memory Trees by Kali Wallace:

Eight years after her sister Patience’s tragic death on her family’s remote apple orchard, Sorrow returns to the land, determined to find out what really happened the night Patience died and what other secrets may be waiting for her there. The apple orchard in Vermont was Sorrow Lovegood’s whole world– until her sister Patience’s tragic death. Sorrow was sent to Miami to live with her father, away from the only home she’d ever known. Now, eight years later, Sorrow’s memories of her life in Vermont are hazy. She returns to the orchard for the summer, determined to learn more about her childhood and the family she left behind. But it soon becomes clear that some of her questions have difficult– even dangerous– answers. And there may be a price to pay for asking.

Night Visions 2 Edited by Charles L. Grant:

This is the second in a series devoted to showcasing the work of fantasy and horror writers. The almost arbitrary bringing together of three disparate talents in one volume may be a questionable idea, but in this case it worksGrant has produced an enjoyable collection. David Morrell, best known for creating the character Rambo in his novel First Blood, contributes three stories, of which the best, “Mumbo Jumbo,” depicts a football player whose team’s success seems to depend on the coach’s voodoo worship. Joseph Payne Brennan is represented by five tales, including “Starlock Street,” in which an antiquarian learns how unpleasant retreat into a more genteel time and place can be. Karl Edward Wagner has three stories; “Shrapnel” is a deft chiller with a vision of Hell as an auto graveyard.

Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman:

The three Hempstock women (maiden, mother, and crone) would tell you they’re not witches, nor do they cast spells. But that’s just talk. Sure, these women are kind enough to shelter a scared little boy, but they can also bottle wormholes and summon inter-dimensional demon vultures.

Secret of Crickley Hall by James Herbert:

In James Herbert’s disturbing 2006 novel, after the tragic disappearance of one of their three children, a couple decides to leave London for Crickley Hall, on the English coast. Once there, however, the family finds that the house holds many secrets and has a dark history dating back to World War II, when it was a home for children evacuees. In 2012, The Secret of Crickley Hall was adapted into a BBC miniseries starring Game of Thrones’ Maisie Williams.

Shining by Stephen King:

In one episode of Friends, Joey hides his copy of The Shining in the freezer whenever he gets too scared reading it. It’s an appropriate depository for King’s 1977 novel, which takes place at the claustrophobic and inhospitable — not to mention haunted — Overlook Hotel, where main character Jack Torrance is the winter caretaker. While Stanley Kubrick’s iconic 1980 adaptation is classic Halloween viewing, the book (from which the film deviates significantly) is certainly worth reading if you’re looking for a good scare. You can always stick it in the freezer if it gets too disturbing.

Stranger in the House by Shari Lapena:

When Tom Krupp comes home from work, his wife’s car is gone, but the front door is unlocked and it’s clear that Karen has been preparing dinner in the kitchen. Most troubling of all, her purse and cell phone are still in the house. As he tries to understand what’s happening, the police arrive to announce that Karen has been in an accident. He rushes to his wife’s side in the hospital, but she can’t remember the accident, nor why she left the house or where she went. The police are suspicious, Tom struggles with his own doubts, and Karen’s best friend seems to be the only one who really believes her. Tension builds and relationships threaten to fall apart as Karen and Tom try to piece together what happened that night and what it means for their future, if they even have one. VERDICT The author of the acclaimed The Couple Next Door has written another fast-paced, engrossing psychological thriller that will have readers guessing until the very end. Cynthia Price, Francis Marion Univ. Lib., Florence, SC – Library Journal Review

Terror by Dan Simmons:

Dan Simmons’ 2007 novel takes readers through a fictionalized version of Sir John Franklin’s 1840s trip to the Arctic, and things go dark as Franklin and his crew travel further and further into the hostile climate. There’s rebellion, cannibalism, and one lingering polar bear-like monster. A non-linear narrative told from diary entries and third person exposition, The Terror shows the Northwest Passage may be more dangerous than we ever expected.

Turn of the Screw by Henry James:

James was a master of psychological complexity, and his famous 1898 novella engages the skewed perspective of a young woman, a governess to two small children at an estate in the English countryside. When she moves into the house, she begins seeing two phantom figures, a man and a woman, everywhere she goes, haunting her, going unaddressed by anyone else. Are the ghosts real or is the governess mad? Critics have debated the question since the book’s publication; decide for yourself after reading the story to its chilling, ambiguous conclusion.
Until, of course, more important question arose, at which time everyone promptly forgot that a thousand birds fell on the town of Mount Oanoke at all.”

Wicked the life and times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire:

This re-creation of the land of Oz, tells the story of Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, who wasn’t so wicked after all. Past the yellow brick road and into a phantasmagoric world rich with imagination and allegory, Wicked just might change the reputation of one of the most sinister characters in literature

Witches of Eastwick by John Updike:

Throughout history, “witch” has often been deployed as a derogatory stereotype meant to demonize powerful women. Here, Updike’s trio of divorcees reclaim female strength by injecting some magic into a place that badly needs it: the postwar American suburbs.

Witching Hour by Anne Rice:

Well known for her vampire trilogy, Rice now turns to witches. Here she tells the story of the prominent and wealthy Mayfair family who, for five centuries, has cavorted with a supernatural entity that has brought them both great bounty as well as abject misery. Neurosurgeon Rowan Mayfair inherits the family fortune, along with the sinister attentions of this entity. When Rowan saves the life of Michael Curry their fates become entwined, and together they seek to understand and destroy the terrible force that holds her family in its power. Helping them in this dangerous task is occult investigator Aaron Lightner, introduced to readers in Rice’s The Queen of the Damned ( LJ 10/1/88). Although a bit long-winded at times, this is still a compelling novel. The author’s powerful writing and strong imagery keep the reader enthralled. — Patricia Altner, Dept. of Defense Lib., Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C – Library Journal Review

Have a great October!

Linda, SSCL