November is Native American Heritage Month Focus On Non-Fiction

This is week 2 of our November Did You Know postings.

As mentioned last week, November is Native American Heritage month; last week our suggested reading titles were all works of fiction. This week our focus is on non-fiction titles.

And without further ado – here they are:

#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women Edited by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale:

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #NotYourPrincess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

The American Revolution in Indian Country: Crisis and Diversity in Native American Communities by Colin G. Calloway:

This study presents the first broad coverage of Indian experiences in the American Revolution rather than Indian participation as allies or enemies of contending parties. Colin Calloway focuses on eight Indian communities as he explores how the Revolution often translated into war among Indians and their own struggles for independence. Drawing on British, American, Canadian and Spanish records, Calloway shows how Native Americans pursued different strategies, endured a variety of experiences, but were bequeathed a common legacy as a result of the Revolution.

Cahokia: Ancient America’s Great City on the Mississippi by Timothy R. Pauketat:

Almost a thousand years ago, a Native American city flourished along the banks of the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Filled with as many as 20,000 residents at its height, Cahokia seemingly grew out of nowhere around the year 1050, featuring scores of packed-earth mounds and a sprawling plaza the size of thirty-five football fields.

Yet by 1400 it had been abandoned.

In Cahokia, anthropologist Timothy R. Pauketat reveals the story of the city and its people as uncovered by archaeologists. What emerges is an absorbing portrait of a society capable of producing both complex celestial timepieces and disturbing acts of large-scale human sacrificean edifying narrative of prehistoric America that brings us back in touch with our deepest past.

Encyclopedia of Native American Religions by Arlene B. Hirschfelder & Paulette Molin:

Long regarded as quaint curiosities or exotic pagan rites, the religious practices of Native Americans make up a rich, enduring legacy deserving of a place among the great spiritual traditions. The volume features a foreword written by Walter R. Echo-Hawk, a senior staff attorney with the Native American Rights Fund, whose legal experience includes cases involving religious freedom and reburial rights. This volume is available in paperback for the first time.

Featuring more than 1,200 cross-referenced entries, this encyclopedia is a fascinating guide to the spiritual traditions of Native Americans in the United States and Canada, including coverage of beliefs about the afterlife, symbolism, creation myths, and vision quests; important ceremonies and dances; prominent American Indian religious figures; and events, legislation, and tribal court cases that have shaped the development of Native American religions.

Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes by Carl Waldman:

Encyclopedia of Native American Indians is a comprehensive, accessible guide to more than 150 North American Indian nations. Organized alphabetically by tribe or group, the book summarizes the historical record—such as locations, migrations, contacts with non-Indians, wars—and includes present-day tribal status. Readers will get a brief look at traditional Indian lifeways, including language, families, clothing, houses, boats, tools, arts, legends, and rituals. This revised edition features:

Important developments in Indian political issues and cultural affairs

Increased coverage of prehistoric Indians as well as Mesoamerican civilizations

Emerging casinos in the 1990s, such as Foxwoods in the Pequot reservation in Connecticut

Recent activism, such as demonstrations at Plymouth, Massachusetts and the blockade at the Oka and Kahnawake reserves near Montreal

The use of native names again by certain tribes, such as the Inuit, rather than those applied by non-Indians.

History of Native American Land Rights in Upstate New York by Cindy Amrhein:

A complex and troubled history defines the borders of upstate New York beyond the physical boundaries of its rivers and lakes. The United States and the state were often deceptive in their territory negotiations with the Iroquois Six Nations. Amidst the growing quest for more land among settlers and then fledgling Americans, the Indian nations attempted to maintain their autonomy. Yet state land continued to encroach the Six Nations. Local historian Cindy Amrhein takes a close and critical view of these transactions. Evidence of dubious deals, bribes, faulty surveys and coerced signatures may help explain why many of the Nations now feel they were cheated out of their territory.

The Indian Frontier of the American West, 1846-1890 by Robert M. Utley:

First published in 1984, Robert Utley’s The Indian Frontier of the American West, 1846-1890, is considered a classic for both students and scholars. For this revision, Utley includes scholarship and research that has become available in recent years.;

What they said about the first edition:
“(The Indian Frontier of the American West, 1846-1890) provides an excellent synthesis of Indian-white relations in the trans-Mississippi West during the last half-century of the frontier period.” – Journal of American History

“The Indian Frontier of the American West combines good writing, solid research, and penetrating interpretations. The result is a fresh and welcome study that departs from the soldier-chases-Indian approach that is all too typical of other books on the topic.” – Minnesota History

“(Robert M. Utley) has carefully eschewed sensationalism and glib oversimplification in favor of critical appraisal, and his firm command of some of the best published research of others provides a solid foundation for his basic argument that Indian hostility in the half century following the Mexican War was directed less at the white man per se than at the hated reservation system itself.” – Pacific Historical Review

A Native American Encyclopedia: History, Culture, and Peoples by Barry M. Pritzker:

Dispelling myths, answering questions, and stimulating thoughtful avenues for further inquiry, this highly absorbing reference provides a wealth of specific information about over 200 North American Indian groups in Canada and the United States. Readers will easily access important historical and contemporary facts about everything from notable leaders and relations with non-natives to customs, dress, dwellings, weapons, government, and religion.

This book is at once exhaustive and captivating, covering myriad aspects of a people spread across a continent.

Divided into ten geographic areas for easy reference, this work illustrates each Native American group in careful detail. Listed alphabetically, starting with the tribal name, translation, origin, and definition, each entry includes significant facts about the group’s location and population, as well as impressive accounts of the group’s history and culture. Bringing entries up-to-date, Barry Pritzker also presents current information on each group’s government, economy, legal status, and land holdings. Whether interpreting the term “tribe” (many traditional Native American groups were not tribes at all but more like extended families) or describing how a Shoshone woman served as a guide on the Lewis and Clark expedition, Pritzker always presents the material in a clear and lively manner.

In light of past and ongoing injustices and the momentum of Indian and Inuit self-determination movements, an understanding of Native American cultures as well as their contributions to contemporary society becomes increasingly important. A magnificent resource, this book liberally provides the essential information necessary to better grasp the history and cultures of North American Indians.

The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians by Naomi Schaefer Riley:

If you want to know why American Indians have the highest rates of poverty of any racial group, why suicide is the leading cause of death among Indian men, why native women are two and a half times more likely to be raped than the national average and why gang violence affects American Indian youth more than any other group, do not look to history. There is no doubt that white settlers devastated Indian communities in the 19th, and early 20th centuries. But it is our policies today—denying Indians ownership of their land, refusing them access to the free market and failing to provide the police and legal protections due to them as American citizens—that have turned reservations into small third-world countries in the middle of the richest and freest nation on earth.

The tragedy of our Indian policies demands reexamination immediately—not only because they make the lives of millions of American citizens harder and more dangerous—but also because they represent a microcosm of everything that has gone wrong with modern liberalism. They are the result of decades of politicians and bureaucrats showering a victimized people with money and cultural sensitivity instead of what they truly need—the education, the legal protections and the autonomy to improve their own situation.

If we are really ready to have a conversation about American Indians, it is time to stop bickering about the names of football teams and institute real reforms that will bring to an end this ongoing national shame.

A Proud Heritage: Native American Services in New York State:

A general description of this short book taken from the book itself:

“Dear Readers, New York State is committed to helping improve and promote the well-being and safety of our children, families and communities. The New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) is one of three state agencies entrusted with specific obligations to serve New York’s Native American population. OCFS’ responsibilities are broad and address various needs of the Indian Nations. This booklet, A Proud Heritage, offers a historical overview of New York State’s Native Americans, details current state services and provides valuable references. I am proud to introduce the 2001 version of this publication, which I’m sure will be a useful resource to those interested in Native American affairs in New York State. Sincerely, John A. Johnson”

This 82 page title is also available for free online via the following New York State publications link:

https://ocfs.ny.gov/main/publications/Pub4629ProudHeritage.pdf

Real All Americans: The Team That Changed a Game, a People, a Nation by Sally Jenkins:

Sally Jenkins, bestselling co-author of It’s Not About the Bike, revives a forgotten piece of history in The Real All Americans. In doing so, she has crafted a truly inspirational story about a Native American football team that is as much about football as Lance Armstrong’s book was about a bike.

If you’d guess that Yale or Harvard ruled the college gridiron in 1911 and 1912, you’d be wrong. The most popular team belonged to an institution called the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. Its story begins with Lt. Col. Richard Henry Pratt, a fierce abolitionist who believed that Native Americans deserved a place in American society. In 1879,

Pratt made a treacherous journey to the Dakota Territory to recruit Carlisle’s first students.

Years later, three students approached Pratt with the notion of forming a football team. Pratt liked the idea, and in less than twenty years the Carlisle football team was defeating their Ivy League opponents and in the process changing the way the game was played.

Sally Jenkins gives this story of unlikely champions a breathtaking immediacy. We see the legendary Jim Thorpe kicking a winning field goal, watch an injured Dwight D. Eisenhower limping off the field, and follow the glorious rise of Coach Glenn “Pop” Warner as well as his unexpected fall from grace.

The Real All Americans is about the end of a culture and the birth of a game that has thrilled Americans for generations. It is an inspiring reminder of the extraordinary things that can be achieved when we set aside our differences and embrace a common purpose.

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman & Beth Dooley: 

2018 James Beard Award Winner: Best American Cookbook

Named one of the Best Cookbooks of 2017 by NPR, The Village Voice, Smithsonian Magazine, UPROXX, New York Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, Mpls. St. PaulMagazine and others

Here is real food—our indigenous American fruits and vegetables, the wild and foraged ingredients, game and fish. Locally sourced, seasonal, “clean” ingredients and nose-to-tail cooking are nothing new to Sean Sherman, the Oglala Lakota chef and founder of The Sioux Chef. In his breakout book, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, Sherman shares his approach to creating boldly seasoned foods that are vibrant, healthful, at once elegant and easy.
Sherman dispels outdated notions of Native American fare—no fry bread or Indian tacos here—and no European staples such as wheat flour, dairy products, sugar, and domestic pork and beef. The Sioux Chef’s healthful plates embrace venison and rabbit, river and lake trout, duck and quail, wild turkey, blueberries, sage, sumac, timpsula or wild turnip, plums, purslane, and abundant wildflowers. Contemporary and authentic, his dishes feature cedar braised bison, griddled wild rice cakes, amaranth crackers with smoked white bean paste, three sisters salad, deviled duck eggs, smoked turkey soup, dried meats, roasted corn sorbet, and hazelnut-maple bites.

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen is a rich education and a delectable introduction to modern indigenous cuisine of the Dakota and Minnesota territories, with a vision and approach to food that travels well beyond those borders.

Unsung Heroes of World War II: The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers by Deanne Durrett:

On February 23, 1945, U.S. Marines claimed victory in the battle of Iwo Jima, one of the most important battles in the Pacific islands during World War II. Instrumental to this defeat of Japanese forces was a group of specialized Marines involved in a secret program. Throughout the war, Japanese intelligence agencies were able to intercept and break nearly every battlefield code the United States created. The Navajo Code Talkers, however, devised a complex code based on their native language and perfected it so that messages could be coded, transmitted, and decoded in minutes. The Navajo Code was the only battlefield code that Japan never deciphered. Unsung Heroes of World War II details the history of the men who created this secret code and used it on the battlefield to help the United States win World War II in the Pacific.

A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America’s First Indian Doctor by Joe Starita:

The poignant and moving biography of Susan La Flesche Picotte, the first Native American doctor in U.S. history.

On March 14, 1889, Susan La Flesche Picotte received her medical degree—becoming the first Native American doctor in U.S. history. She earned her degree thirty-one years before women could vote and thirty-five years before Indians could become citizens in their own country.

By age twenty-six, this fragile but indomitable Native woman became the doctor to her tribe. Overnight, she acquired 1,244 patients scattered across 1,350 square miles of rolling countryside with few roads. Her patients often were desperately poor and desperately sick—tuberculosis, small pox, measles, influenza—families scattered miles apart, whose last hope was a young woman who spoke their language and knew their customs.

This is the story of an Indian woman who effectively became the chief of an entrenched patriarchal tribe, the story of a woman who crashed through thick walls of ethnic, racial and gender prejudice, then spent the rest of her life using a unique bicultural identity to improve the lot of her people—physically, emotionally, politically, and spiritually.
Joe Starita’s A Warrior of the People is the moving biography of Susan La Flesche Picotte’s inspirational life and dedication to public health, and it will finally shine a light on her numerous accomplishments.

The author is donating all royalties from this book to a college scholarship fund he has established for Native American high school graduates.

Have a great weekend,

Linda, SSCL

Suggested Listening November 9, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our lucky seven musical recommendations for the week; five streaming suggestions* and two recommended albums on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

Complete Columbia: Live at University of Missouri 4/25/93 (2016) by Big Star (Genre: Rock, Classic Rock):

Singer-songwriter and Big Star founder Alex Chilton leads a reformed Big Star on this concert recording.

Chilton’s voice still features the same sweet and deep tone evident on his first hit – The Box Top’s The Letter. This album features a cool collection of straight ahead rock n’ roll songs that deliver – sort of like a Howard Johnson motel or your favorite winter sweater – you know just what to expect – great, solid rock music.

Songs on the LP include: With My Baby’s Beside Me, I Am The Cosmos, The Ballad of el Goodo, Way Out West and September Gurls.

Walls (2018) by Barbra Streisand (Genre: Vocal, Pop):

Walls, Streisand’s just released new album, features something you would expect, lush strings accompanying Streisand’s vocals. However, the songs are something you might not expect – they are songs that reflect the strange place America finds itself in 2018

Songs on the LP include: Walls, What The World Needs Now, Love’s Never Wrong, Take Care Of This House and Imagine/What A Wonderful World medley.

Moochin’ Abouts Stateside Hitlist 1962 by Various Artists (Genre: Pop, Rock):

The Moochin’ Abouts Stateside Hitlist series of streamable/downloadable albums feature every song to hit the Billboard Top 30 from 1947 to 1962.

This collection features all the songs to hit the Billboard Top 30 in 1962; and as that list contains 292 songs and clocks in at twelve hours, 38 minutes and 18 second, I’m not going to mention even a quarter of those songs– we’d be here all day!

Suffice it to say if you like pop and rock music of the early sixties, then you’ll like this collection!

A handful of the songs in the set include: Return To Sender by Elvis, (I’m The Girl From) Wolverton Mountain by Jo Ann Campbell, Lie To Me by Brook Benton, Moon River by Henry Mancini, Town Without Pity by Gene Pitney, Gypsy Woman by The Impressions, Soldier Boy by the Shirelles and You Are Mine by Frankie Avalon.

Sings Lonely And Blue (1960) / Crying (1962) by Roy Orbison (Genre: Rock, Classic Rock, Early Sixties Rock):

This double album set features Roy Orbison’s first two studio albums: Sings Lonely And Blue and Crying.

Sings Lonely And Blue (1960): Fifty eight years after its original release the significance of this album has been as been partially forgotten. Granted, modern music fans know who Roy Orbison was and are familiar with some of his greatest songs, i.e., Oh, Pretty Woman, Only The Lonely, Running Scared etc. but the fact that he was a tremendous Rock N’ Roll vocalist with a three octave range, and that his music mixed his distinct voice with elements of country while still maintaining a rock n’ roll beat may be something younger music fans aren’t aware of – so they should check out this collection!

The first twelve songs in this collection are from Sings Lonely And Blue. The songs include: Only The Lonely, Bye Bye Love, I Can’t Stop Loving You, Come Back To Me and Twenty-Two Days.

Crying (1962): The second twelve songs in this digital double album set, starting with the title track Crying, are from Roy Orbison’s second album. The Crying album follows 1960’s Sings Lonely And Blue and a compilation LP of Orbison’s Rockabilly music recorded in 1955 and released in 1961 – titled At The Rock House.

Songs on the Crying LP include: Raindrops, I’m Hurtin’, The Great Pretender, Wedding Day, Summersong and Dance.

An Album To Benefit Preservation Hall & The Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program (Deluxe Version) by Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Genre: Jazz, Traditional New Orleans Jazz):

Preservation Hall Jazz Band is playing the next Civic Music concert on Saturday, November 17, 2018!

This album is from 2010 and features the New Orleans traditionalists in fine fettle playing their usual top-notch upbeat Jazz.

Songs in the 25 song collection include: Shake It And Break it, St. James Infirmary, Between The Devil & The Deep Blue Sea, Louisiana Fairytale, After You’ve Gone and Freight Train.

Recommended CDs of the Week:

So It Is! (2017) by Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Genre: Jazz):

So It Is! is the latest release by the band known far and wide for playing traditional New Orleans Jazz.

Here’s the AllMusic Review of the LP: Listening to So It Is, one is immediately picked up by the Latin rhythms of the songs, which carry the musicians and the listener joyfully forward through each track. The record is full of upbeat numbers which reflect not only a Latin and Caribbean flavor, but also the more driving elements of the blues and big band swing, so that the entire record passes quickly and leaves the listener’s day a great deal lighter and brighter. Kenneth Bridgham, AllMusic

Songs on the album include: So It Is, Santiago, Innocence, La Malanga, Convergence, One Hundred Fires & Mad.

E.G.O. by Lucie Silvas (Genre: Rock, Country, Pop, Singer-Songwriter):

E.G.O. is the new album by singer-songwriter Lucie Silvas who hails from Nashville and is known for writing songs for country artists including Reba McEntire and Miranda Lambert.

Songs on the rocking album include: Kite, Girls From California, First Rate Heartbreak, Everything Looks Beautiful and Just For The Record.

Videos of the Week:

Walls by Barbara Streisand

Town Without Pity by Gene Pitney

Running Scared by Roy Orbison

Oh, Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison

Shake It And Break It by Preservation Hall Jazz Band

So It Is by Preservation Hall Jazz Band

Kite by Lucie Silvas

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Suggested Reading November 5, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

(Note: Click on the photo of the item you’d like to request or check out)

Digital Suggestions Of The Week:

Been So Long, My Life and Music written and read by Jorma Kaukonen with Grace Slick and Jack Cassidy (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

This audiobook is perfect for classic rock fans! Guitarist Jorma Kaukonen was an original member of The Jefferson Airplane and, has subsequently played music for decades with his childhood friend bassist Jack Cassidy in the band Hot Tuna. Cassidy too was a founding member of the Jefferson Airplane.

And here is an in-depth description of this neat audiobook:

From the man who made a name for himself as a founding member and lead guitarist of Jefferson Airplane comes a memoir that offers a rare glimpse into the heart and soul of a musical genius—and a vivid journey through the psychedelic era in America.

“Music is the reward for being alive,” writes Jorma Kaukonen in this candid and emotional account of his life and work. “It stirs memory in a singular way that is unmatched.” In a career that has already spanned a half century—one that has earned him induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, among other honors—Jorma is best known for his legendary bands Jefferson Airplane and the still-touring Hot Tuna. But before he won worldwide recognition he was just a young man with a passion and a dream.

Been So Long is the story of how Jorma found his place in the world of music and beyond. The grandson of Finnish and Russian-Jewish immigrants whose formative years were spent abroad with his American-born diplomat father, Jorma channeled his life experiences—from his coming-of-age in Pakistan and the Philippines to his early gigs with Jack Casady in D.C. to his jam sessions in San Francisco with Jerry Garcia, Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan, and other contemporaries—into his art in unique and revelatory ways.

Been So Long charts not only Jorma’s association with the bands that made him famous but goes into never-before-told details about his addiction and recovery, his troubled first marriage and still-thriving second, and more. Interspersed with diary entries, personal correspondence, and song lyrics, this memoir is as unforgettable and inspiring as Jorma’s music itself.

The Devaney Brothers: Ryan and Sean: Ryan’s Place\Sean’s Reckoning (Format: eBook):

#1 New York Times bestselling author Sherryl Woods brings readers two classic tales of the Devaneys…brothers torn apart in childhood, reunited by love

Ryan’s Place
Abandoned by his parents and separated from his brothers, Ryan Devaney doesn’t believe in love. Until Maggie O’Brien storms into his Irish pub and her bright smile and tender touch have him reconsidering. The beautiful redhead warms his frozen spirit and awakens forgotten dreams—like the desire to search for his long-lost brothers. Will he dare to believe there’s a place for them in happily-ever-after?

Sean’s Reckoning
Son of a shattered family, fireman Sean Devaney knows love never lasts, so he refuses to chance it. Then he meets single mom Deanna Blackwell, who has just lost everything in a devastating fire. Despite the warning in Sean’s head, he’s drawn to protect the stunning woman and her son. Sean may be tough enough to storm burning buildings…but is he brave enough to risk building a family of his own?

Drums Of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon (Format: eBook):

The magnificent saga continues….

It began in Scotland, at an ancient stone circle. There, a doorway, open to a select few, leads into the past–or the grave. Claire Randall survived the extraordinary passage, not once but twice. Her first trip swept her into the arms of Jamie Fraser, an eighteenth-century Scot whose love for her became legend–a tale of tragic passion that ended with her return to the present to bear his child. Her second journey, two decades later, brought them together again in frontier America. But Claire had left someone behind in the twentieth century. Their daughter, Brianna….

Now Brianna has made a disturbing discovery that sends her to the stone circle and a terrifying leap into the unknown. In search of her mother and the father she has never met, she is risking her own future to try to change history…and to save their lives. But as Brianna plunges into an uncharted wilderness, a heartbreaking encounter may strand her forever in the past…or root her in the place she should be, where her heart and soul belong….

The Finkler Question: A Novel by Howard Jacobson (Format: eBook):

He should have seen it coming. His life had been one mishap after another. So he should have been prepared for this one… Julian Treslove, a professionally unspectacular and disappointed BBC worker, and Sam Finkler, a popular Jewish philosopher, writer and television personality, are old school friends. Despite a prickly relationship and very different lives, they’ve never quite lost touch with each other – or with their former teacher, Libor Sevick, a Czechoslovakian always more concerned with the wider world than with exam results.

Now, both Libor and Finkler are recently widowed, and with Treslove, his chequered and unsuccessful record with women rendering him an honorary third widower, they dine at Libor’s grand, central London apartment. It’s a sweetly painful evening of reminiscence in which all three remove themselves to a time before they had loved and lost; a time before they had fathered children, before the devastation of separations, before they had prized anything greatly enough to fear the loss of it. Better, perhaps, to go through life without knowing happiness at all because that way you had less to mourn? Treslove finds he has tears enough for the unbearable sadness of both his friends’ losses.
And it’s that very evening, at exactly 11:30pm, as Treslove hesitates a moment outside the window of the oldest violin dealer in the country as he walks home, that he is attacked. After this, his whole sense of who and what he is will slowly and ineluctably change. The Finkler Question is a scorching story of exclusion and belonging, justice and love, ageing, wisdom and humanity. Funny, furious, unflinching, this extraordinary novel shows one of our finest writers at his brilliant best.

Homemade Holiday, Craft Your Way Through More than 40 Festive Projects by Sophie Pester & Catharina Bruns (Format: eBook):

Bring the magic of a handmade Christmas into your home with 40 projects for gifts, decorations, and homemade wrapping paper.

Save time and money with the festive craft projects in Homemade Holiday. Clear, step-by-step instructions guide readers to create fresh flower garlands, bake edible gift tags, make homemade bath salts, and paint authentic tree ornaments. With last-minute ideas and lots of inspiration, this book will help you wrap up gift-giving and decorating for the holiday season.

Print Suggestions Of The Week:

A Christmas Revelation by Anne Perry: 

In this intriguing, uplifting holiday mystery from bestselling author Anne Perry, an orphan boy investigates a woman’s kidnapping—and discovers there’s more at stake than a disappearance.

It wouldn’t quite be Christmas without a holiday mystery decorated with all the Victorian trimmings, as only New York Times bestselling author Anne Perry can render it. Now the tradition continues as mayhem is once again found under the mistletoe, and intrigue stalks the cobblestone streets and gaslit parlors of old London Town.

Formerly a river urchin living on the banks of the Thames, nine-year-old Worm has never experienced a family Christmas. But thanks to a job at Hester Monk’s clinic in Portpool Lane, he’s found a makeshift family in kindly volunteer Miss Claudine Burroughs and curmudgeonly old bookkeeper Squeaky Robinson. When Worm witnesses the abduction of a beautiful woman by a pair of ruffians just days before Christmas, he frantically turns to Squeaky for help. A one-time brothel owner, Squeaky knows the perils of interfering in nasty business, but he can’t bear to disappoint Worm—or leave the boy to attempt a rescue on his own. What neither of the would-be saviors expects, however, is that the damsel in distress already has her dilemma well in hand . . . and is taking steps to bring her captors to justice for crimes far worse than kidnapping. But the rogues, as cunning as they are deadly, are not to be underestimated. The aid of cynical old Squeaky and hopeful young Worm just might make the difference between a merry triumph over evil and a terrible yuletide tragedy.

Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly:

LAPD Detective Renée Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch in the new work of fiction from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly.

Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin. Ballard kicks him out, but then checks into the case herself and it brings a deep tug of empathy and anger.

Bosch is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a runaway on the streets of Hollywood who was brutally murdered and her body left in a dumpster like so much trash. Now, Ballard joins forces with Bosch to find out what happened to Daisy and finally bring her killer to justice.

Heads You Win: A Novel by Jeffrey Archer:

Leningrad, Russia, 1968. Alexander Karpenko is no ordinary child, and from an early age, it is clear he is destined to lead his countrymen. But when his father is assassinated by the KGB for defying the state, he and his mother will have to escape from Russia if they hope to survive. At the docks, they are confronted with an irreversible choice: should they board a container ship bound for America, or Great Britain? Alexander leaves that choice to the toss of a coin . . .

In a single moment, a double twist decides Alexander’s future. During an epic tale of fate and fortune, spanning two continents and thirty years, we follow his triumphs and defeats as he struggles as an immigrant to conquer his new world. As this unique story unfolds, Alexander comes to realize where his destiny lies, and accepts that he must face the past he left behind in Russia.

Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty:

Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever? In Liane Moriarty’s latest page-turner, nine perfect strangers are about to find out…

Nine people gather at a remote health resort. Some are here to lose weight, some are here to get a reboot on life, some are here for reasons they can’t even admit to themselves. Amidst all of the luxury and pampering, the mindfulness and meditation, they know these ten days might involve some real work. But none of them could imagine just how challenging the next ten days are going to be.

Frances Welty, the formerly best-selling romantic novelist, arrives at Tranquillum House nursing a bad back, a broken heart, and an exquisitely painful paper cut. She’s immediately intrigued by her fellow guests. Most of them don’t look to be in need of a health resort at all. But the person that intrigues her most is the strange and charismatic owner/director of Tranquillum House. Could this person really have the answers Frances didn’t even know she was seeking? Should Frances put aside her doubts and immerse herself in everything Tranquillum House has to offer – or should she run while she still can?

It’s not long before every guest at Tranquillum House is asking exactly the same question.

Combining all of the hallmarks that have made her writing a go-to for anyone looking for wickedly smart, page-turning fiction that will make you laugh and gasp, Liane Moriarty’s Nine Perfect Strangers once again shows why she is a master of her craft.

The Rain Watcher: A Novel Tatiana de Rosnay:

The first new novel in four years from the beloved superstar author of Sarah’s Key, a heartbreaking and uplifting story of family secrets and devastating disaster, set against a Paris backdrop, fraught with revelations, and resolutions.
“Hypnotic, passionate, ominous and tender—unforgettable.” —Jenna Blum, New York Times and internationally bestselling author of Those Who Save Us

Linden Malegarde has come home to Paris from the United States. It has been years since the whole family was all together. Now the Malegarde family is gathering for Paul, Linden’s father’s 70th birthday.

Each member of the Malegarde family is on edge, holding their breath, afraid one wrong move will shatter their delicate harmony. Paul, the quiet patriarch, an internationally-renowned arborist obsessed with his trees and little else, has always had an uneasy relationship with his son. Lauren, his American wife, is determined that the weekend celebration will be a success. Tilia, Linden’s blunt older sister, projects an air of false fulfillment. And Linden himself, the youngest, uncomfortable in his own skin, never quite at home no matter where he lives—an American in France and a Frenchman in the U.S.—still fears that, despite his hard-won success as a celebrated photographer, he will always be a disappointment to his parents.

Their hidden fears and secrets slowly unravel as the City of Light undergoes a stunning natural disaster, and the Seine bursts its banks and floods the city. All members of the family will have to fight to keep their unity against tragic circumstances. In this profound and intense novel of love and redemption, de Rosnay demonstrates all of her writer’s skills both as an incredible storyteller but also as a soul seeker.

Have a great week!

Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day:

RBDigital

Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available.

About Library Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Great Freegal Playlist – Six String Salvation: Top Guitar Solos

Hi everyone, in searching through the Freegal Catalog today, I came across a great playlist for those who love listening to great guitarists.

This playlist offers selections of cool playing by rock, jazz and country guitarists from the thirties to today.

This 90 song collection includes songs by artists/bands that came to prominence in the forties and fifties including Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Buddy Guy, Earl Hooker, Chet Atkins and B.B. King, to artists that broke into the consciousness of mainstream music listeners in the sixties and seventies including Jimi Hendrix, George Benson, AC/DC, David Gilmour, Jeff Beck, Allan Holdsworth and Carlos Santana, to artists/bands that arrived in the eighties or later including Chon, Nels Cline Singers, Living Colour and Rage Against The Machine.

So if you’re hanging out at home this weekend or even in your car on the road – this is a great set to stream!

Songs in the collection include: Bright Lights by Gary Clark Jr., Baby Please Don’t Leave Me by Buddy Guy, The Boys Are Back In Town by Thin Lizzy, Man In The Box by Alice In Chains, Deep River Blues by Doc Watson, Sails of Charon by Scorpions, Wipe Out by The Ventures and Cross Road Blues by Robert Johnson.

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

Suggested Listening November 2, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our lucky seven musical recommendations for the week; five streaming suggestions* and two recommended albums on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

Out Of The Ashes (2006) by Jessi Colter (Genre: Country, Outlaw Country):

Jessi Cotler was the lone woman in the 1970s Outlaw Country group of artists that included Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson and, Colter’s second husband Waylon Jennings.

And as a little bit of trivia, the reason I mention that Waylon Jennings was Cotler’s second husband is because her first husband, Rock N’ Roll hall of famer Duane Eddy, was born in Corning!

Getting back to Jessi, her first album, A Country Star Is Born was released in 1970. Five years later she hit her recordings stride and released her break-out album I’m Jessi Colter which featured her break out single the song I’m Not Lisa. Colter subsequently became a popular country artist and her albums sold well during the “Country Outlaw” period of the mid to late seventies.

Since the seventies heyday of Country Outlaw music, Colter has continued to perform and occasionally record – her most recent album, the spiritual The Psalms was released just last year.

Out Of The Ashes was originally released in 2006 and is a top-notch album that should go on the shelf right next to the best of her seventies albums: I’m Jessi Colter, Diamond In the Rough & Colter

Songs on the LP include: You Can Pick ‘Em, Starman, The Phoenix Rises, Out Of The Rain, Velvet And Steel, Never Got Over You, The Canyon and Please Carry Me Home.

2010-07-24 Performing Arts Center, Purchase, NY (Live) by Hot Tuna with Steve Earle (Genre: Rock, Folk, Country): 

Hot Tuna is a bluesy folk rock band formed by two of the original members of The Jefferson Airplane – guitarist Jorma Kaukonen and bassist Jack Cassidy. Kaukonen and Cassidy are life-long friends having grown up together in Washington, D.C., and, they started this side-project band while still members of The Jefferson Airplane. By the early seventies they had both left the Airplane to focus on Hot Tuna. In the years since, the band has continued to play live concerts and record albums.

This 2010 live album features the songs: I See The Light, I Can’t Be Satisfied, Long Gone From Bowlin’ Green, Arrowhead, If This Is Love, I Want My Money Back and Hometown Blues with guest artist Steve Earle.

Southeastern (2013) by Jason Isbell (Genre: Folk/Americana, Pop, Rock):

Singer-songwriter/guitarist Jason Isebell worked with the band The Truckers before turning his focus towards a solo career. Southeastern is his fourth album and clearly shows that Isbell has a talent for writing solid story songs.

Songs on the album include: Live Oak, Different Days, Songs That She Sang In The Shower, Super 8, Relatively Easy and Cover Me Up.

An Italian Night – Live from the Waldbühne Berlin with Jonas Kaufmann (Genre: Classical, Vocal):

One summer night in 2018, Jonas Kaufmann treated thousands at Berlin’s open-air Waldbühne to an evening of Italian passion that even the unexpectedly stormy weather failed to dampen. His wide-ranging program, based largely on his 2016 album, Dolce Vita, mixes the great arias of Italian opera, from Mascagni’s Cavalleria rusticana to Puccini’s Turandot (“Nessun dorma” brings the evening to a rousing close), with Neopolitan songs and Italian hits. Kaufmann, in fine form, clearly wows the audiences with his considerable charm and creates ample musical chemistry with mezzo Anita Rachvelishvili, mesmerizing in Lucio Dalla’s “Caruso.” A thoroughly uplifting concert captured beautifully.

The “In” Sound – Presented By The United States Army by Various Artists (Genre: Classic Rock, Classic Recruitment Commercials):

Harry Harrison was a radio host who worked for WFMU in Jersey City, New Jersey in the 1960s.

I have searched for information on this album and found very little info online. “The In Sound”, was evidently a weekly radio program that featured some of the big pop-rock artists of the era. The program was hosted by Harrison and “presented by the U.S. Army.” This EP features five songs and includes U.S. Army recruiting promotions interspersed between the songs. Whether or not the radio show was aired on WFMU or some branch of the Armed Forces Radio Network is not something I have been able to discover.

However, this 25 minute, 5 songs radio show is a blast from the past!

If you like the music of the late sixties – give it a listen!

The EP features the following songs: Ha Ha, Said The Clown by The Yardbirds, Let The Good Times Roll And Feel So Good by Bunny Sigler, Words by The Monkees, I Like The Way by Tommy James & The Shondells and Lonesome Road by The Wonder Who.

The Yardbirds, Tommy James and The Monkees are all still well known groups today. Bunny Sigler was an producer and singer-songwriter from Philadelphia whose biggest hit was the one found on this EP – Let The Good Times Roll And Feel So Good. He was also one of the pillars of the seventies Philadelphia Sound, and, The Wonder Who is a band better known by another name — The Four Seasons.

Recommended CDs of the Week:

The Light Of The Sun (2011) by Jill Scott (Genre: R&B, Pop):

Jill Scott is a singing, songwriting actress with a great voice!

She is known for her role as Hounddog in the HBO series The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency. And for her intense, deep singing voice. This is her sixth album and it is a great place to jump in and listen to her music if you haven’t heard it before.

This album is full of terrific songs that clearly illustrate Scott is one of the best R&B singer-songwriters working today.

Songs on the album include: Blessed, Le Boom Vent Suite, Hear My Call, Some Other Time and a So In Love a duet with Anthony Hamilton.

Robbie Robertson (1987) by Robbie Robertson (Rock, Classic Rock, Folk-Rock):

This 1987 album by Band co-founder Robbie Robertson is his first solo album. The music is top-notch but those expecting it to sound like the music of The Band may be disappointed as the album branches out past the Americana folk style that The Band is known for.

This album has everything from ethereal songs (Fallen Angel) to intense rockers (Hell’s Half Acre & Showdown At Big Sky) to introspective songs (Broken Arrow & Sonny Got Caught In The Moonlight) and if you haven’t heard it before – I highly recommend it!

Songs on the album include: Sweet Fire Of Love, Fallen Angel, Broken Arrow, Somewhere Down The Crazy River and American Roulette.

Videos of the Week:

The Phoenix Rises by Jessi Colter

Out Of The Rain by Jessi Colter with Waylon Jennings and Tony Jo White

Hometown Blues by Hot Tuna with Steve Earle

Live From The Capital Theatre 12/8/2017 (2 hours & 55 minutes) by Hot Tuna

Cover Me Up by Jason Isbell

Live At House Of Blues (February 27, 2016) by Jason Isbell (1 hour and 45 minute show)

Jonas Kaufmann – Trailer: An Italian Night – Live at the Waldbühne Berlin

Jonas Kaufmann – Ti voglio tanto bene – Live from Berlin’s Waldbühne

Ha Ha Said The Clown by The Yardbirds

Lonesome Road by The Wonder Who (Four Seasons):

Fallen Angel by Robbie Robertson

Somewhere Down The Crazy River by Robbie Robertson

Womanifesto by Jill Scott

When I Wake Up by Jill Scott

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Did You Know…November is Native American Heritage Month?

Did You Know…

November is Native American Heritage Month?

It is!

And as there are many books, DVDs and even music titles available in our system that highlight the rich culture of the Native American peoples, I’m going to post a list of recommended titles each of the first four Fridays of this month for your perusal.

This weeks’ selections include fiction titles, on November 9 we’ll recommend non-fiction titles, on November 16 movies and on November 23 albums featuring Native American music.

Enjoy!

Recommend Fiction Titles:

Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko:

The great Native American Novel of a battered veteran returning home to heal his mind and spirit

More than thirty-five years since its original publication, Ceremony remains one of the most profound and moving works of Native American literature, a novel that is itself a ceremony of healing. Tayo, a World War II veteran of mixed ancestry, returns to the Laguna Pueblo Reservation. He is deeply scarred by his experience as a prisoner of the Japanese and further wounded by the rejection he encounters from his people. Only by immersing himself in the Indian past can he begin to regain the peace that was taken from him. Masterfully written, filled with the somber majesty of Pueblo myth, Ceremony is a work of enduring power.

Fools Crow by James Welch:

Suspenseful and moving, written with an authenticity and integrity that give it sweeping power, Welch’s third novel (The Death of Jim Loney) is a masterful evocation of a Native American culture and its passing. From their lodges on the endless Montana plains, the members of the Lone Eaters band of the Pikuni (Blackfeet) Indians live in harmony with nature, hunting the “blackhorns” (buffalo), observing a complex system of political administration based on mutual respect and handing down legends that explain the natural world and govern daily conduct. The young protagonist is first called White Man’s Dog, but earns the respected name Fools Crow for meritorious conduct in battle. Through his eyes we watch the escalating tensions between the Pikunis and the white men (“the Napikwans”), who deliberately violate treaties and initiate hostilities with the hard-pressed red men. At the same time, the feared “white scabs plague” (smallpox) decimates the Lone Eaters communities, and they realize that their days are numbered.

There is much to savor in this remarkable book: the ease with which Fools Crow and his brethren converse with animals and spirits, the importance of dreams in their daily lives, the customs and ceremonies that measure the natural seasons and a person’s lifespan. Without violating the patterns of Native American speech, Welsh writes in prose that surges and sings. This bittersweet story is an outstanding work. – Publisher’s Weekly Review.

The Heartsong Of Charging Elk by James Welch:

Charging Elk, an Oglala Sioux, joins Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and journeys from the Black Hills of South Dakota to the back streets of nineteenth-century Marseille. Left behind in a Marseille hospital after a serious injury while the show travels on, he is forced to remake his life alone in a strange land. He struggles to adapt as well as he can, while holding on to the memories and traditions of life on the Plains and eventually falling in love. But none of the worlds the Indian has known can prepare him for the betrayal that follows. This is a story of the American Indian that we have seldom seen: a stranger in a strange land, often an invisible man, loving, violent, trusting, wary, protective, and defenseless against a society that excludes him but judges him by its rules. At once epic and intimate, The Heartsong of Charging Elk echoes across time, geography, and cultures.

House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday:

The magnificent Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of a stranger in his native land

“Both a masterpiece about the universal human condition and a masterpiece of Native American literature. . . . A book everyone should read for the joy and emotion of the language it contains.” – The Paris Review

A young Native American, Abel has come home from war to find himself caught between two worlds. The first is the world of his father’s, wedding him to the rhythm of the seasons, the harsh beauty of the land, and the ancient rites and traditions of his people. But the other world—modern, industrial America—pulls at Abel, demanding his loyalty, trying to claim his soul, and goading him into a destructive, compulsive cycle of depravity and disgust.

Panther in the Sky by James Alexander Thom:

Rich, colorful and bursting with excitement, this remarkable story turns James Alexander Thom’s power and passion for American history to the epic story of Tecumseh’s life and give us a heart-thumping novel of one man’s magnificent destiny—to unite his people in the struggle to save their land and their way of life from the relentless press of the white settlers.

“Oh, what a man this will be, with such a sign as that!”

In 1768, when Turtle Mother gave birth to a strong baby boy in the heart of the Shawnee nation, a green-yellow shooting star streaked across the heavens. Hard Striker saw the unsoma, the birth sign, and named his son Tecumseh, meaning Panther in the Sky . . .

People of the Whale by Linda Hogan:

In telling a story of the fictional A’atsika, a Native people of the American West Coast who find their mythical origins in the whale and the octopus, Hogan (Mean Spirit) employs just the right touch of spiritualism in this engrossing tale. When Thomas Witka Just succumbs to peer pressure and joins the army, then is sent to Vietnam, Ruth Small is pregnant with his child. In an attempt to prevent an atrocity, Thomas kills fellow soldiers and deserts, ultimately blending into the Vietnamese culture and fathering a child, Lin, by Ma, a village girl. In the meantime, Ruth gives birth to their son, Marco Polo, who is said to have the same mystical whaling powers of Thomas’s grandfather. Years later, following Thomas’s return, Dwight, a ne’er-do-well friend of Thomas’s, arranges for the tribe to kill a whale and to sell the meat to the Japanese, a plan that will draw in Marco Polo and set up a confrontation between the whole ensemble. Despite the plot’s multiple strands, the story flows smoothly, and Hogan comes up with a powerful, romantic crescendo.

Power by Linda Hogan:

A mythical, far-reaching masterpiece from one of our best Native American writers. It is the night of an ominous storm when sixteen-year-old Omishto, a member of the Taiga tribe, witnesses her Aunt Ama kill a panther–an animal considered to be a sacred ancestor of the Taiga people. That single act will have profound consequences for Omishto, whose name means “the one who watches.” Suddenly, she is torn between her loyalties to her Westernized mother, who wants her to reject the ways of the tribe, and to Ama and her traditional people, for whom the killing of the panther takes on grave importance. But Omishto’s quest in this timeless, lyrical novel goes far deeper. As she tries to understand the mystery that lies behind Ama’s actions, she must reckon with her own spiritual connection to her people, to nature, and to the world itself. She is caught in a web of powers: the power of the legal system over native peoples, the mythic power that ancestral stories hold over her, and the power that is part of the great mystery of life. This is an extraordinary work about a young girl at a crossroads who must determine her place in the world. Spellbinding and unforgettable, Power will endure as a classic–ensuring Linda Hogan’s stature as one of this country’s most important and urgent writers.

Pushing the Bear by Diane Glancy:

Poet, dramatist, short-story writer and essayist Glancy (winner of an American Book Award for Claiming Breath) turns her talents to the novel, recreating in this bone-true tale the sorrow, struggle and betrayal suffered by the Cherokee along the Trail of Tears. In the winter of 1838-39, 13,000 Cherokee were forced to walk the Trail of Tears from North Carolina toward the “new territory” of present-day Oklahoma. Following the Native American belief that many voices are needed to tell a story, Glancy employs a multitude of narrators. There are the voices of Cherokee of all ages and clans, of white soldiers and preachers, and snatches from actual historical records. The central narrator, Maritole, emerges to tell her personal story of “pushing the bear,” a dark heavy burden of anger, impending madness, physical distress and, above all, doubt in herself and her heritage as she perseveres in the grueling walk. Maritole’s shaky relationship with her husband, and the deaths of her baby and parents, push her into a relationship with a white soldier, Sergeant Williams. Ultimately, however, he can’t fathom the Cherokees’ mystic, symbiotic relationships with the land and with each other. At times, the novel proceeds as slowly as the march itself, but it rewards the reader with a visceral, honest presentation of the Cherokee conception of story as the indestructible chain linking people, earth and ancestrya link that becomes, if not unmitigated salvation, then certainly a salve to the spirit. – Publisher’s Weekly Review

The Round House by Louise Erdrich:

The Round House won the National Book Award for fiction.

One of the most revered novelists of our time—a brilliant chronicler of Native-American life—Louise Erdrich returns to the territory of her bestselling, Pulitzer Prize finalist The Plague of Doves with The Round House, transporting readers to the Ojibwe reservation in North Dakota. It is an exquisitely told story of a boy on the cusp of manhood who seeks justice and understanding in the wake of a terrible crime that upends and forever transforms his family.

Riveting and suspenseful, arguably the most accessible novel to date from the creator of Love Medicine, The Beet Queen, and The Bingo Palace, Erdrich’s The Round House is a page-turning masterpiece of literary fiction—at once a powerful coming-of-age story, a mystery, and a tender, moving novel of family, history, and culture.

Tracks by Louise Erdrich:

From award-winning, New York Times bestselling author Louise Erdrich comes an arresting, lyrical novel set in North Dakota when Native Americans were fighting to keep their lands.

Set in North Dakota at a time in the past century when Indian tribes were struggling to keep what little remained of their lands, Tracks is a tale of passion and deep unrest. Over the course of ten crucial years, as tribal land and trust between people erode ceaselessly, men and women are pushed to the brink of their endurance—yet their pride and humor prohibit surrender.

The reader will experience shock and pleasure in encountering characters that are compelling and rich in their vigor, clarity, and indomitable vitality.

“The author captures the passions, fears, myths, and doom of a living people, and she does so with an ease that leaves the reader breathless.”—The New Yorker

Have a great week,

Linda, SSCL