CBS & Time Warner Fight It Out Over Broadcast Fees: As you may have heard, CBS and Time Warner are having a rather vocal and public spat over broadcasting fees. CBS is insisting that Time Warner increase the amount it charges each customer for from $1 to $2 to receive broadcasts of its television shows; that may not sound like much but it is a 100% increase and Time Warner doesn’t want to pass that increase along to its customers. The ensuing dispute has translated into some Time Warner customer losing their access to CBS. This large storm not-in-a tea-cup but perhaps a large swimming pool isn’t impacting all Time Warner customers only those who receive CBS via stations owned by CBS and those stations are mainly in the Los Angeles and New York City areas.

However, I think this whole dispute is interesting because it shows how the traditional status video broadcasting quo is changing. Time Warner is certainly aware that as more and more people access video content through the web more people in general are less likely to pay to access video content via traditional cable TV services. And in fact there is a growing population of both “cord cutters” who have dropped their cable TV packages in favor of accessing video content via the web and “cord nevers” that term meaning young people who have grown up as Digital Natives who have never paid for cable television service; and now that they are now out and on their own – they don’t want to pay for cable service.  Those two groups of people are fine with just viewing online video content including some less expensive than most cable TV package options like subscribing to Netflix and Hulu Plus both of which offers web based access to their video libraries of television shows and movies for $7.99 a month.

And I think those factors show that the way many people are accessing video content is changing. There are more ways to watch video via the web than ever before and gone are the days when your local cable TV provider who provided you with access to ABC, NBC & CBS was the only way to go– and I think Time Warner sees this as in their dispute with CBS they have urged people in the New York area to subscribe to the Areo streaming video service to obtain CBS! However, I’m not sure CBS is quite with the new program yet as they still seem to be playing by the old rules that gave the networks almost supreme power in dictating how much they charged for their content and who could receive that content because they were the only game in town.

Here’s a link to a Gigaom article on this very subject which is aptly titled “CBS and Time Warner Cable bring new tricks to an old TV fight;”

http://gigaom.com/2013/08/05/cbs-and-time-warner-cable-bring-new-tricks-to-an-old-tv-fight-but-its-time-to-change-the-game/

Four Excellent Articles On The TV Revolution Already In Progress: And I found an another set of articles on the Gigaom site that nicely complements the first section of this blog posting because it too focuses on what we might call the “Television Revolution.” I define the TV Revolution as meaning the ways people can access video content through the web – in the form of television shows and movies as well as user generated content. Gigaom tech columnist Janko Roettgers offers four articles in a series all of which deal with the changing video landscape! The first article is from July 31 and is titled “Making TVs smart; why most smart TVs still feel pretty dumb” and it goes on to echo what Apple CEO Tim Cook said at the All Things D tech conference earlier this year that although modern technologies have transformed our lives in many ways the television experience of the American living room is still stuck in the past and that experience should be brought into the 21st century and made a simpler one – quite probably by ditching the use of traditional television remotes and using voice activated televisions or streaming boxes with microphone inputs so instead of having to click through the channels to find our favorite shows we can tell our television “Turn to PBS” or “bring up the latest episode of Arrested Development and play it” and presto the TV will do what we tell it to do sans remote! And no doubt we’ll also increasingly have more web accessed video options.

And I’ve digressed slightly! Getting back to the subject of the Gigaom articles; the second article is from August 2 and is titled “Making TVs smart: why TV app developers struggle to succeed in the living room” and it goes on to shed some light on the struggle of app and Internet video content creators like Netflix, with its “House of Cards” and “Hemlock Grove” TV series, as their new way of delivering video content via the web disrupts the traditional network and cable company status quo; the third article is titled “From DIAL to Chromecast: How Netflix and Google want to save TV” and it also discusses the TV revolution and the new Google Chromecast device; and the fourth and final article is from August 5th and is titled “From DIAL to Chromecast: How Netflix and Google want to save TV” and like the article mentioned in the first section of this blog posting it focuses on the fight between CBS and Time Warner over broadcast fees.

Here’s the link to article 1:

http://gigaom.com/2013/07/31/making-tvs-smart-part-one/

Article 2:

http://gigaom.com/2013/08/01/making-tvs-smart-part-two/

Article 3:

http://gigaom.com/2013/08/02/making-tvs-smart-part-3/

And article 4:

http://gigaom.com/2013/08/04/from-dial-to-chromecast-how-netflix-and-google-want-to-save-tv/

And on another tech note don’t forget you can receive free assistance in learning to use your personal technology device at the library! A member of our tech team can answer your questions regarding how to use  your smartphone, tablet, e-reader, laptop or other device. You can drop in with simple questions or call us to make an appointment for a free One-On-One session with a member of our tech staff! Did I mention this service is free? Call us @ 607-936-3713 to make an appointment today!

Have a great day!

Linda R.

References

Roberts, Jeff John. (2013, August 5). CBS and Time Warner Cable bring new tricks to an old TV fight. Gigaom. Online. Accessed August 5, 2013.

Roettgers, Janko. (2013, August 4). From DIAL to Chromecast: How Netflix and Google want to save TV. Gigaom. Online. Accessed August 5, 2013. http://gigaom.com/2013/08/04/from-dial-to-chromecast-how-netflix-and-google-want-to-save-tv/

Roettgers, Janko. (2013, July 31). Making TVs smart: why most smart TVs still feel pretty dumb. Gigaom. Online. Accessed August 5, 2013, http://gigaom.com/2013/07/31/making-tvs-smart-part-one/

Roettgers, Janko. (2013, August 1). Making TVs smart: why TV app developers struggle to succeed in the living room. Gigaom. Online. Accessed August 1, 2013, http://gigaom.com/2013/08/01/making-tvs-smart-part-two/

Roettgers, Janko. (2013, August 2). Making TVs smart: why Google and Netflix want to reinvent the remote control. Online. Accessed August 2, 2013, http://gigaom.com/2013/08/02/making-tvs-smart-part-3/

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