Public Libraries Face Challenges in Offering e-Books: NPR has a new and short podcast on its website today titled Libraries Grapple With The Downside E-Books which sums up the challenges public libraries have in offering patrons access to e-books. In a nutshell, the biggest challenges come from the largest publishers in the U.S. who either won’t allow public libraries to purchase access to their e-books for patrons or will allow public to purchase access to their e-books but either at exorbitant prices or only for a limited time. To be more precise only two of the largest publishers in the U.S., who are known collectively as The Big Six allow public libraries to purchases access to their e-books which then can then offer patrons. And the two publishers that do sell access to their e-books to public libraries, Random House & HarperCollins, sell their e-books at exorbitant prices ($80 for a new bestseller – Random House) or will only sell access to their e-books for a limited time (26 circulations – HarperCollins). And not surprisingly these restrictions are causing a bit of upheaval in the public library world.

Here’s the link to the NPR podcast:

http://www.npr.org/2012/05/29/153900929/libraries-grapple-with-the-downside-of-e-books

HDTV Basics: If you’ve ever wondered what the “HD” in HDTV means than there is a new CNET article just for you! The article, titled When HD Isn’t discusses what HD* means and clues you in on simple things you can do to improve the picture on your HDTV – like using HDMI cables and making sure that you’re really receiving a high definition signal from your cable provider.

Here’s the link to the CNET article:

 http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33199_7-57418594-221/when-hd-isnt-hd/?tag=mncol;txt

 *HD is short for high definition – and the higher the definition number the clearer the picture on your TV is going to be! i.e. 720 is better than 480 and 1080 is better than 720…

Linda R.

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