Here is a list of select Digital Catalog e-books, audios and videos s you might enjoy reading, viewing or listening to over the weekend!

E-Books:

Popular Fiction:

Vows, Vendettas and a Little Black Dress by Kyra Davis: Overjoyed at Maryanne’s engagement, amateur sleuth Sophie Katz can’t wait for the wedding vows and party toasts to begin. But then Dena–best friend, bridesmaid and all-around vixen–is mysteriously shot just after the announcement. Leave this to the authorities? No way. Dena may never walk again, and Sophie vows to marry her fists with the shooter’s face.

Problem is, the number of suspects is off the charts–from jaded lovers to anti-free-lovers to just plain old haters. Dena’s made plenty of enemies thanks to her popular sex shop–and, yes, she’s no saint–but really, who deserves to be shot?

With an superlogical almost boyfriend condemning her vigilante quest, and a wedding planner going vicariously bridezilla over the dream princess wedding, Sophie’s barely thinking straight. But if she can keep her cool (and avoid all errant taffeta), she just might nab her man and save the (wedding) day.

Big if.

Abandon by Carla Neggers: On what is supposed to be a quiet long weekend in New Hampshire, Deputy U.S. Marshal Mackenzie Stewart is viciously attacked at the lakefront cottage of her friend, federal judge Bernadette Peacham. Mackenzie fends off her attacker, but he manages to escape. Everything suggests he’s a deranged drifter–until FBI special agent Andrew Rook arrives.

With Rook, Mackenzie broke her own rule not to get involved with anyone in law enforcement, but she knows he isn’t up from Washington, D.C., to set things straight between them. He’s on a case.

As the hunt for the mysterious attacker continues, the case takes an unexpected turn when Mackenzie follows Rook back to Washington and finds that Bernadette’s former mentor, a once-powerful, now-disgraced judge who has been providing Rook with information, has gone missing. Mackenzie and Rook realize the stakes are higher than either had imagined, and a master criminal with nothing left to lose is prepared to gamble everything.

Critically Acclaimed Fiction:

The Morels by Christopher Hacker: Hacker earns all the stereotypical accolades of a debut novel—promising, ambitious, sincere—but his execution is far more original, and the result is an odd alloy of kitchen-sink family drama and metafictional inquest. Arthur Morel, who as a child was a talented violinist with a flair for self-sabotage, has just finished his second novel (also called The Morels), a barely fictionalized account of his relationship with his wife Penelope and their son, Will. His book’s last scene, however, depicts Arthur and an eight-year-old Will engaging in a sexual act that shocks the public and quickly scuttles his relationship with his family, who are unmoved by his claims of poetic license. Penelope begins to suspect that the novel is an oblique admission by her husband of more than a merely unsavory imagination, and soon Arthur’s mounting troubles become a legal matter. His only remaining ally is a small-time filmmaker, whose faith in his friend’s innocence leads him to make a documentary that might uncover the facts behind the fictionalized Morels. Savvy readers will know that Hacker is up to something from the beginning, and what develops is an eloquent treatise on the rights of artists to exploit their personal histories—and why they do so, and at what cost. The payoff goes a long way toward justifying an overstuffed middle section that suffers from the frequent absence of the novel’s two anchors, the ever-frustrating Arthur and precocious Will. Hacker does more than establish himself with this fine debut; he delivers a mission statement and the book retains the same ability to shock as its namesake. Publishers Weekly review.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer: Shaffer’s debut novel, written with her niece Barrow, is an original account of one writer’s relationship with a member of a unique book club formed as an alibi to protect its members from arrest at the hands of the Nazis during WWII. With a small cast of gifted narrators including Paul Boehmer, Susan Duerdan, John Lee, Rosalyn Landor and the enjoyable Juliet Mills, this production is first-class from top to bottom. The narrators’ British dialects, each quite regional and equally as different as they are ear-pleasing, serve the story well and allow Shaffer’s words to leap from the page into the hearts and minds of her listeners. The final result is an almost theatrical experience with a plethora of enthusiastic performances. Publishers Weekly review.

Non-Fiction

The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter by Ian O’Connor: Every spring, Little Leaguers across the country mimic his stance and squabble over the right to wear his number, 2, the next number to be retired by the world’s most famous ball team. Derek Jeter is their hero. He walks in the footsteps of Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, and Mantle, and someday his shadow will loom just as large. Yet he has never been the best player in baseball. In fact, he hasn’t always been the best player on his team. But his intangible grace and Jordanesque ability to play big in the biggest of postseason moments make him the face of the modern Yankee dynasty, and of America’s game. In The Captain, best-selling author Ian O’Connor draws on extensive reporting and unique access to Jeter that has spanned some fifteen years to reveal how a biracial kid from Michigan became New York’s most beloved sports figure and the enduring symbol of the steroid-free athlete. O’Connor takes us behind the scenes of a legendary baseball life and career, from Jeter’s early struggles in the minor leagues, when homesickness and errors in the field threatened a stillborn career, to his heady days as a Yankee superstar and prince of the city who squired some of the world’s most beautiful women, to his tense battles with former best friend A-Rod. We also witness Jeter struggling to come to terms with his declining skills and the declining favor of the only organization he ever wanted to play for, leading to a contentious contract negotiation with the Yankees that left people wondering if Jeter might end his career in a uniform without pinstripes. Derek Jeter’s march toward the Hall of Fame has been dignified and certain, but behind that leadership and hero’s grace there are hidden struggles and complexities that have never been explored, until now. As Jeter closes in on 3,000 hits, a number no Yankee has ever touched, The Captain offers an incisive, exhilarating, and revealing new look at one of the game’s greatest players in the gloaming of his career.

The Horse in My Garage and Other Stories by Patrick F. McManus: The Horse in My Garage and Other Stories is a hilarious addition to Patrick F. McManus’s existing work in humor. The author weighs in on his childhood, everyday life, and outdoor tales with his typical exaggerated commentary that will elicit a belly laugh from all types of readers. Read about the antics of Patrick’s friends Rancid Crabtree and Retch Sweeney in such stories as “Shaping Up for the Hunt” and “Bear Hunters.” McManus plays off the recent obsession with hoarders in his surprising story “The Lady Who Kept Things.” In the titular story, meet Patrick’s horse, Huckleberry, and enjoy the experience of all the problems that come along with owning your own horse—or keeping him in the garage. Other great stories include: “Catch-And-Eaters,” about the importance of a forked stick when fishing”$7000 TV Historical Extravaganza,” a look at one director’s loose interpretation of historical accuracy and political correctness “A Lake Too Far,” concerning the woes of Patrick and his wife, Bun, on a fateful birding trip in Australia “Chicken Chronicles,” which involves Patrick’s memory of wandering around naked in the chicken yard when guests came to call. So pull up a chair, sit back, and enjoy laughing to the hilarious adventures of Patrick F. McManus in The Horse in My Garage and Other Stories.

Children’s Books:

The Little Duke Richard the Fearless by Charlotte Mary Yonge: Though originally intended for a younger audience, this masterpiece of historical children’s literature is a delight for readers of all ages. The Little Duke tells the story of Richard the Fearless, the young Duke of Normandy who ascended to power at a very young age and was then imprisoned. Escaping with the help of a few key confidants, Richard fought to regain control of his kingdom. The Little Duke is gripping, engaging historical fiction that will keep you interested. (Ages 9 and up).

Little Klein by Anne Ylvisaker: Harold “Little” Klein can’t seem to measure up. Surrounded by the “Bigs,” his boisterous gang of older brothers, and the bustling, bighearted Mother Klein, Harold often feels little and left out — until the day a stray dog named LeRoy becomes his inseparable companion. Join a cast of colorful characters in a rural river town circa 1949, where boys wrestle and fish, swipe pies, ride perilous waters on homemade rafts, and sometimes quietly become heroes. (Ages 8 and up).

Album:

Bluesmaster by Buddy Guy:                                                                                                                                                        Digital Audio Download Includes:

1. A Man And The Blues (Buddy Guy)

2. Stormy Monday Blues (Buddy Guy)

3. It Hurts Me Too (When Things Go Wrong) (Buddy Guy)

4. My Time After Awhile (Buddy Guy)

5. I’m Ready (Buddy Guy)

6. Checking On My Baby (Buddy Guy)

7. So Sad This Morning (Buddy Guy)

8. 24 Hours Of The Day (Buddy Guy)

9. Knock On Wood (Buddy Guy)

Audio Book:

The Elements of Expression: Putting Thoughts into Words by Arthur Plotnik: This is the second, much-updated edition of this funny and useful book. There are many grammar and usage books that give advice on correct English. This isn’t one of them. The Elements of Expression targets expressiveness as a goal apart from getting it technically right. Imagine the yawns a sportscaster would induce by announcing, “His bat struck the ball and the ball went into the stands,” instead of “He took that ball downtown!” And why say, “I’d prefer it if you didn’t volunteer your opinions,” if what you really mean is “When I want your advice, I’ll beat it out of you” (Chuck Norris, Code of Silence)? Written with uncommon wit and humor, The Elements of Expression offers writers, speakers, and self-improvers a fresh look at how they express (or fail to express) their thoughts and feelings. Plotnik supplies many engaging examples of adventurous language to show the tremendous power of words to describe and enliven human experience. Want merely to write correctly? Turn to those shelf-loads of “proper” books. For people who care about language and want to write or speak forcefully, effectively—in a word, expressively—this is the book to crack open.

Video:

The Dark Horse (2008): The Dark Horse is a dramatic story of struggle and redemption. Hearing the news that her father is suffering with dementia, Dana, a thirtyish Seattle ballet teacher, reluctantly returns to her childhood home on Orcas Island to discover that it is threatened with foreclosure. To save the farm and the family, she must tame her mother’s dangerous Friesian horse and ride him to victory in the year’s biggest dressage competition. She must also reconcile her warring brothers, and heal a broken heart.

The STLS Digital Catalog may be found on the library’s homepage of SSCLIBRARY.ORG

Or via the following link:

http://stls.lib.overdrive.com/FE5904CF-8A91-4688-A592-7A046C7988D3/10/536/en/Default.htm

And if you have an smartphone or tablet look for the OverDrive Media Console app in your app store – it is the app that will allow you to check out free library e-books and audio books and download them to your tablet or smartphone.

Digital Catalog music and video titles must currently be downloaded to a Windows computer to enjoy.

Have a great weekend!

Linda R.

 

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