Suggested Listening November 30, 2018

Hi everyone, and just a bit late, here are our lucky seven musical recommendations for the week.

Our lucky seven suggested listens include five streaming suggestions* and two recommended albums on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

Henry Brown Blues (1961) by Henry Brown (Genre: Blues, Piano Blues):

This LP features a  rocking collection of blues tunes by the great Saint Louis pianist Henry Brown.

Songs on album include: Henry Brown Blues, Bottled In Bond, Blues For Charlie O’Brien, Henry Brown Boogie and Handyman Blues.

Starfish (1988) by The Church (Genre: Rock, Eighties Rock):

A classic 1980s LP by the introspective Australian pop group.

Songs on the LP include: Under the Milky Way, Blood Money, North South East And West, Reptile and A New Season.

Live from the Ryman (2018) by Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit (Genre: Rock):

The new album by Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit is a rocking live LP!

Song in the set include; Last Of My Kind, Flying Over Water, The Life You Chose, Cumberland Gap and Something More Than Free.

Sweet Freedom – Now What? (1994) by Joe McPhee (Genre: Jazz):

Saxophonist Joe McPhee recorded this album as a modern day tribute to Max Roach’s classic 1960 album Sweet Freedom. McPhee takes Roach’s songs and makes them his own, which makes for a great listening experience! He is joined on the LP by Paul Plimley on acoustic piano and Lisle Ellis on double bass.

Songs on the LP include: Mendacity, Driva’ Man, Self Portrait, Singing With A Sword In My Hand, Garvey’s Ghost & Approaching The Smoke.

Annie Up (2013) by Pistol Annies (Genre: Country, Pop):

The Pistol Annies are a country trio comprised of singer-songwriters Angaleena Presley, Miranda Lambert and Ashley Monroe. The Annies wrote or co-wrote all the songs on Annie Up and blended their musical narratives together to create an intimate and relatable album.

Songs on the LP include: I Feel A Sin Comin’ On, Hush Hush, Unhappily Married, Loved By A Workin’ Man, Don’t Talk About Him, Tina and Girls Like Us.

Recommended CDs of the Week:

Jazz Profile: Grant Green (1997) by Grant Green (Genre: Jazz):

“Jazz Profile compiles highlights from Grant Green’s recordings for Blue Note, drawing a rough portrait of his career. The compilation features both soul-jazz and hard-bop cuts, giving a good sense of Green’s depth and range. While there isn’t anything here that will appeal to collector’s, Jazz Profile does offer a nice introduction for curious listeners.” (AllMusic)

Songs on the LP include: Baby’s Minor Lope, My Little Suede Shoes, Go Down Moses, Talking About J. C., Somewhere In The Night and My Favorite Things.

River: The Joni Letters (2007) by Herbie Hancock (Genre: Jazz):

This album features Hancock playing tribute to the terrific songwriter Join Mitchell; he covers 10 of her songs and is accompanied by some great guest artists.

Songs in the set include: Court and Spark (w. Norah Jones), The Jungle Line (w. Leonard Cohen), The River, Edith and Kingpen (w. Tina Turner), Tea Leaf Prophecy (w. Joni Mitchell), Both Sides Now and Amelia (w. Luciana Souza).

Videos of the Week:

Henry Brown Blues by Henry Brown

Under The Milky Way by The Church

Hope The High Road by Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit

Best Years Of My Life by Pistol Annies

This Is The Blues by Otis Spann

Tea Leaf Prophecy by Herbie Hancock with Joni Mitchell


River by Herbie Hancock with Joni Mitchell

Somewhere In The Night by Grant Green

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Suggested Reading November 26, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, five digital titles available through OverDrive and five print titles available through StarCat.

(Note: Click on the photo of the item you’d like to request or check out)

Digital Suggestions Of The Week:

Becoming by Michelle Obama (Format: eBook):

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.

Debbie Macomber’s Table Sharing the Joy of Cooking with Family and Friends by Debbie Macomber (eBook):

One hundred warm and inviting original recipes from the kitchen and the novels of #1 New York Times bestselling author Debbie Macomber—the perfect gift for Mother’s Day!

She’s welcomed you to the Rose Harbor Inn in Cedar Cove, and now the beloved author invites you to take a seat at her table in a new cookbook featuring her favorite recipes. For Debbie Macomber, food means family—recipes and holiday traditions are passed down through generations, and meals provide opportunities for everyone to gather and share their love. In this treasure trove you’ll find one hundred delicious dishes that have become Debbie Macomber’s staples, some inspired by her novels and others by family and friends, including

• Baked Oatmeal—a comforting start to the day, and something Jo Marie would serve her Rose Harbor Inn guests.

• Grilled Fish Tacos with Cilantro-Lime Sauce—a perfect date night delight for Nichole and Rocco from A Girl’s Guide to Moving On

• Gratitude Bread—a wonderful way to express appreciation for the loved ones in your life, a gift that Shay from Any Dream Will Do would bake for her neighbors

• Honey-Chipotle Oven-Roasted Ribs—a mouthwatering dish created by Debbie’s son-in-law, but Sam Carney from If Not for You would easily whip up a succulent platter for friends

• Eggnog Cookies—a sweet treat that Merry would give to Bright in Debbie’s Christmas classic

• Guinness Pot Pie—a meaty show-stopping sensation that could win the heart of a hero in any of Debbie’s books, or the hero in your life

You’ll also discover Macomber go-to favorites—Roasted Sesame Asparagus, Debbie’s Light Clam Chowder, Cookies and Cream Frozen Dessert. And no cookbook would be complete without Debbie’s guilty pleasure: seasoned popcorn.

Loaded with gorgeous photographs and memorable stories about the author’s cherished traditions, Debbie Macomber’s Table embraces the idea that food is more than nourishment. It is a blessing that brings family and friends together.

The Girl On The Train written by Paula Hawkins & narrated by Claire Corbett (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

The #1 New York Times Bestseller, USA Today Book of the Year, now a major motion picture.

The debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people’s lives.

“Nothing is more addicting than The Girl on the Train.”—Vanity Fair

“The Girl on the Train has more fun with unreliable narration than any chiller since Gone Girl. . . . [It] is liable to draw a large, bedazzled readership.”—The New York Times

“Marries movie noir with novelistic trickery. . . hang on tight. You’ll be surprised by what horrors lurk around the bend.”—USA Today

“Like its train, the story blasts through the stagnation of these lives in suburban London and the reader cannot help but turn pages.”—The Boston Globe

“Gone Girl fans will devour this psychological thriller.”—People

EVERY DAY THE SAME
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

UNTIL TODAY
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

Sworn to Silence, Kate Burkholder Series, Book 1 by Linda Castillo (Format: eBook):

A killer is preying on sacred ground….

In the sleepy rural town of Painters Mill, Ohio, the Amish and “English” residents have lived side by side for two centuries. But sixteen years ago, a series of brutal murders shattered the peaceful farming community. In the aftermath of the violence, the town was left with a sense of fragility, a loss of innocence. Kate Burkholder, a young Amish girl, survived the terror of the Slaughterhouse Killer but came away from its brutality with the realization that she no longer belonged with the Amish.

Now, a wealth of experience later, Kate has been asked to return to Painters Mill as Chief of Police. Her Amish roots and big city law enforcement background make her the perfect candidate. She’s certain she’s come to terms with her past—until the first body is discovered in a snowy field. Kate vows to stop the killer before he strikes again. But to do so, she must betray both her family and her Amish past—and expose a dark secret that could destroy her.

Tribe On Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

Based on a Vanity Fair article from June 2015, Tribe is a look at post-traumatic stress disorder and the challenges veterans face returning to society. Using his background in anthropology, Sebastian Junger argues that the problem lies not with vets or with the trauma they’ve suffered, but with the society to which they are trying to return. One of the most puzzling things about veterans who experience PTSD is that the majority never even saw combat—and yet they feel deeply alienated and out of place back home. The reason may lie in our natural inclination, as a species, to live in groups of thirty to fifty people who are entirely reliant on one another for safety, comfort, and a sense of meaning: in short, the life of a soldier. It is one of the ironies of the modern age that as affluence rises in a society, so do rates of suicide, depression, and of course PTSD. In a wealthy society people don’t need to cooperate with one another, so they often lead much lonelier lives that lead to psychological distress. There is a way for modern society to reverse this trend, however, and studying how veterans react to coming home may provide a clue to how to do it. But it won’t be easy.

Print Suggestions Of The Week:

The Bad Neighbor by David Tallerman:

When part-time teacher Ollie Clay panic-buys a rundown house in the outskirts of Leeds, he soon recognises his mistake. His new neighbour, Chas Walker, is an antisocial thug, and Ollie’s suspicions raise links to a local hate group. With Ollie’s life unravelling rapidly, he feels his choices dwindling: his situation is intolerable and only standing up to Chas can change it. But Ollie has his own history of violence, and increasingly, his own secrets to hide; and Chas may be more than the mindless yob he appears to be. As their conflict spills over into the wider world, Ollie will come to learn that there are worse problems in life than one bad neighbor.

Becoming by Michelle Obama:

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.

Hazards of Time Travel by Joyce Carol Oates:

“Time travel” — and its hazards — are made literal in this astonishing new novel in which a recklessly idealistic girl dares to test the perimeters of her tightly controlled (future) world and is punished by being sent back in time to a region of North America — “Wainscotia, Wisconsin” — that existed eighty years before. Cast adrift in time in this idyllic Midwestern town she is set upon a course of “rehabilitation” — but cannot resist falling in love with a fellow exile and questioning the constrains of the Wainscotia world with results that are both devastating and liberating. Arresting and visionary, Hazards of Time Travel is both a novel of harrowing discovery and an exquisitely wrought love story that may be Joyce Carol Oates’s most unexpected novel so far.

Long Road To Mercy by David Baldacci:

Atlee Pine, an FBI special agent assigned to the remote wilds of the western United States. Ever since her twin sister was abducted by a

notorious serial killer at age five, Atlee has spent her life hunting down those who hurt others. And she’s the best at it. She could be one of the Bureau’s top criminal profilers, if she didn’t prefer catching criminals in the vast wilderness of the West to climbing the career ladder in the D.C. office. Her chosen mission is a lonesome one–but that suits her just fine. Now, Atlee is called in to investigate the mutilated carcass of a mule found in the Grand Canyon–and hopefully, solve the disappearance of its rider. But this isn’t the only recent disappearance. In fact, it may be just the first clue, the key to unraveling a rash of other similar missing persons cases in the canyon.

Target Alex Cross by James Patterson:

A leader has fallen, and the procession route from Capitol Hill to the White House is lined with hundreds of thousands of mourners. None feel the loss of a President more keenly than Alex Cross, who has devoted his life to the public good. A sniper’s bullet strikes a target in the heart of DC. Alex Cross’s wife, Bree Stone, newly elevated chief of DC detectives, faces an ultimatum: solve the case, or lose the position for which she’s worked her entire career. The Secret Service and the FBI deploy as well in the race to find the shooter. Alex is tasked by the new President to take a personal role with the FBI, leading an investigation unprecedented in scale and scope. Alex has a horrible premonition: is the sniper’s strike only the beginning of a larger attack on the nation?

Have a great week!

Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day:

RBDigital

Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available.

About Library Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

Suggested Listening November 23, 2018

Happy holiday weekend everyone!

Since the library is open on Friday but closed for rug cleaning on Saturday, I’m going to offer a list of seven streaming music selections for this week and no CDs.

And this week our seven streaming collections all feature music performed at the B.B.C.

Live at the BBC by Chris Farlowe (Genre: Rock, Classic Rock, Pop, Sixties):

Live at the BBC 1970-1978 by Climax Blues Band (Genre: Rock, Pop. Seventies):

Live At The BBC by The Graham Bond Organisation (Genre: Rock, Jazz, Blues, Sixties):

Live at the BBC by The Mystreated (Genre: Garage Band, Rock):

Live at the BBC by The Pretty Things (Genre: Rock, Classic Rock, Sixties):

At the BBC 1972-1982 by Todd Rundgren (Genre: Rock, Pop, Seventies):

Live at the BBC by Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band (Genre: Soul, R&B, Pop, Sixties):

Videos Of The Week:

Harmonica by The Graham Bond Organisation (with future Cream members Jack Bruce & Ginger Baker)

Tyme Is Passing by The Mystreated

The Cat by Zoot Money & The Big Roll Band

Out of Time by Chris Farlowe

Don’t Bring Me Down by The Pretty Things

Couldn’t Get It Right by The Climax Blues Band

I Saw the Light by Todd Rundrgen

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

Suggested Reading November 21, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for this week!

And just in case anyone out there is wondering, although the library is closed on Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday and on Saturday for rug cleaning — we will be open our regular hours of 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. on Friday.

So while you’re out and about on Friday, drop in and pick up some books and DVDs for the weekend!

(Note: Click on the photo of the item you’d like to request or check out)

Digital Suggestions Of The Week:

All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir by Nicole Chung (Format: eBook)

Named a Best Book of Fall by The Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, TIME, Elle, and more

“This book moved me to my very core. . . . [All You Can Ever Know] should be required reading for anyone who has ever had, wanted, or found a family―which is to say, everyone.” ―Celeste Ng, author of Little Fires Everywhere

What does it mean to lose your roots—within your culture, within your family—and what happens when you find them?

Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up—facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn’t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from—she wondered if the story she’d been told was the whole truth.

With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets—vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong.

And The Dark Sacred Night: A Novel by Julia Glass (Format: eBook)

In this richly detailed novel about the quest for an unknown father, Julia Glass brings new characters together with familiar figures from her first two novels, immersing readers in a panorama that stretches from suburban New Jersey to rural Vermont and ultimately to the tip of Cape Cod.

Kit Noonan is an unemployed art historian with twins to help support and a mortgage to pay–and a wife frustrated by his inertia. Raised by a strong-willed, secretive single mother, Kit has never known the identity of his father–a mystery that his wife insists he must solve to move forward with his life. Out of desperation, Kit goes to the mountain retreat of his mother’s former husband, Jasper, a take-no-prisoners outdoorsman. There, in the midst of a fierce blizzard, Kit and Jasper confront memories of the bittersweet decade when their families were joined. Reluctantly breaking a long-ago promise, Jasper connects Kit with Lucinda and Zeke Burns, who know the answer he’s looking for. Readers of Glass’s first novel, Three Junes, will recognize Lucinda as the mother of Malachy, the music critic who died of AIDS. In fact, to fully understand the secrets surrounding his paternity, Kit will travel farther still, meeting Fenno McLeod, now in his late fifties, and Fenno’s longtime companion, the gregarious Walter Kinderman.

And the Dark Sacred Night is an exquisitely memorable tale about the youthful choices that steer our destinies, the necessity of forgiveness, and the risks we take when we face down the shadows from our past.

The Noel Stranger written by Richard Paul Evans & narrated by Erin Mallon (Format: Downloadable Audiobook)

From “The King of Christmas,” Richard Paul Evans, comes the next exciting holiday novel perfect for “fans of Debbie Macomber” (Booklist) in his New York Times bestselling Noel Collection.

Maggie Walther feels like her world is imploding. Publicly humiliated after her husband, a local councilman, is arrested for bigamy, and her subsequent divorce, she has isolated herself from the world. When her only friend insists that Maggie climb out of her hole, and embrace the season to get her out of her funk, Maggie decides to put up a Christmas tree and heads off to buy one—albeit reluctantly. She is immediately taken by Andrew, the kind, handsome man who owns the Christmas tree lot and delivers her tree. She soon learns that Andrew is single and new to her city and, like her, is also starting his life anew.

As their friendship develops, Maggie slowly begins to trust again—something she never thought possible. Then, just when she thinks she has finally found happiness, she discovers a dark secret from Andrew’s past. Is there more to this stranger’s truth than meets the eye? This powerful new holiday novel from Richard Paul Evans, the “King of Christmas fiction” (The New York Times), explores the true power of the season, redemption, and the freedom that comes from forgiveness.

The Pisces: A Novel by Melissa Broder (Format: eBook):

LONG-LISTED FOR THE CENTER FOR FICTION FIRST NOVEL PRIZE

“Bold, virtuosic, addictive, erotic – there is nothing like The Pisces. I have no idea how Broder does it, but I loved every dark and sublime page of it.” —Stephanie Danler, author of Sweetbitter

Lucy has been writing her dissertation on Sappho for nine years when she and her boyfriend break up in a dramatic flameout. After she bottoms out in Phoenix, her sister in Los Angeles insists Lucy dog-sit for the summer. Annika’s home is a gorgeous glass cube on Venice Beach, but Lucy can find little relief from her anxiety — not in the Greek chorus of women in her love addiction therapy group, not in her frequent Tinder excursions, not even in Dominic the foxhound’s easy affection.

Everything changes when Lucy becomes entranced by an eerily attractive swimmer while sitting alone on the beach rocks one night. But when Lucy learns the truth about his identity, their relationship, and Lucy’s understanding of what love should look like, take a very unexpected turn. A masterful blend of vivid realism and giddy fantasy, pairing hilarious frankness with pulse-racing eroticism, THE PISCES is a story about falling in obsessive love with a merman: a figure of Sirenic fantasy whose very existence pushes Lucy to question everything she thought she knew about love, lust, and meaning in the one life we have.

The Thanksgiving Megapack, 35 Holiday Classics for Thanksgiving by various authors (Format: eBook):

Thanksgiving is an American tradition, celebrating the coming of autumn, the bounty of the harvest, the peaceful coexistence of the Pilgrims and the Native Americans, football, family—and, of course, the obligatory celebration feast. Here are 35 tales celebrating Thanksgiving in all its forms, by classic authors you know and love (O. Henry, Harriet Becher Stowe, Nathaniel Hawthorne) and others who may be new to you.

A cornucopia of Thanksgiving old-time stories are featured in this collection including:

TWO THANKSGIVING DAY GENTLEMEN, by O. Henry

SKINNY’S TURKEY DINNER, by Mary E. Marcy

EZRA’S THANKSGIVIN’ OUT WEST, by Eugene Field

WHO ATE THE DOLLY’S DINNER? by Isabel Gordon Curtis

THANKFUL, by Mary Wilkins Freeman

BEETLE RING’S THANKSGIVING MASCOT, by Sheldon C. Stoddard

THANKSGIVING AT TODD’S ASYLUM, by Winthrop Packard

HOW WE KEPT THANKSGIVING AT OLDTOWN, by Harriet Beecher Stowe

JOHN INGLEFIELD’S THANKSGIVING, by Nathaniel Hawthorne

HOW OBADIAH BROUGHT ABOUT A THANKSGIVING, by Emily Hewitt Leland

TWO OLD BOYS, by Pauline Shackleford Colyar

A THANKSGIVING DINNER THAT FLEW AWAY, by Hezekiah Butterworth

Print Suggestions Of The Week:

Beauchamp Hall: A Novel by Danielle Steel:

#1 New York Times bestselling author Danielle Steel tells the uplifting story of an ordinary woman embracing an extraordinary adventure, and the daring choice that transforms her world.

Winona Farmington once dreamed of graduating from college, moving to New York City, and pursuing a career in publishing. Then real life got in the way when she left college and returned to her small Michigan hometown to care for her sick mother.

Years later, stuck in a dead-end job and an unsatisfying relationship, Winnie has concluded that dreams were meant for others. She consoles herself with binge-watching the British television series that she loves, Beauchamp Hall, enthralled by the sumptuous period drama set on a great Norfolk estate in the 1920s. The rich upstairs-downstairs world brilliantly brought to life by superb actors is the ultimate in escapism.

On the day Winnie is passed over for a long-overdue promotion, she is also betrayed by her boyfriend and her best friend. Heartbroken, she makes the first impulsive decision of her conventional life—which changes everything.

She packs her bags and flies to England to see the town where Beauchamp Hall is filmed. The quaint B & B where she stays feels like home. The brother and sister who live in the castle where the show is filmed, rich in titles but poor in cash, are more like long-lost friends than British nobility. And the show itself, with its colorful company and behind-the-scenes affairs, is a drama all its own. Winnie’s world comes alive on the set of the show.

What happens next is the stuff of dreams, as Winnie takes the boldest leap of all. Beauchamp Hall reminds us to follow our dreams. . . . You never know what magic will happen!

Kingdom Of The Blind by Louise Penny:

When a peculiar letter arrives inviting Armand Gamache to an abandoned farmhouse, the former head of the Sûreté du Québec discovers that a complete stranger has named him one of the executors of her will. Still on suspension, and frankly curious, Gamache accepts and soon learns that the other two executors are Myrna Landers, the bookseller from Three Pines, and a young builder.

None of them had ever met the elderly woman.

The will is so odd and includes bequests that are so wildly unlikely that Gamache and the others suspect the woman must have been delusional. But what if, Gamache begins to ask himself, she was perfectly sane?

When a body is found, the terms of the bizarre will suddenly seem less peculiar and far more menacing.

But it isn’t the only menace Gamache is facing.

The investigation into what happened six months ago―the events that led to his suspension―has dragged on, into the dead of winter. And while most of the opioids he allowed to slip through his hands, in order to bring down the cartels, have been retrieved, there is one devastating exception.

Enough narcotic to kill thousands has disappeared into inner city Montreal. With the deadly drug about to hit the streets, Gamache races for answers.

As he uses increasingly audacious, even desperate, measures to retrieve the drug, Armand Gamache begins to see his own blind spots. And the terrible things hiding there.

Look Alive by Janet Evanovich:

Stephanie Plum faces the toughest puzzle of her career in the twenty-fifth entry in Janet Evanovich’s #1 New York Times-bestselling series.

There’s nothing like a good deli, and the Red River Deli in Trenton is one of the best. World-famous for its pastrami, cole slaw, and for its disappearing managers. Over the last month, three have vanished from the face of the earth, and the only clue in each case is one shoe that’s been left behind. The police are baffled. Lula is convinced that it’s a case of alien abduction. Whatever it is, they’d better figure out what’s going on before they lose their new manager, Ms. Stephanie Plum.

Night Of Miracles: A Novel by Elizabeth Berg:

The feel-good book of the year: a delightful novel of friendship, community, and the way small acts of kindness can change your life, by the bestselling author of The Story of Arthur Truluv

Lucille Howard is getting on in years, but she stays busy. Thanks to the inspiration of her dearly departed friend Arthur Truluv, she has begun to teach baking classes, sharing the secrets to her delicious classic Southern yellow cake, the perfect pinwheel cookies, and other sweet essentials. Her classes have become so popular that she’s hired Iris, a new resident of Mason, Missouri, as an assistant. Iris doesn’t know how to bake but she needs to keep her mind off a big decision she sorely regrets.

When a new family moves in next door and tragedy strikes, Lucille begins to look out for Lincoln, their son. Lincoln’s parents aren’t the only ones in town facing hard choices and uncertain futures. In these difficult times, the residents of Mason come together and find the true power of community—just when they need it the most.

“Elizabeth Berg’s characters jump right off the page and into your heart” said Fannie Flagg about The Story of Arthur Truluv. The same could be said about Night of Miracles, a heartwarming novel that reminds us that the people we come to love are often the ones we don’t expect.

A Scandal In Scarlet by Vicki Delany:

Sherlockians will delight at the latest charming installment of national bestselling author Vicki Delany’s fourth Sherlock Holmes Bookshop mystery.

Gemma and Jayne donate their time to raise money for the rebuilding of a burned out museum―but a killer wants a piece of the auction.

Walking her dog Violet late one night, Gemma Doyle, owner of the Sherlock Holmes Bookshop, acts quickly when she smells smoke outside the West London Museum. Fortunately no one is inside, but it’s too late to save the museum’s priceless collection of furniture, and damage to the historic house is extensive. Baker Street’s shop owners come together to hold an afternoon auction tea to raise funds to rebuild, and

Great Uncle Arthur Doyle offers a signed first edition of The Valley of Fear.

Cape Cod’s cognoscenti files into Mrs. Hudson’s Tea Room, owned by Gemma’s best friend, Jayne Wilson. Excitement fills the air (along with the aromas of Jayne’s delightful scones, of course). But the auction never happens. Before the gavel can fall, museum board chair Kathy Lamb is found dead in the back room. Wrapped tightly around her neck is a long rope of decorative knotted tea cups―a gift item that Jayne sells at Mrs. Hudson’s. Gemma’s boyfriend in blue, Ryan Ashburton, arrives on the scene with Detective Louise Estrada. But the suspect list is long, and the case far from elementary. Does Kathy’s killing have any relation to a mysterious death of seven years ago?

Gemma has no intention of getting involved in the investigation, but when fellow shopkeeper Maureen finds herself the prime suspect she begs Gemma for her help. Ryan knows Gemma’s methods and he isn’t happy when she gets entangled in another mystery. But with so many suspects and so few clues, her deductive prowess will prove invaluable in A Scandal in Scarlet, Vicki Delany’s shrewdly plotted fourth Sherlock Holmes Bookshop mystery.

Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day:

RBDigital

Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available.

About Library Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.

November is Native American Heritage Month – Focus On DVDs

This is week 3 of our November Did You Know postings.

As mentioned in previous postings, November is Native American Heritage month; last week our suggested reading titles were all non-fiction. This week our focus is on DVDs – both fiction and documentaries.

Recommended DVDs:

Crooked Arrows (2012)

A mixed-blood Native American; Joe Logan; eager to modernize his reservation; must first prove himself to his father; the traditionalist Tribal Chairman; by rediscovering his spirit. He is tasked with coaching the reservation’s high school lacrosse team which competes against the better equipped and better trained players of the elite Prep School League. Joe inspires the Native American boys and teaches them the true meaning of tribal pride. Ignited by their heritage and believing in their new-found potential; coach and team climb an uphill battle to the state championship finals against their privileged prep school rivals – will they win?

Crooked Arrows is an original; uplifting sports movie in the tradition of such classics as Mighty Ducks; Bad News Bears; Hoosiers; and Bend It Like Beckhamaset in the fresh; contemporary worlds of Native American reservations; prep schools; and lacrosse.

Dreamkeeper (2004):

Dreamkeeper tells the story of a resentful Lakota teenager (Eddie Spears) who reluctantly agrees to drive his wise elderly grandfather (August Schellenberg) from their “rez” in South Dakota to a to national Powwow in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

While en route the grandfather, who is the dreamkeeping storyteller for his tribe, tells traditional stories/folklore to his grandson who is transformed from a resistant teen to a proud storyteller himself.

Incident at Oglala: The Leonard Peltier Story (2004):

In 1975, armed FBI agents illegally entered the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Gunfire erupted- a Native American and two FBI agents fell dead. After the largest manhunt in FBI history, three men were apprehended- only one, Leonard Peltier, was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

This is his story.

From the very beginning, Pelter’s case has been dogged with controversy. Were the charged trumped up? Was the evidence falsified? Were witnesses pressured to change their testimony? Many people, including some of today’s greatest legal minds, believe that Peltier is an innocent man. Twelve years ago, Robert Redford visited Leonard Peltier in prison. Today, after years of struggle with the FBI and the prison system, he and director Michael Apted (GORILLAS IN THE MIST, COAL MINER’S DAUGHTER) are able to present INCIDENT AT OGLALA- a riveting examination of the case and the real story of what may be one of the most outrageous abuses of justice in American history.

Jim Thorpe: The World’s Greatest Athlete (2009):

Born on Native American territory in Oklahoma; a descendant of the last great Sac and Fox chief, Black Hawk—his Indian name, Wa-tho-huck or “Bright Path”—something Jim Thorpe certainly lived up to in a time of hardship and stigmas for Native Americans. Thorpe’s athletic career began at the Carlisle Industrial Indian School where he played football and ran track. His natural athletic abilities are what legends are made of, no matter the sport, he excelled at it. In the 1912 Summer Olympics, Thorpe went on to win gold medals in the decathlon and pentathlon; which were later recalled due to his questionable amateur athlete status, but reinstated after his death. In a 2000 poll conducted by ABC Sports, Jim Thorpe was voted the Greatest Athlete of the Twentieth Century, beating out other greats such as Muhammed Ali and Babe Ruth.

Jim Thorpe was more than a legendary and accomplished athlete; he worked as an extra in the movie industry, travelled as a motivational speaker, and fought tirelessly as an activist for Native American rights and self-sufficiency. During WWII, in 1945, he even enlisted as a merchant marine.

Our Spirits Don’t Speak English (2008):

Our Spirits Don’t Speak English: Indian Boarding School is a Native American perspective on Indian Boarding Schools. This DVD produced by Rich-Heape Films, Inc. uncovers the dark history of U.S. Government policy which took Indian children from their homes, forced them into boarding schools and enacted a policy of educating them in the ways of Western Society. This DVD gives a voice to the countless Indian children forced through a system designed to strip them of their Native American culture, heritage and traditions.

Rumble! Indians That Rocked The World (2017):

This revelatory documentary brings to light a profound and missing chapter in the history of American music: the Indigenous influence. Featuring music icons like Charley Patton, Mildred Bailey, Link Wray, Jimi Hendrix, Jesse Ed Davis, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Robbie Robertson, Randy Castillo, and Taboo, RUMBLE shows how these pioneering Native musicians helped shape the soundtracks of our lives. RUMBLE uses playful re-creations and little-known stories, alongside concert footage, archives, and interviews. The stories of these iconic Native musicians are told by some of America`s greatest music legends who knew them, played music with them, and were inspired with them: everyone from Stevie Van Zandt, Iggy Pop, and Steven Tyler to Tony Bennett, Quincy Jones and Buddy Guy. Popular music and the history of rock and roll itself certainly would not have been the same without the contributions of Native Americans. RUMBLE was executive produced by Stevie Salas (Apache), celebrated guitarist and music producer, and museum exhibitions and programs executive Tim Johnson (Mohawk), formerly of the Smithsonian NMAI.

Smoke Signals (1998):

Based on a couple of short stories (from The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven) by Sherman Alexie, Smoke Signals is a lean and assured feature that speaks well of its lengthy, rich evolution, including a development stint at Sundance. The first feature made by a Native American crew and creative team, the film concerns two young Idaho men with radically different memories of one Arnold Joseph (Gary Farmer), a former resident of the reservation who split years before and has just died in Phoenix. Arnold’s strapping, popular son, Victor (Adam Beach), remembers him best as an alcoholic, occasionally abusive father who drove off one day and never came back. By contrast, Thomas Builds-the-Fire (Evan Adams), whom Arnold had saved from certain death years earlier, has chosen to exaggerate the man’s life and deeds in a mythmaking fashion that drives Victor crazy. Circumstances bring the two together, however, in a bus ride to retrieve Arnold’s ashes. There, in Phoenix, a confrontation with the reality of the dead man’s fullest legacy has a profound effect on both characters. Alexie, who wrote the script and was personally involved in all aspects of the production, and first-time director Chris Eyre are so polished in their approach that you can barely feel the cinematic engine at work here. This is the kind of movie in which the characters seem to be driving everything forward, a captivating and pleasant experience that gets a little too tidy at the end (can we call a moratorium on scenes of human ashes lovingly disposed to the winds?), but which is undeniably moving. The cast, including Irene Bedard (the voice of and physical inspiration for Disney’s Pocahontas) is outstanding. –Tom Keogh, Amazon Review

Spirit Rider (1993):

Without warning, a 16 year-old Native American orphan is uprooted from his latest foster home and returned to the reservation of his birth. He slowly begins to adjust to his new life with his grandfather, but someone who knows the awful secret surrounding his mother’s death is determined to destroy his newfound happiness. For the two adversaries, an annual horse race culminates in a life-and-death struggle that could finish them both.

We Shall Remain (2009):

From PBS’s acclaimed history series, American Experience, in association with Native American Public Telecommunications, We Shall Remain establishes Native history as an essential part of American history. These documentaries tell the story of the Native Americans’ perspective, upending two-dimensional stereotypes of American Indians as simply ferocious warriors or peaceable lovers of the land.

Have a great day!

Linda, SSCL

Suggested Listening November 16, 2018

Hi everyone, and just a bit late, here are our lucky seven musical recommendations that should have been posted last Friday but which were delayed by the arrival of Winter Story Avery.

Our lucky seven suggested listens include five streaming suggestions* and two recommended albums on CD.

(Click on the photo to stream or request the album you’re interested in!)

Freegal Streaming Suggestions*

Black Velvet (2018) by Charles Bradley (Genre: R&B, Pop):

Charles Bradley’s new album, Black Velvet is an extraordinary collection of 10 tracks making their LP debut. In addition to fan favorites like Charles covers of Nirvanas ‘Stay Away’, Neil Young’s ‘Heart Of Gold’, and Rodriguez’s ‘Slip Away’ – this album features 4 never-before-heard tracks from Producer Tommy ‘TNT’ Brenneck’s vaults.

Additional songs on the LP include: Luv Jones, Can’t Fight the Feeling, I Feel a Change, Slip Away and Black Velvet.

Shirley Inspired (2015) by Various Artists (Genre: Folk, Pop, Rock):

Shirley Collins, for those not familiar with her work, is to the sixties English folk scene what Joan Baez is to the sixties American folk scene. She’s got a great voice and recorded prolifically from 1959 into the early seventies when folk music, regrettable, fell out of main stream pop music favor.
This is a tribute album, a digital version of the 3 LP release, featuring 12 extra tracks. This LP compliments the British documentary, The Ballad of Shirley Collins, which chronicles the career of this classic British folk singer.

Here’s a description of the album which was originally released in 2015:

Shirley Collins celebrate her 80th year – an age that would seem frankly ridiculous for a woman as spritely as her, had it not been for all she’s achieved. From her seminal field-recording trip to America to her lauded musical career; from her role as historian and protector of the folk tradition, to the very fact that this record can exist – more than half a century after her career began – all of these things are testament to the breadth of her influence. And so we arrive at ‘Shirley Inspired’. It would be almost lazy to the talk about the resurgence of folk music or the ‘new folk’ sound – the recordings found here are so much more than that. This is the very essence of folk – songs handed down from person to person, interpreted by modern musicians – as a way of keeping these songs alive.

Originally released on deluxe 3 LP gatefold, this CD/digital versions enjoys 12 more stunning interpretations, including contributions from Paul Armfield, Jack Sharp (Wolf People), Rob St. John and Elle Osborne. Make no mistake these are modern versions; we’ve the soulful dirge of Bitchin Bonnie Billy Bajas’ ‘Pretty Saro’; the rabble-rousing minimalism of Stewart Lee (yes him) and Stuart Estell’s ‘Polly On The Shore’; the prism-like vocals of Ela Stiles’ ‘Murder of Maria Marten’… even Graham Coxon’s traditional affair evokes something altogether more rebellious, his clawing, feral style is much in evidence here. This compilation was an inheritance of sorts: borne to us from the kickstarter appeal that funded ‘The Ballad of Shirley Collins’ – a film that is currently being made about the First Lady of Folk Music’s life. We here at Earth now have the privilege of giving these songs a tangible existence in the shape of this special recording. The woman herself had this to say: “I’ve been overwhelmed by the generosity of the singers and musicians who responded to the invitation to be part of the Shirley Inspired collection. Their choice of songs is fascinating, the interpretations of them fresh and various, beautiful and sometimes challenging! Listening to these recreations shows me again that English folk music has timeless power and significance.”

Rite The First Time (2001) by The Weird Sisters (Genre: Folk):

The Weird Sisters are a folk group from Atlanta, Georgia. The band consists of Gwen Knighton, Brenda Sinclair Sutton, Teresa Gibson Powell and Mary Crowell.

Rite The First Time is their debut album and includes the following songs: In A Gown Too Blue, Spring Strathspey, Song Of Fey Cross, Iowa, Absolutely Bonkers, The Bird Rock and a great version of Cheryl Wheeler’s When Fall Comes To New England.

Roogalator on BBC John Peel Radio Show by Danny Adler (Genre: Roots Rock, Blues, Rock):

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1949, Danny Adler is firmly established among the finest blues guitarists of the rock & roll era, a solidly original stylist whose early exposure to the jazz and R&B scenes of his hometown was quick to explode into a thoroughly individual style. The string of albums he kicked off in the mid-’70s with his band Roogalator, and which continues through to 2012’s multi-disc Archive series of retrospectives, remains a work of constant rediscovery, both for veteran fans and the new audience that has discovered him through the Internet.

In addition, Adler has played alongside some of rock’s most storied names, including stints in Charlie Watts’ Rocket 88 with Ian Stewart, Jack Bruce, and Alexis Korner, and the Deluxe Blues Band with Bob Brunning and Mickey Waller. He was a founding member of Dave Edmunds and Nick Lowe’s Disco Brothers studio band in 1975, and many more.

Gigging around Ohio, Adler made his professional debut in Amos Milburn’s band, a setup which broadened his musical exposure by placing him on-stage with legends Chuck Berry, Memphis Slim, Slim Harpo, Arthur Crudup, and T-Bone Walker, among others. Another early band, the Blues Doctors, can be heard on the first volume of the Archive series, and includes a number of the guitarist’s earliest compositions. A stint in California in the late ’60s was followed by relocation to New York City, where Adler was a member of Elephant’s Memory, cutting the “Skyscraper Commando” single with them, but departing shortly before the band’s union with John and Yoko.

Moving to Europe, Adler performed across the musical spectrum, swinging from Ginger Johnson’s African Drummers to the Irish country circuit; studying jazz guitar in Paris and then forming the proto-glam band Smooth Loser with Jeff Pasternak, brother of the popular U.K. disc jockey Emperor Rosko. Smooth Loser recorded a handful of sessions (available now on volume three of the Archive series), including an excellent session at 10cc’s Strawberry Studios. Despite the band’s connections, however, no deal was forthcoming and Adler quit to form a new band, Roogalator, in 1973.

Several lineup changes later, Roogalator were being feted as the next big thing by the pre-punk U.K. press, touring with Dr. Feelgood and signing with the fledgling Stiff Records for 1976’s legendary All Aboard single. Momentum was lost, however, when Stiff was forced to withdraw the single’s picture sleeve over copyright issues, and when Roogalator resurfaced, the musical climate had changed dramatically. Bands that had once opened for Roogalator, the Sex Pistols and the Clash included, were the new media heroes, and while Roogalator rocked on, it was a very different band that cut their debut album.

Unlucky when the much-loved 45 “Love and the Single Girl” flopped, Roogalator broke up in 1979, Adler moved into session work at the same time as becoming a founding member of Rocket 88. The Deluxe Blues Band followed, and the two groups who were a constant presence on the U.K. club scene of the early to mid-’80s.

The Danny Adler Band swiftly joined them and a staggering discography followed, the four Deluxe Blues Band albums (A Streetcar Named De Luxe and Live at Half Moon Putney, both 1981; Urban DeLuxe in 1983; and Motorvating in 1988) being joined by no less than nine solo and band LPs, all released to critical acclaim in Europe throughout the ’80s: Funky Afternoons (1979), Gusha Gusha Music (1980), Live (1982), an eponymous set (1983), Hubcap Heaven (1986), Hometowns and High Iron (1987), Night Shift (1987), Mackinaw City (1989), and Homestretch (1990). In addition, Adler also pulled off one of the great blues hoaxes of the decade, with the “discovery” of Otis “Elevator” Gilmore in 1986 — an unknown legend of the blues whose true identity, Adler himself, eluded many otherwise impeccable scholars.

Adler returned to the U.S. in the early ’90s, fading from invisibility somewhat, but remaining a breathtaking performer on the occasions when he did resurface; the live album Jazzin at RVGs, from 1993, is a dynamic performance, and in 1999, Adler returned to action with the Mother’s Day CD. Boat Diddley followed, while Adler has also been active remastering both his back catalog and a voluminous archive for the much-acclaimed Archive series. He also engineered a 2011 Roogalator live reunion in the U.K., while 2012 brought the single “Political Dancing.” ~ Dave Thompson, iTunes

Songs on the LP include: Ride with the Roogalator, Tasty 2, Cincinnati Fatback, All Board, Sock It to My Pocket, Sweet Mama Kundalini and, T.G.I.F

Source by Benny Green (Genre: Jazz, Piano):

Benny Green led a popular trio from near the beginning of his career to around 2000, when he abruptly disbanded, not leading a band for a decade, aside from some duo recordings with guitarist Russell Malone. But a recording session with the rhythm team of bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington to accompany guitarist Satoshi Inoue rekindled the fire in the pianist’s belly, resulting in this outstanding session. The two Washingtons have worked together frequently during their careers, while Green is on fire interacting with them. The ten pieces are all works by jazz composers, including both well-known and obscure works. It’s little surprise to hear Green tackling Bud Powell’s furious bop anthem “Tempus Fugue-It”; the veteran pianist indulges in fireworks and engages his drummer trading fours, while he also delivers a rollicking treatment of Horace Silver’s “Opus de Funk.” Mel Tormé’s lush, bittersweet ballad “Born to Be Blue” is also in good hands, with Green’s adept use of the sustaining pedal adding to the mood. The less-familiar songs are equally delightful. Green captures the loneliness of walking Manhattan streets late at night with his shimmering rendition of Benny Golson’s “Park Avenue Petite.” Aside from “Grooveyard,” Carl Perkins’ songs have been overlooked, but Green turns in an infectious, choppy version of this hard bop vehicle, winding it up with an unresolved ending. The trio of Benny Green, Peter Washington, and Kenny Washington could easily be the start of something big. Ken Dryden, AllMusic Review

Recommended CDs of the Week:

Country For Old Men (2016) by John Scofield (Genre: Jazz, Guitar, Instrumental):

Jazz guitarist John Schofield’s shows his love of country music by covering songs made famous by country artists including Dolly Parton, Hank Williams and Merle Haggard. For this recording Scofield is accompanied by drummer Bill Stewart, pianist/organist Larry Goldings and bassist Steve Swallow.

Some of the vintage country songs on the LP include: Mama Tried, Red River Valley, I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry, Wildwood Flower and Jolene.

In The Midnight Hour (1965) & The Exciting Wilson Pickett (1966) by Wilson Pickett (Genre: Soul, R&B):

This double album set features the second and third albums released by the great soul singer Wilson Pickett. These albums show him just hitting his substantial musical stride!

Songs include: In The Midnight Hour, Teardrops Will Fall, I Found A Love, Come Home Baby, Let’s Kiss and Make Up, Land of 1000 Dances, 634-5789, Mercy Mercy, You’re So Fine and She’s So Good To Me.

Videos of the Week:

I Feel A Change by Charles Bradley

The Blacksmith by Ned Oldham

Rambleaway by Shirley Collins

All Aboard by Roogalator

Blue Minor by Benny Green

Land of 1000 Dances by Wilson Pickett

Mr. Fool / The Gambler by John Scofield (New Morning – Paris – March 22nd 2017)

Have a great weekend!

Linda, SSCL

*A library card is required to use the Freegal Music Service. If you live in the service area of the Southern Tier Library System, which consists of the public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Alleghany counties in New York State, you can get a library card for free at your nearest public library – including our own Southeast Steuben County Library in Corning, New York. The Freegal Music Service is free for all Southern Tier Library System member libraries library card holders to access.

References:

Artist Biography & Discography Information:

http://www.allmusic.com/

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn (Billboard Books. New York. 2009.)

P.S. If you have any questions about how to download or stream free music through the Freegal Music service to a desktop or laptop computer or how to download and use the Freegal Music app let us know! Drop by the library or give us a call at: 607-936-3713

*You must have a library card at a Southern Tier Library System member library to enjoy the Freegal Music Service. Your card can be from any library in the system, and the system includes all public libraries in Steuben, Chemung, Yates, Schuyler and Allegheny Counties and includes our own Southeast Steuben Count Library in Corning, New York!

Library cards are free if you live in our service area. And you can obtain a card by visiting the Circulation Desk and presenting staff with a form of ID that features your name and your current address.

Links to the desktop versions of the catalogs for the library system – apps for each are available in your app store:

Digital Library Catalogs:

Freegal offers streaming and downloadable music

OverDrive allows you to check out eBooks, downloadable audiobooks and handful of streaming videos

RB Digital is the place you go to check out magazines – on demand – and you never have to return them!

The Traditional Library Catalog:

You can search for and request books, DVDs, music CDs, audiobooks on CD and other physical format items through StarCat – it is the modern day card catalog!

Suggested Reading November 12, 2018

Hi everyone, here are our recommended titles for the week, for last week!

Apologies for the delay in posting; between vacation days and our charming inclement weather at the end of last week, this is my first chance to finish it.

So here are the suggested reads for last week and I’ll post the recommended titles for this week on Wednesday.

(Note: Click on the photo of the item you’d like to request or check out)

Digital Suggestions Of The Week For Last Week:

The Comedians, Drunks, Thieves, Scoundrels, and the History of American Comedy by Kliph Nesteroff (Format: eBook):

“Funny [and] fascinating . . . If you’re a comedy nerd you’ll love this book” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette).

Named a Best Book of the Year by Kirkus Reviews, National Post, and Splitsider

Based on over two hundred original interviews and extensive archival research, this groundbreaking work is a narrative exploration of the way comedians have reflected, shaped, and changed American culture over the past one hundred years.

Starting with the vaudeville circuit at the turn of the last century, the book introduces the first stand-up comedian—an emcee who abandoned physical shtick for straight jokes. After the repeal of Prohibition, Mafia-run supper clubs replaced speakeasies, and mobsters replaced vaudeville impresarios as the comedian’s primary employer. In the 1950s, the late-night talk show brought stand-up to a wide public, while Lenny Bruce, Mort Sahl, and Jonathan Winters attacked conformity and staged a comedy rebellion in coffeehouses. From comedy’s part in the Civil Rights movement and the social upheaval of the late 1960s, to the first comedy clubs of the 1970s and the cocaine-fueled comedy boom of the 1980s, The Comedians culminates with a new era of media-driven celebrity in the twenty-first century.

“Entertaining and carefully documented . . . jaw-dropping anecdotes . . . This book is a real treat.” —Merrill Markoe, The Wall Street Journal

Damsel by Elana K. Arnold (Format: eBook):

A dark, twisted, unforgettable fairy tale from Elana K. Arnold, author of the National Book Award finalist What Girls Are Made Of.

The rite has existed for as long as anyone can remember: When the king dies, his son the prince must venture out into the gray lands, slay a fierce dragon, and rescue a damsel to be his bride. This is the way things have always been.

When Ama wakes in the arms of Prince Emory, she knows none of this. She has no memory of what came before she was captured by the dragon or what horrors she faced in its lair. She knows only this handsome young man, the story he tells of her rescue, and her destiny of sitting on a throne beside him. It’s all like a dream, like something from a fairy tale.

As Ama follows Emory to the kingdom of Harding, however, she discovers that not all is as it seems. There is more to the legends of the dragons and the damsels than anyone knows, and the greatest threats may not be behind her, but around her, now, and closing in.

Jack Of Spades by Joyce Carol Oates (Format: eBook): 

An exquisite, psychologically complex thriller about opposing forces within the mind of one ambitious writer and the delicate line between genius and madness.

Andrew J. Rush has achieved the kind of critical and commercial success most authors only dream about: He has a top agent and publisher in New York, and his twenty-eight mystery novels have sold millions of copies. Only Stephen King, one of the few mystery writers whose fame exceeds his own, is capable of inspiring a twinge of envy in Rush. But Rush is hiding a dark secret. Under the pseudonym “Jack of Spades,” he pens another string of novels—noir thrillers that are violent, lurid, masochistic. These are novels that the upstanding Rush wouldn’t be caught reading, let alone writing. When his daughter comes across a Jack of Spades novel he has carelessly left out, she picks it up and begins to ask questions. Meanwhile, Rush receives a court summons in the mail explaining that a local woman has accused him of plagiarizing her own self-published fiction. Before long, Rush’s reputation, career, and family life all come under threat—and in his mind he begins to hear the taunting voice of the Jack of Spades.

“Sleek and suspenseful . . . Readers are sure to be gripped and unsettled by [Oates’s] depiction of a seemingly mild-mannered character whose psychopathology simmers frighteningly close to the surface.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Just when you think you’ve got her all figured out, Joyce Carol Oates sneaks up behind and confounds you yet again. She does it with a wicked flourish in Jack of Spades.” —The New York Times Book Review

The Vineyard Victims, Wine Country Mystery Series, Book 8 written by Ellen Crosby & read by Christine Marshall (Format: Downloadable Audiobook):

The death of a former presidential candidate in a fiery car crash at her Virginia vineyard has ties to a thirty-year-old murder, as well as to Lucie Montgomery’s own near-fatal accident ten years ago, as she searches for a killer who now may be stalking her.

When Jamison Vaughn-billionaire real-estate mogul, Virginia vineyard owner, and unsuccessful US presidential candidate-drives his gold SUV into a stone pillar at the entrance to Montgomery Estate Vineyard, Lucie Montgomery is certain the crash was deliberate. But everyone else in Atoka, Virginia, is equally sure that Jamie must have lost control of his car on a rain-slicked country road. In spite of being saddled with massive campaign debts from the recent election, Jamie is seemingly the man with the perfect life. What possible reason could he have for committing suicide? Or was it murder?

Before long, Lucie uncovers a connection between Jamie and some of his old friends, an elite group of academics, and the brutal murder thirty years ago of a brilliant PhD student. Although a handyman is on death row for the crime, Lucie soon suspects someone else is guilty. But the investigation into the two deaths throws Lucie a curve ball when someone from her own past becomes involved, forcing her to confront old demons. Now the race to solve the mystery behind the two deaths becomes intensely personal as Lucie realizes someone wants her silenced-for good.

Written in Red, The Anna Hopkins Mysteries, Book 2 by Annie Dalton (Format: eBook):

The murder of a college professor uncovers long-buried Cold War secrets in this “suspense-filled” mystery in the Oxford Dogwalkers’ series (Booklist).

Shortly before Christmas, Professor James Lowell is found brutally attacked in his rooms at Walsingham College, where dog-lover Anna Hopkins works as an administrator. Baffled as to why anyone would wish to harm such a gentle scholar, Anna discovers that her fellow dog walker, Isadora Salzman, knew Lowell as an undergraduate in the 1960s. They were both members of the so-called Oxford Six—and it seems that Isadora has been keeping a surprising secret all these years. But someone else knows about Isadora’s secret: someone who has sent her a threatening, frightening letter.

Could the attack on Professor Lowell have its roots in a fifty-year-old murder? And who is targeting Isadora and the surviving members of the Oxford Six? Anna, Isadora, and Tansy, the dog walking detectives, make it their business to find out.

This mystery series for adult readers is an intriguing new departure for award-winning YA writer Annie Dalton. Dalton is the author of more than 30 novels for children and young adults, including the Agent Angel series. She has twice been shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal.

“This taut . . . nail-biter of a mystery is chock-full of surprises and will appeal to a wide range of mystery lovers.” —Booklist

“Dog lovers will enjoy the canine interludes.” —Publishers Weekly

Print Suggestions Of The Week For Last Week:

Almost Everything: Notes On Hope by Anne Lamott:

From Anne Lamott, the New York Times-bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow, comes the book we need from her now: How to bring hope back into our lives.

“I am stockpiling antibiotics for the Apocalypse, even as I await the blossoming of paperwhites on the windowsill in the kitchen,” Anne Lamott admits at the beginning of Almost Everything. Despair and uncertainty surround us: in the news, in our families, and in ourselves. But even when life is at its bleakest–when we are, as she puts it, “doomed, stunned, exhausted, and over-caffeinated”–the seeds of rejuvenation are at hand. “All truth is paradox,” Lamott writes, “and this turns out to be a reason for hope. If you arrive at a place in life that is miserable, it will change.” That is the time when we must pledge not to give up but “to do what Wendell Berry wrote: ‘Be joyful, though you have considered all the facts.'”

In this profound and funny book, Lamott calls for each of us to rediscover the nuggets of hope and wisdom that are buried within us that can make life sweeter than we ever imagined. Divided into short chapters that explore life’s essential truths, Almost Everything pinpoints these moments of insight as it shines an encouraging light forward.
Candid and caring, insightful and sometimes hilarious, Almost Everything is the book we need and that only Anne Lamott can write.

Elevation by Stephen King:

The latest from legendary master storyteller Stephen King, a riveting, extraordinarily eerie, and moving story about a man whose mysterious affliction brings a small town together—a timely, upbeat tale about finding common ground despite deep-rooted differences.

Although Scott Carey doesn’t look any different, he’s been steadily losing weight. There are a couple of other odd things, too. He weighs the same in his clothes and out of them, no matter how heavy they are. Scott doesn’t want to be poked and prodded. He mostly just wants someone else to know, and he trusts Doctor Bob Ellis.

In the small town of Castle Rock, the setting of many of King’s most iconic stories, Scott is engaged in a low grade—but escalating—battle with the lesbians next door whose dog regularly drops his business on Scott’s lawn. One of the women is friendly; the other, cold as ice. Both are trying to launch a new restaurant, but the people of Castle Rock want no part of a gay married couple, and the place is in trouble. When Scott finally understands the prejudices they face–including his own—he tries to help. Unlikely alliances, the annual foot race, and the mystery of Scott’s affliction bring out the best in people who have indulged the worst in themselves and others.

From Stephen King, our “most precious renewable resource, like Shakespeare in the malleability of his work” (The Guardian), Elevation is an antidote to our divisive culture, as gloriously joyful (with a twinge of deep sadness) as “It’s a Wonderful Life.”

Merry And Bright by Debbie Macomber:

Merry Knight is pretty busy these days. She’s taking care of her family, baking cookies, decorating for the holidays, and hoping to stay out of the crosshairs of her stressed and by-the-book boss at the consulting firm where she temps. Her own social life is the last thing she has in mind, much less a man. Without her knowledge, Merry’s well-meaning mom and brother create an online dating profile for her—minus her photo—and the matches start rolling in. Initially, Merry is incredulous, but she reluctantly decides to give it a whirl.

Soon Merry finds herself chatting with a charming stranger, a man with similar interests and an unmistakably kind soul. Their online exchanges become the brightest part of her day. But meeting face-to-face is altogether different, and her special friend is the last person Merry expects—or desires. Still, sometimes hearts can see what our eyes cannot. In this satisfying seasonal tale, unanticipated love is only a click away.

Past Tense by Lee Child:

Family secrets come back to haunt Jack Reacher in this electrifying thriller from #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child, “a superb craftsman of suspense” (Entertainment Weekly).

Jack Reacher hits the pavement and sticks out his thumb. He plans to follow the sun on an epic trip across America, from Maine to California. He doesn’t get far. On a country road deep in the New England woods, he sees a sign to a place he has never been: the town where his father was born. He thinks, What’s one extra day? He takes the detour.

At the same moment, in the same isolated area, a car breaks down. Two young Canadians had been on their way to New York City to sell a treasure. Now they’re stranded at a lonely motel in the middle of nowhere. The owners seem almost too friendly. It’s a strange place, but it’s all there is.

The next morning, in the city clerk’s office, Reacher asks about the old family home. He’s told no one named Reacher ever lived in town. He’s always known his father left and never returned, but now Reacher wonders, Was he ever there in the first place?

As Reacher explores his father’s life, and as the Canadians face lethal dangers, strands of different stories begin to merge. Then Reacher makes a shocking discovery: The present can be tough, but the past can be tense . . . and deadly.

“Superb . . . [Lee] Child’s spare prose continues to set a very high bar.”—Publishers Weekly (boxed and starred review)

You Don’t Own Me by Mary Higgins Clark:

When we last saw Laurie Moran, she had recently become engaged to her show’s former host, Alex Buckley. Since then, the two have been happily planning a summer wedding and honeymoon, preparing for Alex’s confirmation to a federal judicial appointment, and searching for the perfect New York City home for their new life together.

But then Laurie is approached by Robert and Cynthia Bell, parents of Dr. Martin Bell, a famously charming and talented physician who was shot dead as he pulled into the driveway of his Greenwich Village carriage house five years ago. The Bells are sure that Martin’s disgraced and erratic wife, Kendra, carried out the murder. Determined to prove Kendra’s guilt and win custody over their grandchildren, they plead with Laurie to feature their son’s case on “Under Suspicion,” ensuring her that Kendra is willing to cooperate.

Kendra has lived under a blanket of suspicion since Martin’s death, with the tabloid media depicting her as a secretive, mentally unstable gold-digger. Laurie’s show is a chance for her to clear her name. But unbeknownst to the Bells, Kendra has already refused once before to go forward with a re-investigation of her husband’s murder, and her statements to the contrary only add to the appearance of guilt.

But once Laurie dives into the case, she learns that Martin wasn’t the picture-perfect husband, father, and doctor he appeared to be and was carrying secrets of his own. And what does the web of lies ensnaring the Bell family have to do with a dangerous stranger, who gazes at Laurie from afar and thinks, She is actually quite a lovely girl, I’m sure she’s going to be missed…?

You Don’t Own Me is the perfect, exhilarating follow up to the bestselling Every Breath You Take. The “Queen of Suspense” Mary Higgins Clark and her dazzling partner-in-crime Alafair Burke have devised another riveting page-turner.

Have a great week!

Linda, SSCL

Online Catalog Links:

StarCat

The catalog of physical materials, i.e. print books, DVDs, audiobooks on CD etc.

The Digital Catalog (OverDrive)

The catalog of e-books, downloadable audiobooks and a handful of streaming videos.

Freegal Music Service

This music service is free to library card holders and offers the option to download, and keep, three free songs per week and to stream three hours of commercial free music each day:

RBDigital

Digital magazines on demand and for free! Back issues are available and you can even choose to be notified by email when the new issue of your favorite magazine is available.

About Library Apps:

You can access digital library content on PCs, Macs and mobile devices. For mobile devices simply download the OverDrive, Freegal or Zinio app from your app store to get started. If you have questions call the library at: 607-936-3713 and one of our Digital Literacy Specialists will be happy to assist you.

Tech Talk is a Southeast Steuben County Library blog.