Suggested Listening August 30, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our five musical recommendations of the week!

This week our five music recommendation are:

1. Every 100 Years: The Woody Guthrie Songbook by Woody Guthrie (Format: Print Book):

2012 would have been the 100th birthday of American singer/songwriter Woody Guthrie. To mark his extraordinary achievements in songwriting, we are releasing this souvenir centennial songbook. Woody Guthrie wrote over 3,000 songs in his lifetime, yet only 300 or so were ever recorded. At the invitation of Guthrie’s daughter, Nora Guthrie, contemporary singer/songwriters have set music to Guthrie’s previously unpublished lyrics. Musicians such as Billy Bragg, Wilco, Dropkick Murphys, Jonatha Brooke, Jay Farrar, Tom Morello, Lou Reed, The Klezmatics, Hans-Eckardt Wenzel, Madeleine Peyroux, Janis Ian, Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion, and Woody’s son, Arlo Guthrie, have shown us how timeless Woody’s words are. Every 100 Years is a compilation of 100 Woody Guthrie songs that run the gamut from work songs, love songs and union & protest songs, to topical songs and children’s songs. The book features his classics such as: This Land Is Your Land * Jesus Christ * Do Re Mi * Pretty Boy Floyd * Roll On Columbia * Pastures of Plenty * Deportee * Riding in My Car * and more, as well as hits from the next generation of Guthrie co-authors: California Stars * I’m Shippin’ Up to Boston * The Jolly Banker * Way Over Yonder in the Minor Key * Hoodoo Voodoo * Ease My Revolutionary Mind * Ingrid Bergman * My Peace * Mermaid’s Avenue * Happy Joyous Hanukkah * Every 100 Years * and many others. Includes a preface from Howie Richmond, founder of The Richmond Organization Guthrie’s publisher, as well as other commentary from friends, family, and Woody himself along with photos and facsimiles of Guthrie’s original drawings and hand-written lyrics.

2. Songs of Work And Protest: 100 Favorite Songs of American Works Complete With Music And Historical Notes by Edith Fowke & Joe Glazer (Format: Print Book):

No other form could capture the history of the labor movement better than the songs sung in times both bitter and courageous by coal miners and textile workers, railroad men and steelworkers, farmers, seamen, and cow-hands as they worked to supply the nation’s needs and as they worked to defeat political and industrial tyranny, child labor, hunger, poverty, and unemployment. This collection includes a hundred songs of the people, as they have been sung at one time or another on the workers’ long road toward freedom and justice, together with the stories of the genuine situations from which they sprang.

They are straight trade union songs and ditties; specific songs of miners, textile workers, steel, and railway workers and farmers; typical working songs of sailors, canalers, lumberjacks, and cowboys; songs of the hardships that working men and women have to face during times of depression; philosophic songs and ironic comments on the economic system; songs that grew out of the fight against slavery; and songs expressing the dreams of people of many lands throughout the ages. Often set to tunes of familiar folk songs, popular songs, and gospel hymns, these are the songs by which unions organized and which the members of each labor group sang out. They are songs sung to words by itinerant wanderers, unlettered farmers, and factory hands; songs by Joe Hill, Ralph Chaplin, Joe Glazer, Merle Traive, Woody Guthrie, the Almanac Singers; songs by famous poets such as Burns and Blake. Most of the songs are American in origin. A few, drawn from England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Germany, Israel, and the Philippines, remind us that the fight for freedom knows no boundaries. The songs are presented with simple piano accompaniments and guitar chords to encourage their use in group singing.

This collection includes 100 songs from the history of the labor movement, together with the stories of the genuine situations from which they sprang. Includes songs by Joe Hill, Ralph Chaplin, Joe Glazer, Merle Travis, Woody Guthrie, the Almanac Singers, and others from around the globe. “Union Maid,” “Joe Hill,” “We Shall Not Be Moved,” and many more.

The songs of work and the songs of protest are, in a very important sense, the songs of the New World, capturing the stirring sounds and deep emotions of people over hundreds of years on the march to build a better world. Whether you are looking for material for singing or whether you are looking for material on the struggles of the labor movement, there will be much in this important collection for song and for thought.

3. Songs of the Suffragettes sung by Elizabeth McKnight (Format: Music CD):

Original Album Description: It is hard to believe in modern times that the issue of women’s suffrage once wracked the nation. Riots, demonstrations, and indignant editorials highlight the history of this long battle that finally ended in 1920 with the 19th Amendment. Liner notes by Irwin Silber include a brief history of the suffrage movement, lyrics and background on the 16 tracks, and black-and-white political cartoons.

Song List:
Columbia’s Daughters
Uncle Sam’s Wedding
Keep Woman in Her Sphere
Let Us All Speak Our Minds
The Taxation Tyranny
The Promised Land
The Suffrage Flag
Winning The Vote
Give the Ballot to the Mothers
Song of Wyoming
Going to the Polls
Where Are Your Boys Today!
The Yellow Ribbon
Hallelujah Song
Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be!
The New America

4. A Treasury of Library of Congress Field Recordings by Various Artists (Format: Music CD):

Thirty Library of Congress field recordings from 1933 to 1946, compiled and thoroughly annotated by Stephen Wade. There are many Library of Congress collections, but the diversity of performances on this disc might make one of the better selections for someone who’s interested enough in folkloric recordings to have just a few, as opposed to an academic who wants to hear as much as possible. There’s Appalachian folk music, African-American spirituals, nursery rhymes by black Mississippi children, rural Southern blues, and even an a cappella ballad by a Harvard-educated judge. There are a couple of well-known performers as well: Woody Guthrie does “The Gypsy Davy,” and Sonny Terry has a trademark puffing harmonica workout on “Lost John.” But largely these are folks who performed mostly for their neighbors or houses of worship. It’s not the point of a collection such as this to illustrate how this music influenced pop, but there are some real interesting renditions of songs that later became famous in other hands: “Blood-Strained Banders” (done here by Jimmie Strothers) was adapted into “Good Shepherd” by the Jefferson Airplane; “Sea Lion Woman” (Christine and Katherine Shipp) was done by Nina Simone, and “Another Man Done Gone” (Vera Hall) was covered by John Mayall. There’s also the first recorded performance of “Rock Island Line” (by inmates at an Arkansas penitentiary in 1934), which became a folk music standard and eventually started the skiffle craze in England. Richie Unterberger, AllMusic Review

Song List:

Bonaparte’s Retreat by W.H. Stepp
Rock Island Line by Kelly Pace with Charlie Porter, L.T. Edwards, Willie Hubbard, Luther Williams, Napoleon Cooper, Albert Pate, Willie Lee Jones
Pretty Polly by E.C. Ball
Pullin’ the Skiff by Ora Dell Graham
Shortenin’ Bread by Ora Dell Graham
Sea Lion Woman by Christine & Katherine Shipp
Soldier’s Joy by Nashville Washboard Band
Another Man Done Gone by Vera Hall
Northfield by Paine Denson
When I Lay My Burden Down by Turner Junior Johnson
Grub Springs by W.E. Claunch
Ain’t No Grave Can Hold My Body Down by Bozie Sturdivant
Creek Lullaby by Margaret
Coal Creek March by Pete Steele
Worried Life Blues by David “Honeyboy” Edwards
One Morning in May by Texas Gladden
Blood-Strained Banders by Jimmie Strothers
Goodbye, Old Paint by Jess Morris
Lead Me to the Rock by Wash Dennis and Charlie Sims
Glory in the Meetinghouse by Luther Strong
The Avondale Mine Disaster by John J. Quinn
Roll on the Ground by Thaddeus C. Willingham, Jr.
Diamond Joe by Charlie Butler
Lost John by Sonny Terry
Sept ans sur mer by Elita, Mary & Ella Hoffpauir
East Texas Rag by Smith Casey
Old Joe Clark by Wade Ward
The Gypsy Davy by Woody Guthrie
Kiowa Story of the Flute by Belo Cozad

5. Putumayo Presents Women’s Work by Various Artists (Format: Music CD):

    In 1996 the interest in singer-songwriters was cresting and women were a big part of the emerging trend. The songs they wrote were not about fanciful dream images; they came from real life and were insightful, bitter, funny, and often painfully intimate. While a vanguard of younger artists were just finding their way, established performers were also being rediscovered, and the two groups gave each other considerable inspiration and support. These 13 songs are an amazingly accurate time capsule of a period when the vogue finally shifted to include singers who used small forces to sort out big problems and overwhelming emotions. Romances go sour, philosophy brings cold comfort, and reality is sometimes too much to stomach, but the women keep going as best they can despite craziness, opposition on various fronts, and their own frailty. With Ani DiFranco, Janis Ian, Vonda Shepard, and Toni Childs. –Christina Roden, Amazon Review

Song List:
1. Cradle And All – Ani DiFranco
2. The Wolf – Catie Curtis
3. When The Silence Falls – Janis Ian
4. Maryland – Vonda Shepard
5. Just Enough – Toshi Reagon
6. Notion – Barbara Kessler
7. Letting Go – Fiona Joyce
8. Wild Horse – Eliza Gilkyson
9. Thru Cryin’ – Kristen Hall
10. If You Leave Me – Laura Love
11. Testimony – Ferron
12. Off The Ground – Christine Kane
13. I Met A Man (Live) – Toni Childs

BONUS Recommendation:

Norma Rae (1979) (Format: DVD):

In honor of American workers throughout the ages I’m going to recommend this great film!

If you haven’t seen it, it is timely as it shows both the lives of a group of working people, and what they achieved by supporting each other. Sally Field won an Oscar for her portrayal of the title character.

Film Synopsis by Hal Erickson, AllMovie: Norma Rae finds Sally Field cast in the title role, a minimum-wage worker in a cotton mill. The factory has taken too much of a toll on the health of Norma Rae’s family for her to ignore her Dickensian working conditions. After hearing a speech by New York union organizer Reuben (Ron Leibman), Norma Rae decides to join the effort to unionize her shop. This causes dissension at home when Norma Rae’s husband, Sonny (Beau Bridges), assumes that her activism is a result of a romance between herself and Reuben. Despite the pressure brought to bear by management, Norma Rae successfully orchestrates a shutdown of the mill, resulting in victory for the union and capitulation to its demands. Based on a true story, Norma Rae is the film for which Sally Field won her first Oscar; an additional Oscar went to David Shire and Norman Gimbel for the film’s theme song, “It Goes Like It Goes.”

Videos of the Week:

9 to 5 by Dolly Parton

Bread And Roses by Judy Collins

Busted by Ray Charles & Johnny Cash

Columbia’s Daughters by Elizabeth McKnight

Hard Working Man by Brooks & Dunn

I’m Working On A Building by The Carter Family


Joe Hill by Joan Baez

Norma Rae Title Sequence

Old Doc Brown by Hank Snow

Solidarity Forever by Pete Seeger

There Is Power In A Union by Billy Bragg

T.R.O.U.B.L.E. by Elvis

Union Burying Ground by Woody Guthrie

Which Side Are You On by Pete Seeger

Working At The Car Wash Blues by Jim Croce

 

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS: OverDrive & RBDigital:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive and/or the RBDigital app, to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Reading August 26, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Because Internet written and read by Gretchen McCulloch (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER!!

A Wired Must-Read Book of Summer

“Gretchen McCulloch is the internet’s favorite linguist, and this book is essential reading. Reading her work is like suddenly being able to see the matrix.” —Jonny Sun, author of everyone’s a aliebn when ur a aliebn too

Because Internet is for anyone who’s ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message or wondered where memes come from. It’s the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that’s a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are.

Language is humanity’s most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. Internet conversations are structured by the shape of our apps and platforms, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What’s more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can watch language evolve in real time.

Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how your first social internet experience influences whether you prefer “LOL” or “lol,” why ~sparkly tildes~ succeeded where centuries of proposals for irony punctuation had failed, what emoji have in common with physical gestures, and how the artfully disarrayed language of animal memes like lolcats and doggo made them more likely to spread.

Dragons of Autumn Twilight by Margaret Weiss & Tracy Hickman (Format: eBook):

Lifelong friends, they went their separate ways. Now they are together again, though each holds secrets from the others in his heart. They speak of a world shadowed with rumors of war. They speak of tales of strange monsters, creatures of myth, creatures of legend. They do not speak of their secrets. Not then. Not until a chance encounter with a beautiful, sorrowful woman, who bears a magical crystal staff, draws the companions deeper into the shadows, forever changing their lives and shaping the fate of the world.

No one expected them to be heroes.

Least of all, them.

Moon of the Crusted Snow: A Novel written by Waubgeshig Rice and read by Billy Merasty (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

A daring post-apocalyptic novel from a powerful rising literary voice

With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow.
The community leadearship loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision.

Blending action and allegory, Moon of the Crusted Snow upends our expectations. Out of catastrophe comes resilience. And as one society collapses, another is reborn.

Never Have I Ever: A Novel by Joshilyn Jackson (Format: eBook):

“Wonderful—suspense and surprises, real characters, and a scary, ominous backbeat. This feels like the book Jackson was born to write.” —Lee Child, New York Times bestselling author

Named a Best Book by USA Today • People • Wall Street Journal • Time • Entertainment Weekly • Bustle • and many more!

From New York Times bestselling author Joshilyn Jackson, a twisting novel of domestic suspense in which a group of women play a harmless drinking game that escalates into a war of dark pasts

In this game, even winning can be deadly…

Amy Whey is proud of her ordinary life and the simple pleasures that come with it—teaching diving lessons, baking cookies for new neighbors, helping her best friend, Charlotte, run their local book club. Her greatest joy is her family: her devoted professor husband, her spirited fifteen-year-old stepdaughter, her adorable infant son. And, of course, the steadfast and supportive Charlotte. But Amy’s sweet, uncomplicated life begins to unravel when the mysterious and alluring Angelica Roux arrives on her doorstep one book club night.

Sultry and magnetic, Roux beguiles the group with her feral charm. She keeps the wine flowing and lures them into a game of spilling secrets. Everyone thinks it’s naughty, harmless fun. Only Amy knows better. Something wicked has come her way—a she-devil in a pricey red sports car who seems to know the terrible truth about who she is and what she once did.

When they’re alone, Roux tells her that if she doesn’t give her what she asks for, what she deserves, she’s going to make Amy pay for her sins. One way or another.

To protect herself and her family and save the life she’s built, Amy must beat the devil at her own clever game, matching wits with Roux in an escalating war of hidden pasts and unearthed secrets. Amy knows the consequences if she can’t beat Roux. What terrifies her is everything she could lose if she wins.

A diabolically entertaining tale of betrayal, deception, temptation, and love filled with dark twists leavened by Joshilyn Jackson’s trademark humor, Never Have I Ever explores what happens when the transgressions of our past come back with a vengeance.

Sisters of Summer’s End by Lori Foster (Format: eBook):

As the summer ends, friendship begins…

When single mom Joy Lee abandoned her old life to take a job at a lakeside resort, she found something that her family’s wealth and influence could never buy: peace of mind. Not easy to come by for the once-burned divorcée who keeps everyone at a distance. But when her new friend, Maris, dares her to take a chance with the drive-in’s charismatic new owner, everything changes for Joy and her young son.

A difficult childhood has left Maris Kennedy with definite priorities. Her job running Summer’s End, the camp store and café, comes first. Always. Nothing could ever make her risk that hard-won security—especially not her free-spirited colleague. But the more she encourages Joy to open herself up to new experiences, the more Maris begins to wonder what she, too, might be missing.

Learning how to trust will bring Joy and Maris together. And soon they form a friendship that leaves them as close as sisters—and open to love where they least expect it…in Summer’s End.

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

A Better Man: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny:

Catastrophic spring flooding, blistering attacks in the media, and a mysterious disappearance greet Chief Inspector Armand Gamache as he returns to the Sûreté du Québec in the latest novel by #1 New York Times bestselling author Louise Penny.

It’s Gamache’s first day back as head of the homicide department, a job he temporarily shares with his previous second-in-command, Jean-Guy Beauvoir. Flood waters are rising across the province. In the middle of the turmoil a father approaches Gamache, pleading for help in finding his daughter.

As crisis piles upon crisis, Gamache tries to hold off the encroaching chaos, and realizes the search for Vivienne Godin should be abandoned. But with a daughter of his own, he finds himself developing a profound, and perhaps unwise, empathy for her distraught father.

Increasingly hounded by the question, how would you feel…, he resumes the search.

As the rivers rise, and the social media onslaught against Gamache becomes crueler, a body is discovered. And in the tumult, mistakes are made.

In the next novel in this “constantly surprising series that deepens and darkens as it evolves” (New York Times Book Review), Gamache must face a horrific possibility, and a burning question.

What would you do if your child’s killer walked free?

Contraband by Stuart Woods:

Stone Barrington is caught in the web of a national smuggling operation in the latest action-packed thriller from the #1 New York Times bestselling author.

Stone Barrington is getting some much-needed rest and relaxation in the Florida sun when trouble falls from the sky–literally. Intrigued by the suspicious circumstances surrounding this event, Stone joins forces with a sharp-witted and alluring local detective to investigate. But they run into a problem: the evidence keeps disappearing.

From the laid-back Key West shores to the bustling Manhattan streets, Stone sets out to connect the dots between the crimes that seem to follow him wherever he travels. His investigations only lead to more questions, and shocking connections between old and new acquaintances. But as Stone must quickly learn, answers–and enemies–are often hiding in plain sight .

The Last Good Guy by T. Jefferson Parker:

In this electrifying new thriller from three-time Edgar Award winner and New York Times bestseller T. Jefferson Parker, Private Investigator Roland Ford hunts for a missing teenager and uncovers a dark conspiracy in his most personal case yet.

When hired by a beautiful and enigmatic woman to find her missing younger sister, private investigator Roland Ford immediately senses that the case is not what it seems. He is soon swept up in a web of lies and secrets as he searches for the teenager, and even his new client cannot be trusted. His investigation leads him to a secretive charter school, skinhead thugs, a cadre of American Nazis hidden in a desert compound, an arch-conservative celebrity evangelist–and, finally, to the girl herself. The Last Good Guy is Ford’s most challenging case to date, one that will leave him questioning everything he thought he knew about decency, honesty, and the battle between good and evil…if it doesn’t kill him first.

The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs:

“Stitched together with love, this is a story just waiting for your favorite reading chair. With her signature style and skill, Susan Wiggs delivers an intricate patchwork of old wounds and new beginnings, romance and the healing power of friendship, wrapped in a lovely little community that’s hiding a few secrets of its own.”— Lisa Wingate, New York Times Bestselling author of Before We Were Yours

The #1 New York Times bestselling author brings us her most ambitious and provocative work yet—a searing and timely novel that explores the most volatile issue of our time—domestic violence.

At the break of dawn, Caroline Shelby rolls into Oysterville, Washington, a tiny hamlet at the edge of the raging Pacific.

She’s come home.

Home to a place she thought she’d left forever, home of her heart and memories, but not her future. Ten years ago, Caroline launched a career in the glamorous fashion world of Manhattan. But her success in New York imploded on a wave of scandal and tragedy, forcing her to flee to the only safe place she knows.

And in the backseat of Caroline’s car are two children who were orphaned in a single chilling moment—five-year-old Addie and six-year-old Flick. She’s now their legal guardian—a role she’s not sure she’s ready for.

But the Oysterville she left behind has changed. Her siblings have their own complicated lives and her aging parents are hoping to pass on their thriving seafood restaurant to the next generation. And there’s Will Jensen, a decorated Navy SEAL who’s also returned home after being wounded overseas. Will and Caroline were forever friends as children, with the promise of something more . . . until he fell in love with Sierra, Caroline’s best friend and the most beautiful girl in town. With her modeling jobs drying up, Sierra, too, is on the cusp of reinventing herself.

Caroline returns to her favorite place: the sewing shop owned by Mrs. Lindy Bloom, the woman who inspired her and taught her to sew. There she discovers that even in an idyllic beach town, there are women living with the deepest of secrets. Thus begins the Oysterville Sewing Circle—where women can join forces to support each other through the troubles they keep hidden.

Yet just as Caroline regains her creativity and fighting spirit, and the children begin to heal from their loss, an unexpected challenge tests her courage and her heart. This time, though, Caroline is not going to run away. She’s going to stand and fight for everything—and everyone—she loves

Tidelands by Philipa Gregory:

The #1 New York Times bestselling author and “one of the great storytellers of our time” (San Francisco Book Review) turns from the glamour of the royal courts to tell the story of an ordinary woman, Alinor, who cannot bear to conform to the life that lies before her.

Midsummer’s Eve, 1648, England is in the grip of a civil war between renegade king and rebellious parliament. The struggle reaches every corner of the kingdom, even the remote tidelands —the marshy landscape of the south coast.

Alinor, a descendant of wisewomen, trapped in poverty and superstition, waits in the graveyard under the full moon for a ghost who will declare her free from her abusive husband. Instead, she meets James, a young man on the run, and shows him the secret ways across the treacherous marsh, not knowing that she is leading disaster into the heart of her life.

Suspected of possessing dark secrets in superstitious times, Alinor’s ambition and determination mark her out from her neighbors. This is the time of witch mania, and Alinor, a woman without a husband, skilled with herbs, suddenly enriched, arouses envy in her rivals and fear among the villagers, who are ready to take lethal action into their own hands.

It is dangerous for a woman to be different.

Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive or the RB Digital app, to check out on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers September 1, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week ending September 1, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein:

An insightful Lab-terrier mix helps his owner, a struggling race car driver.

THE BITTERROOTS by C.J. Box:

The fourth book in the Cassie Dewell series. The black sheep of an influential family is accused of assault.

BLOOD TRUTH by J.R. Ward:

The fourth book in the Black Dagger Legacy series.

CHANCES ARE …by Richard Russo:

Three men in their 60s who met in college reunite on Martha’s Vineyard, where mysterious events occurred in 1971.

CONTRABAND by Stuart Woods:

The 50th book in the Stone Barrington series. Crimes come into focus in Key West and Manhattan.

DANGEROUS MAN by Robert Crais:

Elvis Cole and Joe Pike get more than they bargained for when they investigate the abduction of a bank teller.

EVVIE DRAKE STARTS OVER by Linda Holmes:

In a seaside town in Maine, a former Major League pitcher and a grieving widow assess their pasts.

INLAND by Téa Obreht:

The lives of a frontierswoman and a former outlaw intersect in the unforgiving climate of the Arizona Territory in 1893.

THE INN by James Patterson and Candice Fox:

A former Boston police detective who is now an innkeeper must shield a seaside town from a crew of criminals.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

NEW GIRL by Daniel Silva:

Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter is kidnapped.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci:

A World War II veteran on parole must find the real killer in a small town or face going back to jail.

OUTFOX by Sandra Brown:

F.B.I. Agent Drex Easton has a hunch that the conman Weston Graham is also a serial killer.

SUMMER OF ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand:

The Levin family undergoes dramatic events with a son in Vietnam, a daughter in protests and dark secrets hiding beneath the surface.

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris:

A concentration camp detainee tasked with permanently marking fellow prisoners falls in love with one of them.

THINGS YOU SAVE IN A FIRE by Katherine Center:

A Texas firefighter braves her estranged mother and the entrenched culture of a Boston firehouse

TURN OF THE KEY by Ruth Ware:

A nanny working in a technology-laden house in Scotland goes to jail when one of the children dies.

THE WARNING by James Patterson and Robison Wells:

A small Southern town is not the same after a power-plant accident.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

NON-FICTION:.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST by Ibram X. Kendi:

A primer for creating a more just and equitable society through identifying and opposing racism.

KOCHLAND by Christopher Leonard:

How Koch Industries consolidated power and affected important facets of modern life over the last half-century.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

THE RANGE by David Epstein:

An argument for how generalists excel more than specialists, especially in complex and unpredictable fields.

SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari:

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

THE SOURCE OF SELF-REGARD by Toni Morrison:

A collection of essays and speeches written over four decades, including a eulogy for James Baldwin and the author’s Nobel lecture.

TEXAS FLOOD by Alan Paul and Andy Aledort:

A biography of Stevie Ray Vaughan, the influential blues guitarist and musician who died in a helicopter crash in 1990 at the age of 35.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

WHITE FRAGILITY by Robin DiAngelo:

Historical and cultural analyses on what causes defensive moves by white people and how this inhibits cross-racial dialogue.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening August 23, 2019

Hi everyone, here in Library Land we’ve been discussing the fact that the Freegal Music Service we’ve offered for the last several years isn’t widely used. With that in mind, I’m going to mix up the format of the weekly music posting and suggest five library materials, a mix of books, music CDs and DVDs, that focus on music and musicians.

And I will continue to include a weekly section of suggested videos as those seem to be quite popular!

Also of note, if you’d like to request a title, book, CD or DVD, be held for you at the library simply click on the photo of the item and you’ll be re-directed to online catalog, StarCat, where you can enter your library card and PIN to request desired item.

This week our five music recommendation are:

Dust & Grooves Adventures In Record Collection by Elion Paz (Format: Print Book):


A photographic look into the world of vinyl record collectors—including Questlove—in the most intimate of environments—their record rooms.

Compelling photographic essays from photographer Eilon Paz are paired with in-depth and insightful interviews to illustrate what motivates these collectors to keep digging for more records. The reader gets an up close and personal look at a variety of well-known vinyl champions, including Gilles Peterson and King Britt, as well as a glimpse into the collections of known and unknown DJs, producers, record dealers, and everyday enthusiasts. Driven by his love for vinyl records, Paz takes us on a five-year journey unearthing the very soul of the vinyl community. – From The Publisher

Folk Jazz Trio (2011) by David Grisman (Format: Music CD):

David Grisman’s musical interests have been so varied that he is impossible to categorize stylistically, one of the reasons he has long described his playing everywhere as “Dawg Music.” This is a bit of an unusual outing, as it consists of a trio with bluegrass/folk guitarist/vocalist Jim Hurst, Grisman (mostly on mandolin), and his son Samson on bass. Hurst has previously covered Roger Rasnake’s “Cold Hard Business” and this version features his strong vocal and potent solos all around. The deliberate Latin-flavored “Vaya con Dios” was a hit for Les Paul & Mary Ford and also covered by Mel Tormé, Nat King Cole, and numerous vocalists, though the trio tackles it as an intimate instrumental. “Sally Ann” is a decades-old traditional favorite of bluegrass pickers; the trio’s interpretation seems effortless and Samson Grisman does a splendid job playing with the two veterans. Hurst and Grisman share the vocals in the traditional sorrowful country ballad “Mary of the Wild Moor,” while Samson take the lead vocal in a potent version of the late John Hartford’s “I Wish We Had Our Time Again.” Stephen Foster’s “Beautiful Dreamer” is one of his best-loved songs; Grisman’s shimmering mandolin lead stands out in this performance. The rest of the CD is equally strong, and the only shortcoming of the album is the omission of composer credits, as both musicians and fans may want to seek out earlier recordings of tunes unfamiliar to them for comparison. Highly recommended. Ken Dryden, AllMusic

From Dust To Dreams (Format: DVD):

The opening-night gala at the Smith Center for Performing Arts in Las Vegas features Joshua Bell, John Fogerty, Merle Haggard, Emmylou Harris, Jennifer Hudson, Carole King, Martina McBride, Pat Monahan, Willie Nelson, Arturo Sandoval, and Mavis Staples. Hosted by Neil Patrick Harris, the lineup includes “A Song for You” by McBride and Monahan, “You’ve Got a Friend” by King and Staples, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” by Hudson, McBride, and King, and “Pancho & Lefty” by Nelson and Haggard. Jeff Gemmill Synopsis for AllMusic

Complete List of Musical Guests: Jennifer Hudson, John Fogerty, Pat Monahan, Carole King, Martina McBride, Mavis Staples, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Emmylou Harris, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Montego Glower, Cheyenne Jackson, Larua Osnes, Sherrie Rene Scott, Benjamin Walker, Marcelo Gomes, Luciana Paris, Joshua Bell & Arturo Sandoval.

The Rolling Stones Edited by Reuel Golden (Format: Print Book):

This is what we used to call a coffee table book! It is about a third larger than an album cover and somewhat weighty and it features more than 500 pages of beautiful photos of the Rolling Stones. The first half of the book shows the Stones in the sixties and the second half offers photos from 1978 to 2015. The sixties photos not only show the Stones but offer glimpses of that dramatic place in time that was the 1960s. As this is a heft book, weighing in at about 14 pounds – you might want to request it so you can pick it up at the Circulation Desk!

Here is the official description of the book: The kind of fame and success The Rolling Stones have achieved in their 50-years and counting career is without parallel; their most famous riffs and catchiest lyrics are indelibly engraved in our collective memory. With their bluesy rock ‘n’ roll and mesmerizing off and onstage presence, the Stones redefined the music of the 1960s and 1970s and paved the way for rock as we know it today. They also set the standard for how a rock band should look and behave. Produced in close collaboration with the band, this book charts the Stones’ remarkable history and outrageously cool lifestyle in over 500 pages of photographs and illustrations, many previously unseen, and gathered from archives all over the world. Unprecedented access to the Rolling Stones’ own archives in New York and London adds an equally extraordinary, more private side to their story. For Mick, Keith, Charlie and Ronnie this is their official photographic record.

Features: Over 500 pages of incredible images from some of the world’s greatest photographers, including David Bailey, Peter Beard, Cecil Beaton, Bob Bonis, Anton Corbijn, Annie Leibovitz, Gered Mankowitz, Helmut Newton, Bent Rej, and Norman Parkinson.

A foreword written by President Bill Clinton

Three new essays from award-winning writers David Dalton, Waldemar Januszczak, and Luc Sante
Appendix including Stones in the media, a Stones timeline, a discography, and photographers’ biographies

Whistle Down The Wind (2018) by Joan Baez (Music CD):

Joan Baez has as estimable a legacy as anyone who emerged in American folk music from 1960 onward, but sometimes a powerful legacy can be as much a burden as an asset. While she’s enjoyed a long and eclectic career that’s spanned six decades, to many Baez will always be the earnest, crystal-voiced activist she was in the early to mid-’60s, and much of her career since has been devoted to honoring what was good about her formative years without being chained to her past. Whistle Down the Wind, released in 2018 as Baez was beginning what she pledged would be her last major concert tour, is the work of an autumnal Joan Baez, but also one who hasn’t turned her back on her music or her principles. The glorious soprano notes of Baez’s glory days are clearly out of reach for her here, but her phrasing remains thoughtful and emotionally strong, and if her voice isn’t quite what it once was, it’s still lovely and full of authority. The mood of these ten songs (which include compositions by Tom Waits, Josh Ritter, Anohni, and Mary Chapin Carpenter) is generally downbeat and sometimes doleful, but Baez fills her performances with strength and commitment that are impressive in their quiet defiance. In songs like “The President Sang Amazing Grace” and “I Wish the Wars Were All Over,” Baez makes clear she’s still committed to a better world without attaching herself to polemics that will be dated in ten years. And the production by Joe Henry is superb, matching Baez’s vocals with subtle but simpatico accompaniment from a studio band that knows how to shine while making room for the protagonist. Whistle Down the Wind is a portrait of an artist who, at the age of 77, has not given up on her muse or her ideals, and while it’s subtle, it’s also a deeply moving piece of work that demands attention. Mark Deming, AllMusic

Videos of the Week:

Cross Road Blues by Robert Johnson

Elves Revolt from the Six Million Dollar Man Christmas Adventures LP

It’s The Real Thing by The Raymonde Orchestra

Piano Cocktails by Buddy Cole

Needle In A Haystack by The Velvelettes

East Tennessee Blues by The Dave Grisman Folk Jazz Trio

Swang Thing by The Dave Grisman Folk Jazz Trio

Our Time – Cheyenne Jackson, Sherie Rene Scott, Ben Walker, Laura Osnes, & Montego Glover

The Smith Center for the Performing Arts – Opening Night Gala – March 10, 2012 Preview

The Last Time by The Rolling Stones

Not Fade Away by The Rolling Stones

Ruby Tuesday by The Rolling Stones

Another World by Joan Baez

Whistle Down The Wind by Joan Baez

Gone Gone Gone by Carl Perkins

This Train by Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash & Jerry Lee Lewis

You Never Can Tell by Bruce Springsteen

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

REFERENCES:

Print References

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Online References

AllMusic: https://www.allmusic.com/

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS: OverDrive & RBDigital:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive and/or the RBDigital app, to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Newly Added Media Items August 2019

Hi everyone, by request, here is the first monthly post listing the new media items, audiobooks on CD, DVDs and music CDs, that have been added to the library’s collection in the last month.

New items may be requested in person at the library, by calling the library at 607-936-3713 or via the online catalog – StarCat:

New Audiobooks on CD:

CHANCES ARE written by Richard Russo & read by Fred Sanders:
One beautiful September day, three sixty-six-year old men convene on Martha’s Vineyard, friends ever since meeting in college circa the sixties. They couldn’t have been more different then, or even today, Lincoln’s a commercial real estate broker, Teddy a tiny-press publisher, and Mickey, a musician beyond his rockin’ age. But each man holds his own secrets, in addition to the monumental mystery that none of them has ever stopped puzzling over since a Memorial Day weekend right here on the Vineyard in 1971. Now, forty-four years later, as this new weekend unfolds, three lives and that of a significant other are displayed in their entirety while the distant past confounds the present like a relentless squall of surprise and discovery.

THE LAGER QUEEN OF MINNESOTA Written by J. Ryan Stradal & read by Judith Ivey:
Edith Magnusson’s rhubarb pies are famous in the Twin Cities, they were named the third-best in the state, and St. Anthony-Waterside Nursing Home has quickly becomes the hottest dinner ticket in town. Still, she lays awake wondering how her life might have been different if her father hadn’t left their family farm to her sister Helen, a decision that split their family in two.

THE NICKEL BOYS written by Colson Whitehead & read by JD Jackson:
As the Civil Rights movement begins to reach the black enclave of Frenchtown in segregated Tallahassee, Elwood Curtis takes the words of Dr. Martin Luther King to heart: He is ‘as good as anyone’, Abandoned by his parents, but kept on the straight and narrow by his grandmother, Elwood is about to enroll in the local black college. But for a black boy in the Jim Crow South in the early 1960s, one innocent mistake is enough to destroy the future. Elwood is sentenced to a juvenile reformatory whose mission statement says it provides ‘physical, intellectual and moral training’ so the delinquent boys in their charge can become ‘honorable and honest men’. In reality, The Nickel Academy is a grotesque chamber of horrors, where the sadistic staff beats and sexually abuses the students, corrupt officials and locals steal food and supplies, and any boy who resists is likely to disappear ‘out back’.

ONE GOOD DEED
Written by David Baldacci & read by Edoardo Ballerini:
It’s 1949. When war veteran Aloysius Archer is released from Carderock Prison, he is sent to Poca City on parole with a short list of do’s and a much longer list of don’ts: do report regularly to his parole officer, don’t go to bars, certainly don’t drink alcohol, do get a job–and don’t ever associate with loose women.

SOMEONE WE KNOW
Written by Shari Lapena & read by Kirsten Potter:
In a quiet, leafy suburb in upstate New York, a teenager has been sneaking into houses, and into the owners’ computers as well, learning their secrets, and maybe sharing some of them, too. Who is he, and what might he have uncovered? As whispers start to circulate, suspicion mounts. And when a woman down the street is found murdered, the tension reaches the breaking point. Who killed her? Who knows more than they’re telling? And how far will all these very nice people go to protect their little secrets? In this neighborhood, it’s not just the husbands and wives who play games. Here, everyone in the family has something to hide.

SOPHIA, PRINCESS AMONG BEASTS
Written by James Patterson & Emily Raymond and read by Gemma Dawson:
A princess who has lost her mother and father finds herself in a terrifying world that urgently needs a queen. She is smart, beautiful, and accomplished, a beloved princess devoted to the people and to reading books. The kingdom is hers, until she is plunged into a nightmarish realm populated by the awful beasts she read about as a child. The beasts are real. And so is the great army marching on her castle. The people look to Sophia for protection. They will all perish unless she can unlock an ancient secret as profound as life and death itself.

UNDER CURRENTS written by Nora Roberts and read by January LaVoy:
Within the walls of a tasteful, perfectly kept house in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, young Zane Bigelow feels like a prisoner of war. Strangers-and even Zane’s own aunt across the lake-see his parents as a successful surgeon and his stylish wife, making appearances at their children’s ballet recitals and baseball games. Zane and his sister know the truth: There is something terribly wrong. As his father’s violent, controlling rages-and his mother’s complicity-become more and more oppressive, Zane counts the years, months, days until he can escape. He looks out for little Britt. In fear for his very life, he plays along with the insidious lie that everything is fine, while scribbling his real thoughts in a secret journal he must carefully hide away.

NEW DOWNLOADABLE AUDIOBOOKS:
(Available through the Digital Catalog & via the Libby App)
Backlash: A by Brad Thor
The Happiness Project: Or, Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun by Gretchen Rubin,
Heartbeat by Sharon Creech
Lady in the Lake: A Novel by Laura Lippman
Little Women: Little Women Series, Book 1 by Louisa May Alcott
A Nearly Normal Family: A Novel by M.T. Edvardsson
The New Girl: A Novel by Daniel Silva
The Nickel Boys: A Novel by Colson Whitehea
On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous: A Novel by Ocean Vuon
Paris, 7 A.M.by Liza Wieland
Sarum: The Novel of England by Edward Rutherfurd
Say No to the Duke: The Wildes of Lindow Castle by Eloisa James
Shamed: Kate Burkholder Series, Book 11 by Linda Castillo
Sophia, Princess among Beasts by James Patterson
Tangled by Emma Chase
Temper by Layne Fargo
To Live and Die in Dixie by Mary Kay Andrews
Under Currents: A Novel by Nora Roberts
The Wedding Party by Jasmine Guillory

New CDs:

BLUE ROSES by Runaway June
HOTEL LAST RESORT by Violent Femmes
LORD HELP ME FIND MY WAY by The Clinch Mountain Boys & Ralph Stanley II
MADAME X by Madonna
THE TRAVELER by Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band
WEATHER by Tycho
WOODSTOCK: BACK TO THE GARDEN by Various Artists

New DVDs:

3 FACES (2019): Director Panahi begins with a smartphone video shot by a young woman who announces to the camera that her parents haveforbidden her from realizing her dream of acting and then, by all appearances, takes her own life. The recipient of the video, Behnaz Jafari, as herself, asks Panahi, as himself, to drive her to the woman’s tiny home village near the Turkish border to investigate. Dialouge in Persian and Azerbaijani.

ADAM-12: SEASON 1 (1968): Still mourning the death of his former partner, Officer Pete Malloy is teamed with rookie Officer Jim Reed. Together they serve and protect the City of Angels as Adam-12, their unit’s radio call number. Includes all 26 episodes.

AFTER (2019): The story follows Tessa, a dedicated student, dutiful daughter, and loyal girlfriend to her high school sweetheart, as she enters her first semester in college. Armed with grand ambitions for her future, her guarded world opens up when she meets the dark and mysterious Hardin Scott, a magnetic, brooding rebel who makes her question all she thought she knew about herself and what she wants out of life.

ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL (2019): When Alita awakens with no memory in a future world she does not recognize, she is taken in by Ido, a compassionate doctor who realizes that somewhere in this abandoned cyborg shell is the heart and soul of a young woman. And the doctor Ido also tries to shield Alita from her mysterious history while her street-smart new friend Hugo offers instead to help trigger her memories. But it is when the deadly and corrupt forces that run the city come after Alita that she discovers a clue to her past.

THE APOLLO CHRONICLES (2019): Participants, family members, historians, and experts paint a rich portrait of one of the most fascinating achievements in history. It is a story about the people, the events, and the obstacles that comprised one of humanities’ greatest triumphs.

THE BEST OF ENEMIES (2019): Based on a true story, the film centers on the unlikely relationship between Ann Atwater, an outspoken civil rights activist, and C.P. Ellis, a local Ku Klux Klan leader, who reluctantly co-chaired a community summit, battling over the desegregation of schools in Durham, North Carolina, during the racially charged summer of 1971. The incredible events that unfolded would change Durham and the lives of Atwater and Ellis forever.

BOJACK HORSEMAN SEASONS 1 & 2 (2019): The title character was the star of the hit TV show Horsin’ Around in the 1990s. Now he’s a has-been, living in Hollywood, grousing about everything, and wearing multicolored sweaters. Animated.

BREAKTHROUGH (2019): Based on the inspirational true story of one mother’s unfaltering love in the face of impossible odds. When Joyce Smith’s adopted son John falls through an icy Missouri lake, all hope seems lost. But as John lies lifeless, Joyce refuses to give up. Her steadfast belief inspires those around her to continue to pray for John’s recovery, even in the face of every case history and scientific prediction. A reminder that faith and love can create a mountain of hope, and sometimes even a miracle.

HELLBOY (2019): The legendary half-demon superhero is called to the countryside to battle a trio of rampaging giants. There he discovers the Blood Queen, Nimue, a resurrected ancient sorceress thirsting to avenge a past betrayal. Suddenly caught in a clash between the supernatural and the human, Hellboy is now hellbent on stopping Nimue without triggering the end of the world.

HIGH LIFE (2019): Monte and his baby daughter are the last survivors of a damned and dangerous mission to deep space. The crew, death row inmates led by a doctor with sinister motives, has vanished. As the mystery of what happened onboard the ship is unraveled, father and daughter must rely on each other to survive as they hurtle toward the oblivion of a black hole.

INNOCENT(2018): After David Collins serves seven years of a life sentence for murdering his wife, the court decides he was wrongfully convicted. That’s the good news. The bad news is, his life is shattered. Everyone in his small, seaside village thinks he’s guilty, including his children. How can he win them back from their guardian, his dead wife’s sister who loves the children as much as she detests David? And who killed his wife?

THE INTRUDER (2019): When a young married couple buys their dream house in the Napa Valley, they think they have found the perfect home to take their next steps as a family. But when the strangely attached seller continues to infiltrate their lives, they begin to suspect that he has hidden motivations beyond a quick sale.

LITTLE (2019): Jordan is a take-no-prisoners tech mogul who torments her long-suffering assistant and employees daily. She soon faces an unexpected threat to her personal life and career when she magically transforms into a thirteen-year-old version of herself.

LITTLE WOODS (2019): Ollie is barely getting by in an economically depressed fracking boomtown in North Dakota. She has left her days of illegally running prescription pills over the Canadian border behind, eyeing a potential new job that would finally break her out of the small town. But when her mother dies, she is reunited with her estranged sister Deb, who faces a mounting crisis: the combined effect of an unplanned pregnancy and a deadbeat ex.

LONG SHOT (2019): When Fred Flarsky reunites with his first crush, one of the most influential women in the world, Charlotte Field, he charms her. As she prepares to make a run for presidency, Charlotte hires Fred as her speechwriter and sparks fly.

LOST TREASURES OF THE MAYA (2019): Explorer Albert Lin ventures into the Guatemalan jungle to explore how a new high-tech treasure map is revealing tens of thousands of ancient ruins. Dozens of archaeologists head out on a voyage of discovery, exploring lost ruins for the first time in 1,500 years. What they’re finding is rewriting the history of one of the world’s most mysterious ancient civilizations.

MISSING LINK (2019): Mr. Link recruits explorer Sir Lionel Frost to help find his long-lost relatives in the fabled valley of Shangri-La. Along with adventurer Adelina Fortnight, this trio of explorers travels the world to help their new friend.

PET SEMATARY (2019): Louis Creed and his wife Rachel relocate with their two young children from Boston to rural Maine. The couple soon discovers a mysterious burial ground hidden deep in the woods near their new home. When tragedy strikes, Louis turns to his neighbor Jud Crandall, setting off a perilous of events that unleashes an unspeakable evil with horrific consequences.

THE PROFESSOR (2019): Johnny Depp delivers a wickedly funny performance as Richard, a buttoned-down college lecturer who, after learning he has six months to live, transforms into a rebellious party animal. To the shock of his wife and school chancellor, and the delight of his students, Richard leads a hilarious crusade against authority and hypocrisy in this dark comedy costarring Zoey Deutch.

SCARY STORIES: THE STORY OF BOOKS THAT FRIGHTENED A GENERATION (2019): Explore the history of one of the most controversial works of modern children’s literature: the bestselling teen classic Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, which scared a generation of readers and became one of the most banned books of modern times. Includes the author’s family, scholars, folklorists, artists, fans, and children’s book authors such as R.L. Stine, Q.L. Pearce, and more.

SHAZAM! (2019): Everybody has a superhero inside of them; it just takes a bit of magic to bring it out. In Billy Batson’s case, by shouting out one word, this streetwise fourteen-year-old foster kid can turn into an adult superhero, courtesy of an ancient wizard. Still a kid at heart, inside a ripped, godlike body, he revels in this adult version of himself by doing what any teen would do with superpowers: have fun with them! But he’ll need to master these powers quickly to fight the deadly forces of evil.

THE WAVE (2015/2019): The experienced geologist Kristian Eikfjord has accepted a job offer out of town. He is getting ready to move from the city of Geiranger with his family, when he and his colleagues measure small geological changes in the underground. Kristian gets worried and his worst nightmare is about to come true, when the alarm goes off and the disaster is inevitable. With less than 10 minutes to react, it becomes a race against time in order to save as many as possible including his own family.

WILDLAND (2019): Filmed over one fire season, this is a sweeping yet deeply personal account of a single wildland firefighting crew as they struggle with fear, loyalty, dreams, and demons. What emerges is a rich story of working-class men; their exterior world, their interior lives and the fire that lies between.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Suggested Reading August 19, 2019

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles, eBooks & downloadable audio books, available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

DIGITAL CATALOG SUGGESTIONS:

Killing with Confetti by Peter Lovesey (Format: eBook):

Peter Lovesey, MWA Grand Master and titan of the English detective novel, returns readers to Bath with the eighteenth mystery in his critically acclaimed Peter Diamond series.

As a New Year begins in Bath, Ben Brace proposes to his long-term girlfriend, Caroline, the daughter of notorious crime baron Joe Irving, who is coming to the end of a prison sentence. The problem is that Ben’s father, George, is the Deputy Chief Constable. A more uncomfortable set of in-laws would be hard to imagine. But mothers and sons are a formidable force: a wedding in the Abbey and reception in the Roman Baths are arranged before the career-obsessed DCC can step in.

Peter Diamond, Bath’s head of CID, is appalled to be put in charge of security on the day. Ordered to be discreet, he packs a gun and a guest list in his best suit and must somehow cope with potential killers, gang rivals, warring parents, bossy photographers and straying bridesmaids. The laid-back Joe Irving seems oblivious to the danger he is in from rival gang leaders, while Brace can’t wait for the day to end. Will the photo session be a literal shoot? Will Joe Irving’s speech as father of the bride be his last words? Can Diamond pull off a miracle, avert a tragedy and send the happy couple on their honeymoon?

—–

The Memory of Love by Aminatta Forna (Format: eBook):

“[A] luminous tale of passion and betrayal” set in the post-colonial and civil war eras of Sierra Leone (The New York Times).

Winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book

As a decade of civil war and political unrest comes to a devastating close, three men must reconcile themselves to their own fate and the fate of their broken nation. For Elias Cole, this means reflecting on his time as a young scholar in 1969 and the affair that defined his life. For Adrian Lockheart, it means listening to Elias’s tale and following his own heart into a heated romance. For Elias’s doctor, Kai Mansaray, it’s desperately battling his nightmares by trying to heal his patients.

As each man’s story becomes inexorably bound with the others’, they discover that they are connected not only by their shared heritage, pain, and shame, but also by one remarkable woman.

The Memory of Love is a beautiful and ambitious exploration of the influence history can have on generations, and the shared cultural burdens that each of us inevitably face.

“A soft-spoken story of brutality and endurance set in postwar Sierra Leone . . . Tragedy and its aftermath are affectingly, memorably evoked in this multistranded narrative from a significant talent.” —Kirkus Reviews

—–

One Good Deed read by David Baldacci and read by Edoardo Ballerini (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

The #1 New York Times bestselling author David Baldacci introduces an unforgettable new character: Archer, a straight-talking former World War II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

It’s 1949. When war veteran Aloysius Archer is released from Carderock Prison, he is sent to Poca City on parole with a short list of do’s and a much longer list of don’ts: do report regularly to his parole officer, don’t go to bars, certainly don’t drink alcohol, do get a job-and don’t ever associate with loose women.

The small town quickly proves more complicated and dangerous than Archer’s years serving in the war or his time in jail. Within a single night, his search for gainful employment-and a stiff drink-leads him to a local bar, where he is hired for what seems like a simple job: to collect a debt owed to a powerful local businessman, Hank Pittleman.

Soon Archer discovers that recovering the debt won’t be so easy. The indebted man has a furious grudge against Hank and refuses to pay; Hank’s clever mistress has her own designs on Archer; and both Hank and Archer’s stern parole officer, Miss Crabtree, are keeping a sharp eye on him.

When a murder takes place right under Archer’s nose, police suspicions rise against the ex-convict, and Archer realizes that the crime could send him right back to prison . . . if he doesn’t use every skill in his arsenal to track down the real killer.

—–

Seeing Red by Dana Dratch (Format: eBook):

If it wasn’t for art thieves, spies and killers, Alex Vlodnachek’s life would be bliss.

Her freelance career is catching fire. Her relationship with B&B owner Ian Sterling is flirty and fun. She’s even attending a glittering cocktail party at his sprawling Victorian inn.

But, to this ex-reporter, something seems “off.” And it’s not the canapés. When Ian’s father vanishes, the enigmatic innkeeper asks for her discretion. And her assistance.

Meanwhile, Alex is having the opposite problem at her tiny bungalow: People keep piling in uninvited. Including a mysterious intruder found sleeping in her kitchen. Her grandmother, Baba, who shows up “to help”—with Alex’s own mother hot on her heels.

When the intrepid redhead discovers a body in the B&B’s basement and a “reproduction” Renoir in the library, she begins to suspect that Ian is more than just a simple hotel owner.

With editor pal Trip, brother Nick, and rescue-pup Lucy riding shotgun, Alex scrambles to stay one step ahead of disaster—and some very nasty characters.

Can she find the missing man before it’s too late? Or will Alex be the next one to disappear?

—–

The Summer of Ellen by Agnete Friis (Format: eBook):

Agnete Friis’s lyrical, evocative work of psychological suspense weaves together two periods in one man’s life to explore obsession, toxic masculinity, and the tricks we play on our own memory.

Jacob, a middle-aged architect living in Copenhagen, is in the alcohol-soaked throes of a bitter divorce when he receives an unexpected call from his great-uncle Anton. In his nineties and still living with his brother on their rural Jutland farm—a place Jacob hasn’t visited since the summer of 1978—Anton remains haunted by a single question: What happened to Ellen?

To find out, Jacob must return to the farm and confront what took place that summer—one defined by his teenage obsession with Ellen, a beautiful young hippie from the local commune, and the unsolved disappearance of a local girl. In revisiting old friends and rivals, Jacob discovers the tragedies that have haunted him for over forty years were not what they seemed.
—–

PRINT BOOK SUGGESTIONS:

1919 by Eve L. Ewing:

O Magazine Best Books by Women of Summer 2019
Chicago Tribune 25 hot books of summer 2019
The Millions Must-Read Poetry of June 2019
LitHub Most Anticipated Reads of Summer 2019
Buzzfeed 29 Summer Books To Get Excited About
Chicago Review of Books Best New Books of June 2019

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, the most intense of the riots comprising the nation’s Red Summer, has shaped the last century but is not widely discussed. In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing explores the story of this event—which lasted eight days and resulted in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries—through poems recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city. Ewing uses speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to recast history, and illuminates the thin line between the past and the present.

—–

Death In A Budapest Butterfly by Julia Buckley:

Hana Keller serves up European-style cakes and teas in her family-owned tea house, but when a customer keels over from a poisoned cuppa, Hana and her tea-leaf reading grandmother will have to help catch a killer in the first Hungarian Tea House Mystery from Julia Buckley.

Hana Keller and her family run Maggie’s Tea House, an establishment heavily influenced by the family’s Hungarian heritage and specializing in a European-style traditional tea service. But one of the shop’s largest draws is Hana’s eccentric grandmother, Juliana, renowned for her ability to read the future in the leaves at the bottom of customers’ cups. Lately, however, her readings have become alarmingly ominous and seemingly related to old Hungarian legends…

When a guest is poisoned at a tea event, Juliana’s dire predictions appear to have come true. Things are brought to a boil when Hana’s beloved Anna Weatherley butterfly teacup becomes the center of the murder investigation as it carried the poisoned tea. The cup is claimed as evidence by a handsome police detective, and the pretty Tea House is suddenly endangered. Hana and her family must catch the killer to save their business and bring the beautiful Budapest Butterfly back home where it belongs.

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Inland: A Novel by Téa Obreht:

The New York Times bestselling author of The Tiger’s Wife returns with “a bracingly epic and imaginatively mythic journey across the American West” (Entertainment Weekly).

In the lawless, drought-ridden lands of the Arizona Territory in 1893, two extraordinary lives unfold. Nora is an unflinching frontierswoman awaiting the return of the men in her life—her husband, who has gone in search of water for the parched household, and her elder sons, who have vanished after an explosive argument. Nora is biding her time with her youngest son, who is convinced that a mysterious beast is stalking the land around their home.

Meanwhile, Lurie is a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts. He sees lost souls who want something from him, and he finds reprieve from their longing in an unexpected relationship that inspires a momentous expedition across the West. The way in which Lurie’s death-defying trek at last intersects with Nora’s plight is the surprise and suspense of this brilliant novel.

Mythical, lyrical, and sweeping in scope, Inland is grounded in true but little-known history. It showcases all of Téa Obreht’s talents as a writer, as she subverts and reimagines the myths of the American West, making them entirely—and unforgettably—her own.

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In The Shadows of Spindrift House by Mira Grant:

For Harlowe Upton-Jones, life has never been a straight line. Shipped off to live with her paternal grandparents after a mysterious cult killed her mother and father, she has grown up chasing the question behind the curve, becoming part of a tight-knit teen detective agency. But “teen” is a limited time offer, and when her friends start looking for adult professions, it’s up to Harlowe to find them one last case so that they can go out in a blaze of glory.

Welcome to Spindrift House. The stories and legends surrounding the decrepit property are countless and contradictory, but one thing is clear: there are people willing to pay a great deal to determine the legal ownership of the house. When Harlowe and her friends agree to investigate the mystery behind the manor, they do so on the assumption that they’ll be going down in history as the ones who determined who built Spindrift House – and why.

The house has secrets. They have the skills. They have a plan. They have everything they need to solve the mystery. Everything they need except for time. Because Spindrift House keeps its secrets for a reason, and it has no intention of letting them go. Nature abhors a straight line. Here’s where the story bends.

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Rocket To The Morgue by Anthony Boucher:

Legendary science fiction author Fowler Faulkes may be dead, but his creation, the iconic Dr. Derringer, lives on in popular culture. Or, at least, the character would live on if not for Faulkes’s predatory and greedy heir Hilary, who, during his time as the inflexible guardian of the estate, has created countless enemies in the relatively small community of writers of the genre. So when he is stabbed nearly to death in a room with only one door, which nobody was seen entering or exiting, Foulkes suspects a writer. Fearing that the assailant will return, he asks for police protection, and when more potentially-fatal encounters follow, it becomes clear to Detective Terry Marshall and his assistant, the inquisitive nun, Sister Ursula, that death awaits Mr. Foulkes around every corner. Now, they’ll have to work overtime to thwart the would-be murderer―a task that requires a deep dive into the strange, idiosyncratic world of science fiction in its early days.

With characters based heavily on Anthony Boucher’s friends at the Manana Literary Society, including Robert Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and Jack Parsons, Rocket to the Morgue is both a classic locked room mystery and an enduring portrait of a real-life writing community. Reprinted for the first time in over thirty years, the book is a must-read for fans of mysteries and science fiction alike.

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Book descriptions are provided by the publishers unless otherwise specified.

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Have a great week!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD, etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

ABOUT LIBRARY APPS:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive or the RB Digital app, to check out on-demand magazines, from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at 607-936-3713 and one of our tech coaches will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

New York Times Bestsellers August 25, 2019

Hi everyone, here are the top New York Times fiction and non-fiction bestsellers for the week that ends August 25, 2019.

(Click on the book covers to read a summary of each plot and to request the books of your choice.)

FICTION:

ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein:

An insightful Lab-terrier mix helps his owner, a struggling race car driver.

ASK AGAIN, YES by Mary Beth Keane:

The lives of neighboring families in a New York City suburb intertwine over four decades.

BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate:

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

BELOVED by Toni Morrison:

Winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. A former slave living in Ohio is haunted by events at the Kentucky plantation from which she escaped 18 years ago.

CHANCES ARE …by Richard Russo:

Three men in their 60s who met in college reunite on Martha’s Vineyard, where mysterious events occurred in 1971.

CITY OF GIRLS by Elizabeth Gilbert:

An 89-year-old Vivian Morris looks back at the direction her life took when she entered the 1940s New York theater scene.

DANGEROUS MAN by Robert Crais:

Elvis Cole and Joe Pike get more than they bargained for when they investigate the abduction of a bank teller.

EVVIE DRAKE STARTS OVER by Linda Holmes:

In a seaside town in Maine, a former Major League pitcher and a grieving widow assess their pasts.

THE INN by James Patterson and Candice Fox:

A former Boston police detective who is now an innkeeper must shield a seaside town from a crew of criminals.

LAST HOUSE GUEST by Megan Miranda:

Avery Greer must fight the clock to clear her name and uncover her friend’s real killer.

LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng:

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

NEW GIRL by Daniel Silva:

Gabriel Allon, the chief of Israeli intelligence, partners with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, whose daughter is kidnapped.

NICKEL BOYS by Colson Whitehead:

Two boys respond to horrors at a Jim Crow-era reform school in ways that impact them decades later.

ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci:

A World War II veteran on parole must find the real killer in a small town or face going back to jail.

OUTFOX by Sandra Brown:

F.B.I. Agent Drex Easton has a hunch that the conman Weston Graham is also a serial killer.

THE RECKONING by John Grisham:

A decorated World War II veteran shoots and kills a pastor inside a Mississippi church.

SUMMER OF ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand:

The Levin family undergoes dramatic events with a son in Vietnam, a daughter in protests and dark secrets hiding beneath the surface.

TURN OF THE KEY by Ruth Ware:

A nanny working in a technology-laden house in Scotland goes to jail when one of the children dies.

UNDER CURRENTS by Nora Roberts:

Echoes of a violent childhood reverberate for Zane Bigelow when he starts a new kind of family in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains.

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens:

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

NON-FICTION:.

BAD BLOOD by John Carreyrou:

The rise and fall of the biotech startup Theranos.

BECOMING by Michelle Obama:

The former first lady describes her journey from the South Side of Chicago to the White House, and how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates:

A meditation on race in America.

THE BODY KEEPS THE SCORE by Bessel van der Kolk:

How trauma affects the body and mind, and innovative treatments for recovery.

BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah:

A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

CALYPSO by David Sedaris:

A collection of comedic stories on mortality, middle age and a beach house dubbed the Sea Section.

EDUCATED by Tara Westover:

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

JUSTICE ON TRIAL by Mollie Hemingway and Carrie Severino:

The conservative authors give their take on the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson:

A civil rights lawyer and MacArthur grant recipient’s memoir of his decades of work to free innocent people condemned to death.

MAYBE YOU SHOULD TALK TO SOMEONE by Lori Gottlieb:

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.

THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates:

The philanthropist shares stories of empowering women to improve society.

THE PIONEERS by David McCullough:

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian tells the story of the settling of the Northwest Territory through five main characters.

THE RANGE by David Epstein:

An argument for how generalists excel more than specialists, especially in complex and unpredictable fields.

SECOND MOUNTAIN by David Brooks:

A New York Times Op-Ed columnist espouses having an outward focus to attain a meaningful life.

THE SOURCE OF SELF-REGARD by Toni Morrison:

A collection of essays and speeches written over four decades, including a eulogy for James Baldwin and the author’s Nobel lecture.

THREE WOMEN by Lisa Taddeo:

The inequality of female desire is explored through the sex lives of a homemaker, a high school student and a restaurant owner.

UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS by Mark R. Levin:

The conservative commentator and radio host makes his case that the press is aligned with political ideology.

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSL

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.